1/4 LB Pyrite Cubes from Spain

CobbleCreekMiningCo

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1/4 LB Pyrite Cubes from Spain

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Item details

Handmade

Materials

stone, mineral, quartz, gem

Cobble Creek: 1/4 lb of Pyrite Cube Rough from Spain


This is Pyrite cube rough is from Spain. Pieces range in size from 1/4" to 1" on average. Each 1/4 pound will include 6- 8 cubes on average. This is rough, therefore all cubes are not perfect. They will have dings, chips, etc. Just neat knowing that these are grown naturally in this shape. If you're looking for perfectly shaped cubes, please check out our Pyrite section with display specimens.


Each pound will be a random pull from our bulk supply.

From wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrite

"Fool's Gold" redirects here. For other uses, see Fool's Gold (disambiguation).
This article is about iron pyrite. For other pyrite minerals, see Pyrite group.

The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, also known as fool's gold, is an iron sulfide with the chemical formula FeS2 (iron(II) disulfide). Pyrite is considered the most common of the sulfide minerals.

Pyrite's metallic luster and pale brass-yellow hue give it a superficial resemblance to gold, hence the well-known nickname of fool's gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle, and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal.[5][6]

The name pyrite is derived from the Greek πυρίτης (pyritēs), "of fire" or "in fire",[7] in turn from πύρ (pyr), "fire".[8] In ancient Roman times, this name was applied to several types of stone that would create sparks when struck against steel; Pliny the Elder described one of them as being brassy, almost certainly a reference to what we now call pyrite.[9]

By Georgius Agricola's time, c. 1550, the term had become a generic term for all of the sulfide minerals.[10]


Pyrite under normal and polarized light
Pyrite is usually found associated with other sulfides or oxides in quartz veins, sedimentary rock, and metamorphic rock, as well as in coal beds and as a replacement mineral in fossils, but has also been identified in the sclerites of scaly-foot gastropods.[11] Despite being nicknamed fool's gold, pyrite is sometimes found in association with small quantities of gold. Gold and arsenic occur as a coupled substitution in the pyrite structure. In the Carlin–type gold deposits, arsenian pyrite contains up to 0.37% gold by weight.[12]
Cobble Creek: 1/4 lb of Pyrite Cube Rough from Spain


This is Pyrite cube rough is from Spain. Pieces range in size from 1/4" to 1" on average. Each 1/4 pound will include 6- 8 cubes on average. This is rough, therefore all cubes are not perfect. They will have dings, chips, etc. Just neat knowing that these are grown naturally in this shape. If you're looking for perfectly shaped cubes, please check out our Pyrite section with display specimens.


Each pound will be a random pull from our bulk supply.

From wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrite

"Fool's Gold" redirects here. For other uses, see Fool's Gold (disambiguation).
This article is about iron pyrite. For other pyrite minerals, see Pyrite group.

The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, also known as fool's gold, is an iron sulfide with the chemical formula FeS2 (iron(II) disulfide). Pyrite is considered the most common of the sulfide minerals.

Pyrite's metallic luster and pale brass-yellow hue give it a superficial resemblance to gold, hence the well-known nickname of fool's gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle, and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal.[5][6]

The name pyrite is derived from the Greek πυρίτης (pyritēs), "of fire" or "in fire",[7] in turn from πύρ (pyr), "fire".[8] In ancient Roman times, this name was applied to several types of stone that would create sparks when struck against steel; Pliny the Elder described one of them as being brassy, almost certainly a reference to what we now call pyrite.[9]

By Georgius Agricola's time, c. 1550, the term had become a generic term for all of the sulfide minerals.[10]


Pyrite under normal and polarized light
Pyrite is usually found associated with other sulfides or oxides in quartz veins, sedimentary rock, and metamorphic rock, as well as in coal beds and as a replacement mineral in fossils, but has also been identified in the sclerites of scaly-foot gastropods.[11] Despite being nicknamed fool's gold, pyrite is sometimes found in association with small quantities of gold. Gold and arsenic occur as a coupled substitution in the pyrite structure. In the Carlin–type gold deposits, arsenian pyrite contains up to 0.37% gold by weight.[12]

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CobbleCreekMiningCo made this item with help from

  • NA, Easton, PA
CobbleCreekMiningCo made this item with help from:
  • NA, Easton, PA