Handmade toys lead testing for CPSIA

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Original Post

This article about CPSIA toys was in Yahoo.

news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081224/ap_on_bi_ge/tainted_toys

It looks like it's not finalized yet.

"....Failing that, they want the Consumer Product Safety Commission to preemptively declare unfinished wood, wool and cotton and food-grade wood finishes such as beeswax, mineral oil and walnut oil to be lead-free.

U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., lead sponsor of the legislation, says toy makers should not worry. Rush points out that the law already exempts products and materials that do not threaten public safety or health.

"This exemption should be sufficient to affect most companies," Rush said in an e-mail to The Associated Press.

Determining what materials fall under that exemption falls to the safety commission, however, which has yet to issue specific guidelines."

So we are still waiting to see which materials are deemed exempt from this testing???

Posted at 8:17am Dec 24, 2008 EST

Responses

meandmygirls avatar
meandmygirls says

That's exactly what I thought when I read it. It would be so nice to know what the exemptions are so we don't have to "worry". That comment really ticked me off.

Posted at 8:19am Dec 24, 2008 EST

When talking to the gentleman in my Congressman's office, he said no one would know if the wood had ever been treated before you purchased it. That was where he felt the danger was, not in what you put on it.

We know now why this law passed. Congress doesn't have a clue about the toy industry. They have never worked in it, they have never sat at a sewing machine with a piece of cotton fabric, they have never sat with a piece of canvas and a brush and paints. Moms and Dads have always been inventive when it came to their kids. We thought up toys and playthings. Please, Congress, let us continue.

Posted at 8:29am Dec 24, 2008 EST

Lisa Crews avatar
primitiveartdeco says

And then there are those who don't want exceptions:

www.care2.com/causes/health-policy/blog/trouble-in-toyland/

I'm trying to get my thoughts together to reply to this one.

Posted at 8:51am Dec 24, 2008 EST

Marking:)

Posted at 8:55am Dec 24, 2008 EST

I don't think there is one of us, be it a parent, grandparent, neighbor, aunt, uncle, or a Congress person who doesn't think this law is good. That is not the point. It is the way it is being regulated.

An example: If a mom goes into a fabric store and purchases a pattern, some fabric, some buttons and goes home and makes her toddler an outfit, the toddler looks cute, and all are happy. If I am standing beside mom at the cutting table and I purchase a couple of yards of the same fabric, from the same bolt, go home and make a doll dress or toy and put it on my Etsy site, I am in violation. I must go through a 3rd party testing process which is very expensive.

None of us want to see harm come to a child. We put a lot of trust, creativeness, and love into our kids' items. What we are against is the inequality of the testing process.

Posted at 9:00am Dec 24, 2008 EST

I, personally, feel it is my American right to be able to create an item, for anyone, feel that it is safe, and sell it. It puts bread and butter on the table. It is the American way. And if I want to donate a kids' item, that should be my right. Be it to a kid with cancer, to a kid in an impoverished area, to a kids' toy drive for a TV station. This law prohibits this.

Posted at 9:02am Dec 24, 2008 EST

Lisa Crews avatar
primitiveartdeco says

bobbinalong says:
I don't think there is one of us, be it a parent, grandparent, neighbor, aunt, uncle, or a Congress person who doesn't think this law is good. That is not the point. It is the way it is being regulated.

An example: If a mom goes into a fabric store and purchases a pattern, some fabric, some buttons and goes home and makes her toddler an outfit, the toddler looks cute, and all are happy. If I am standing beside mom at the cutting table and I purchase a couple of yards of the same fabric, from the same bolt, go home and make a doll dress or toy and put it on my Etsy site, I am in violation. I must go through a 3rd party testing process which is very expensive.

None of us want to see harm come to a child. We put a lot of trust, creativeness, and love into our kids' items. What we are against is the inequality of the testing process.
______________________

I wholeheartedly agree with you. When I got the e-mail notice about that blog, I was just so flustered that I couldn't respond.

I believe that is the same place that I signed the petition about the CPSIA law, since that is the only petition that I have signed in recent months. How ironic is that.

Posted at 9:04am Dec 24, 2008 EST

This law goes so far beyond lead. It seems to come in sections where they start testing or looking for danger in many items for kids. Bikes I think are next. It continues for ages, introduces a new substance or item about every 6 weeks to 3 months.

Posted at 9:05am Dec 24, 2008 EST

Not sure, Primitive, what blog you are talking about. I don't do blogging. Do well to make my cell work! What are you hearing in your part of the country?

And yes, we all appreciate your signing a petition. Any support we can get is wonderful.

Posted at 9:08am Dec 24, 2008 EST