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Kenyan Frankincense. Sustainably harvested by women of the Samburu Tribe Kenya. Commiphora confusa

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Description

Commiphora confusa-AKA Kenyan Frankincense is one of the most perplexing resins I have encountered to date. Naming it confusa is putting it mildly.
Named thus due to the radically different forms its flowers exhibit, the list of confusing and perplexing inconsistencies of this fragrant oleoresin go far beyond variations in its sex organs.

COMMIPHORA CONFUSA
-Is also known as Kenyan Frankincense even though it is a member of the Myrrh family and in no way a Boswellia or Frankincense.
-It looks very similar to the Boswellia neglecta resin which is also endemic to Northern Kenya and is often mixed in with Frankincense neglecta by collectors and middlemen.
-The fragrance profile of this Frankincense look-alike is, (confusingly), quite similar to that of Frankincense neglecta. -Though they are often distilled together as B. neglecta, C. confusa has distinct aromatic qualities not found in B. neglecta.
-While Boswellia neglecta is confusing enough in that it presents 2 distinct types of resin, a granular black callus resin and a clear thurimel or honey Frankincense resin, C. confusa yields 3 different types of exudates, 2 similar to B. neglecta and one a translucent reddish hue that is odorless and made up of water soluble gum.
On the bright side, C. Confusa does exhibit some traits that are exclusively those of a Commiphora.
-Like other Myrrh species, it grows in the dry valleys, plains and bushland, while Frankincense trees grow on rock at higher elevations.
-Though its fragrance is similar to Frankincense neglecta and indeed it shares many of the same monoterpenes that give B. neglecta its distinct aroma, Commiphora confusa also contains many chemical compounds that are exclusively found in the Commiphora or Myrrh family.
-When compared side by side, it is obvious that this Kenyan "Frankincense" has a different fragrance whether fresh, as an essential oil or burned on the coals than that of Boswellia neglecta. In my experience, C. confusa has a distinct sweet herbaceous scent that is absent in B. neglecta, and while Frankincense neglecta possesses notes reminiscent of our Northern Fir trees, they are absent in C. confusa.
-Though C. confusa shares a similar dark grainy exterior to B. neglecta, this Commiphora bears the auburn hue of myrrh species and consistently reveals a reddish center unlike the tar-black core found in B. neglecta.
-Another distinction between these 2 almost identical resins is that lumps of B. neglecta resin will adhere to one another forming large balls where C. confusa lacks this external stickiness and is found for the most part in small loose pieces reminiscent of cheese curds.
-Like Boswellia negelecta, C. confusa trees cannot be tapped to produce resin. This is an assurance that the resin is sustainably harvested. It will appear only from natural injuries to trunk and limb from romping elephants, goats or Baboons that enjoy nibbling on its bark. Pastoralist tribes like the Samburu collect this resin as they roam with their herds through the bushland. They do not practice traditional tapping and harvesting methods on these trees.

Like the B. neglecta they collect, the Samburu women distinguish between both a light and a dark C. confusa. Yes...I had to see this for myself and it is true!! Initial injury generates a clear "thurimel" a honey type resin devoid of water-soluble gum which hardens translucent and light golden. Subsequent to injury the tree creates "Traumatic Resin Ducts" as does our Northern Spruce. These ducts then generate a special therapeutic sap called "Callus Resin", that acts as a bandage and promotes the growth of protective tissue that heals the wounds, creates scar tissue and isolates healthy flesh from diseased. In Scandinavia, the Spruce callus resin is used in traditional salves for slow healing wounds, diabetic ulcers and post-surgical wounds.

Though similar in many ways to a Frankincense, C. confusa, like all the Myrrh family, is ruled Astrologically by the Moon.

This oleoresin has a Frankincense signature aroma along with complex, sweet herbaceous notes that make it an exceptional incense material on its own or compounded with other aromatics.

Commiphora confusa resin contains many of the anti-fungal compounds found in other Myrrh types which make it ideal for medicated oils, tincture, cremes and salves.

Dan
Commiphora confusa-AKA Kenyan Frankincense is one of the most perplexing resins I have encountered to date. Naming it confusa is putting it mildly.
Named thus due to the radically different forms its flowers exhibit, the list of confusing and perplexing inconsistencies of this fragrant oleoresin go far beyond variations in its sex organs.

