Whoa! You can't buy your own item.

CHEETAH RUN - 20" x 40" Giclée

Like this item?

Add it to your favorites to revisit it later.
Favorite

Description

The synergism of the artist's knowledge of an animal's habitat coupled with an appreciation of its soul, exquisitely rendered.

This oil painting reflects this artist's unique talent and her love for wildlife.

Her ability to accurately depict an animal's individualism is borne from her extensive knowledge and respect for the animal kingdom and their natural habitat.

This limited edition Giclée was produced from the artist's magnificent original oil painting.

This Gallery Wrapped Canvas Giclée is stretched on stretcher bars and is shipped ready to hang with a hanging wire attached.

~*~

Catch me if you can. The cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, is quite unique. It is the fastest land animal that can reach the speed of 75 miles per hour, covering up to 1,500 feet, accelerating from 0 to 64 mph in just three seconds.

The adult cheetah can weigh up to 140 pounds, with a total body length of up to 53 inches. Add 33 inches for their tail, which is used as a rudder while pursuing prey, enabling the cheetah to make sharp turns. Cheetahs are considered to be the smallest of the big cats. Their paws have semi-retractable claws, providing an extra grip in high-speed pursuits. Their respiratory rate increases from 60 breaths per minute to 150 breaths per minute. Cheetahs can purr on inhale, as well as exhale, and cannot roar. This is one of the many characteristics that sets the cheetah apart from the true big cats.

The cheetah’s fur pattern of spots allow for a nice camouflage in the tall grasses. More adaptations which help the cheetah run quickly and efficiently are their large nostrils and enlarged heart and lungs.
There are distinct pelt patterns among cheetahs. The “king cheetah” has larger, blotchy, and merged spots. Other rare color variations include melanism, speckles, albinism and gray coloration.

The cheetah will vocalize, using the following sounds: chirping (when trying to find each other), churring or stuttering (social greeting), growling (annoyed or in danger), yowling (when danger worsens), and purring (contentment).

The cheetah hunts by sight, not by scent. If a prey is pursued and not caught in less than a minute, the cheetah will give up. This is because the cheetah’s body temperature rises so high that it would kill it to continue. The failure rate of a chase ending in a catch is 50%. The cheetah catches its prey by tripping it. Then the cheetah will bite and hold its prey on the throat to suffocate it. This bite may also sever a vital neck artery. Then the cheetah will eat its prey quickly before its catch is taken by stronger predators. Cheetahs will not challenge another predator because they cannot defend themselves easily and do not want to risk injury, as any injury could slow them down and prevent them from hunting.

The cheetah can be found in Africa or Southwestern Asia and several are thriving in Iran, where conservation methods are being employed. Cheetahs live in open areas but have been seen in mountainous areas.

Many years ago, tamed cheetahs were used to hunt antelopes in the same way that greyhound dogs are used today.

The gestation period for the cheetah is 90 to 98 days. An average litter size is three to five cubs, which can weigh up to 11 ounces at birth. The cubs are born with their spots and an extra downy underlying fur around their necks called a mantle. The cubs stay with the mother for up to 20 months after birth, using those first 18 months to learn how to hunt and avoid predators, starting at only 5 to 6 weeks of age. The life span of a cheetah can be up to 12 years in the wild, 20 years in captivity.

Unfortunately, the cheetah cubs have a high mortality rate due to genetic factors and predators, such as the lion and hyena. Approximately 12, 400 cheetahs remain in the wild in 25 African countries. There are about 60 endangered cheetahs in Iran. The Cheetah Conservation Fund, founded in Namibia in 1990, works with conservationists to manage the world’s cheetah population.

Female cheetahs are solitary creatures, but mother-daughter pairs have been seen together for small periods of time. Male cheetahs, however, are very sociable and will group with each other for life, usually with their littermates. These groups of male cheetahs are called “coalitions.”

The male cheetahs will form a territory, varying in size from 14 to 62 square miles. Unlike other felines, the female cheetah will not form a territory but will live in what’s called a “home range,” overlapping these territories with other females, usually their daughters.

Although cheetahs prefer their wild prey, they have been known to kill livestock, which leads to conflicts between humans and cheetahs. Numerous campaigns have been launched to try to educate farmers and discourage them from killing cheetahs.
The synergism of the artist's knowledge of an animal's habitat coupled with an appreciation of its soul, exquisitely rendered.

