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Vegan Taxidermy's Profile

About

I have been creating birds with this crepe paper and these techniques for about a decade. Each bird is made of individually hand-made parts, using wire for legs, styrofoam for the bulk of the body, paper-mache for refining body shape, Magic-Sculpt (two part sculpting putty) for beaks and claws, hand-cut crepe-paper feathers (often tinted with acrylic paint), and glass eyes. The glass eyes are the only pre-fabricated part of the birds. No moulds are used, so no two birds are ever the same. You can see more about my work at vegantaxidermy.com

Rather than art for Art’s sake, I hope my Vegan Taxidermy sculpture connects people to the natural world, contrasting against “cheap & now” consumer culture and the insular, disconnected world of Art. I focus on individually sculpting unique pieces of art that emphasize highly skilled craftsmanship and whose delicate quality and variety…

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  • Female
  • Joined January 24, 2011

Favorite materials

crepe paper, paper, white glue, scissors, acrylic paint, found objects, wire

About

I have been creating birds with this crepe paper and these techniques for about a decade. Each bird is made of individually hand-made parts, using wire for legs, styrofoam for the bulk of the body, paper-mache for refining body shape, Magic-Sculpt (two part sculpting putty) for beaks and claws, hand-cut crepe-paper feathers (often tinted with acrylic paint), and glass eyes. The glass eyes are the only pre-fabricated part of the birds. No moulds are used, so no two birds are ever the same. You can see more about my work at vegantaxidermy.com

Rather than art for Art’s sake, I hope my Vegan Taxidermy sculpture connects people to the natural world, contrasting against “cheap & now” consumer culture and the insular, disconnected world of Art. I focus on individually sculpting unique pieces of art that emphasize highly skilled craftsmanship and whose delicate quality and variety reflect the natural world they honor. Taxidermy has been a fascinating subject because it represents a strange commoditization of nature, revealing conflicts between preservation and ownership, such as the nineteenth-century occurrence of killing the last few living specimens of (now extinct) birds for wealthy collectors.

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