COMMIPHORA CONFUSA
-Is also known as Kenyan Frankincense even though it is a member of the Myrrh family and in no way a Boswellia or Frankincense.
-It looks very similar to the Boswellia neglecta resin which is also endemic to Northern Kenya and is often mixed in with Frankincense neglecta by collectors and middlemen.
-The fragrance profile of this Frankincense look-alike is, (confusingly), quite similar to that of Frankincense neglecta. -Though they are often distilled together as B. neglecta, C. confusa has distinct aromatic qualities not found in B. neglecta.
-While Boswellia neglecta is confusing enough in that it presents 2 distinct types of resin, a granular black callus resin and a clear thurimel or honey Frankincense resin, C. confusa yields 3 different types of exudates, 2 similar to B. neglecta and one a translucent reddish hue that is odorless and made up of water soluble gum.
On the bright side, C. Confusa does exhibit some traits that are exclusively those of a Commiphora.
-Like other Myrrh species, it grows in the dry valleys, plains and bushland, while Frankincense trees grow on rock at higher elevations.
-Though its fragrance is similar to Frankincense neglecta and indeed it shares many of the same monoterpenes that give B. neglecta its distinct aroma, Commiphora confusa also contains many chemical compounds that are exclusively found in the Commiphora or Myrrh family.
-When compared side by side, it is obvious that this Kenyan "Frankincense" has a different fragrance whether fresh, as an essential oil or burned on the coals than that of Boswellia neglecta. In my experience, C. confusa has a distinct sweet herbaceous scent that is absent in B. neglecta, and while Frankincense neglecta possesses notes reminiscent of our Northern Fir trees, they are absent in C. confusa.
-Though C. confusa shares a similar dark grainy exterior to B. neglecta, this Commiphora bears the auburn hue of myrrh species and consistently reveals a reddish center unlike the tar-black core found in B. neglecta.
-Another distinction between these 2 almost identical resins is that lumps of B. neglecta resin will adhere to one another forming large balls where C. confusa lacks this external stickiness and is found for the most part in small loose pieces reminiscent of cheese curds.
-Like Boswellia negelecta, C. confusa trees cannot be tapped to produce resin. This is an assurance that the resin is sustainably harvested. It will appear only from natural injuries to trunk and limb from romping elephants, goats or Baboons that enjoy nibbling on its bark. Pastoralist tribes like the Samburu collect this resin as they roam with their herds through the bushland. They do not practice traditional tapping and harvesting methods on these trees.

Like the B. neglecta they collect, the Samburu women distinguish between both a light and a dark C. confusa. Yes...I had to see this for myself and it is true!! Initial injury generates a clear "thurimel" a honey type resin devoid of water-soluble gum which hardens translucent and light golden. Subsequent to injury the tree creates "Traumatic Resin Ducts" as does our Northern Spruce. These ducts then generate a special therapeutic sap called "Callus Resin", that acts as a bandage and promotes the growth of protective tissue that heals the wounds, creates scar tissue and isolates healthy flesh from diseased. In Scandinavia, the Spruce callus resin is used in traditional salves for slow healing wounds, diabetic ulcers and post-surgical wounds.

Though similar in many ways to a Frankincense, C. confusa, like all the Myrrh family, is ruled Astrologically by the Moon.

This oleoresin has a Frankincense signature aroma along with complex, sweet herbaceous notes that make it an exceptional incense material on its own or compounded with other aromatics.

Commiphora confusa resin contains many of the anti-fungal compounds found in other Myrrh types which make it ideal for medicated oils, tincture, cremes and salves.

Dan

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(2,207)
Reviewed by canaanjerome
5 out of 5 stars
17 Apr, 2018
At this point, I think I have purchased every resin that Dan has in the shop. The quality is always great and his descriptions are always spot on.
Commiphora confusa-Kenyan Frankincense. Sustainably harvested by women of the Samburu Tribe Kenya.

Reviewed by kari degryse
5 out of 5 stars
03 Apr, 2018
Completely different profile from the other commiphora species, but a really nice smell. And good quantities with fine extra's ! thanks
Kenyan Frankincense. Sustainably harvested by women of the Samburu Tribe Kenya. Commiphora confusa

Reviewed by canaanjerome
5 out of 5 stars
12 Jan, 2018
This is my first experience with this particular species of Commiphora...but, I’ve already ordered more.
Commiphora confusa-Kenyan Frankincense. Sustainably harvested by women of the Samburu Tribe Kenya.

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Kenyan Frankincense. Sustainably harvested by women of the Samburu Tribe Kenya. Commiphora confusa

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Commiphora Confusa, Black Frankincense, Kenyan Frankincense
  • Feedback: 2207 reviews
  • Favourited by: 28 people
  • Gift message available

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