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The first recorded use of the name "Dolly Varden" for a fish species was applied to members of S. confluentus caught in the McCloud River in northern California in the early 1870s. In his book, Inland Fishes of California, Peter Moyle recounts a letter sent to him on March 24, 1974, from Valerie Masson Gomez:

My grandmother's family operated a summer resort at Upper Soda Springs on the Sacramento River just north of the present town of Dunsmuir, California. She lived there all her life and related to us in her later years her story about the naming of the Dolly Varden trout. She said that some fishermen were standing on the lawn at Upper Soda Springs looking at a catch of the large trout from the McCloud River that were called 'calico trout' because of their spotted, colorful markings. They were saying that the trout should have a better name. My grandmother, then a young girl of 15 or 16, had been reading Charles Dickens' Barnaby Rudge in which there appears a character named Dolly Varden; also the vogue in fashion for women at that time (middle 1870s) was called "Dolly Varden", a dress of sheer figured muslin worn over a bright-colored petticoat. My grandmother had just gotten a new dress in that style and the red-spotted trout reminded her of her printed dress. She suggested to the men looking down at the trout, 'Why not call them "Dolly Varden"?' They thought it a very appropriate name and the guests that summer returned to their homes (many in the San Francisco Bay area) calling the trout by this new name. - Wickapedia

This original GYOTAKU (fish rubbing) was made on 12X18 inch rice paper and is a one of a kind original. The Dolly Varden Trout is 13 1/2 inches long. The paint is a deep, rich green.

Give your fishing lodge, office, or family room an unexpected conversation piece.

Original GYOTAKU are considered a thoughtful gift and are believed to bring good luck not only to fishermen but business people as well. The process is fairly simple: Pigment is applied to a real fish. Then paper is carefully touched to the fish. The GYOTAKU is pulled and a detailed mirror image results. For details on the process visit gyotakuartist.com. Several images may be made from the same fish, but no two are ever exactly alike. Each piece is created in a smoke/pet free studio.

I identify the fish, sign each and supply a certificate of authenticity and other details of the art. It will be shipped in a sturdy flat pack or rolled in a tube. Please see feedback for testimonials.

© 2013 Barry Singer. Reproduction rights belong to the artist.

Dolly Varden Trout GYOTAKU Japanese Fish Rubbings on Rice paper 12X18 Cottage Art

$54.00 USD
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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: rice paper, deep green paint
  • Feedback: 229 reviews
  • Ships worldwide from United States
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