This oil painting reflects this artist's unique talent and her love for wildlife.

Her ability to accurately depict an animal's individualism is borne from her extensive knowledge and respect for the animal kingdom and their natural habitat.

This limited edition Giclée was produced from the artist's magnificent original oil painting.

This Gallery Wrapped Canvas Giclée is stretched on stretcher bars and is shipped ready to hang with a hanging wire attached.

~*~

Catch me if you can. The cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, is quite unique. It is the fastest land animal that can reach the speed of 75 miles per hour, covering up to 1,500 feet, accelerating from 0 to 64 mph in just three seconds.

The adult cheetah can weigh up to 140 pounds, with a total body length of up to 53 inches. Add 33 inches for their tail, which is used as a rudder while pursuing prey, enabling the cheetah to make sharp turns. Cheetahs are considered to be the smallest of the big cats. Their paws have semi-retractable claws, providing an extra grip in high-speed pursuits. Their respiratory rate increases from 60 breaths per minute to 150 breaths per minute. Cheetahs can purr on inhale, as well as exhale, and cannot roar. This is one of the many characteristics that sets the cheetah apart from the true big cats.

The cheetah’s fur pattern of spots allow for a nice camouflage in the tall grasses. More adaptations which help the cheetah run quickly and efficiently are their large nostrils and enlarged heart and lungs.
There are distinct pelt patterns among cheetahs. The “king cheetah” has larger, blotchy, and merged spots. Other rare color variations include melanism, speckles, albinism and gray coloration.

The cheetah will vocalize, using the following sounds: chirping (when trying to find each other), churring or stuttering (social greeting), growling (annoyed or in danger), yowling (when danger worsens), and purring (contentment).

The cheetah hunts by sight, not by scent. If a prey is pursued and not caught in less than a minute, the cheetah will give up. This is because the cheetah’s body temperature rises so high that it would kill it to continue. The failure rate of a chase ending in a catch is 50%. The cheetah catches its prey by tripping it. Then the cheetah will bite and hold its prey on the throat to suffocate it. This bite may also sever a vital neck artery. Then the cheetah will eat its prey quickly before its catch is taken by stronger predators. Cheetahs will not challenge another predator because they cannot defend themselves easily and do not want to risk injury, as any injury could slow them down and prevent them from hunting.

The cheetah can be found in Africa or Southwestern Asia and several are thriving in Iran, where conservation methods are being employed. Cheetahs live in open areas but have been seen in mountainous areas.

Many years ago, tamed cheetahs were used to hunt antelopes in the same way that greyhound dogs are used today.

The gestation period for the cheetah is 90 to 98 days. An average litter size is three to five cubs, which can weigh up to 11 ounces at birth. The cubs are born with their spots and an extra downy underlying fur around their necks called a mantle. The cubs stay with the mother for up to 20 months after birth, using those first 18 months to learn how to hunt and avoid predators, starting at only 5 to 6 weeks of age. The life span of a cheetah can be up to 12 years in the wild, 20 years in captivity.

Unfortunately, the cheetah cubs have a high mortality rate due to genetic factors and predators, such as the lion and hyena. Approximately 12, 400 cheetahs remain in the wild in 25 African countries. There are about 60 endangered cheetahs in Iran. The Cheetah Conservation Fund, founded in Namibia in 1990, works with conservationists to manage the world’s cheetah population.

Female cheetahs are solitary creatures, but mother-daughter pairs have been seen together for small periods of time. Male cheetahs, however, are very sociable and will group with each other for life, usually with their littermates. These groups of male cheetahs are called “coalitions.”

The male cheetahs will form a territory, varying in size from 14 to 62 square miles. Unlike other felines, the female cheetah will not form a territory but will live in what’s called a “home range,” overlapping these territories with other females, usually their daughters.

Although cheetahs prefer their wild prey, they have been known to kill livestock, which leads to conflicts between humans and cheetahs. Numerous campaigns have been launched to try to educate farmers and discourage them from killing cheetahs.

Reviews

0 out of 5 stars
No reviews yet

Payments

Secure options
  • Visa
  • Mastercard
  • American Express
  • Discover
  • Paypal
  • GiftcardAccepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Etsy keeps your payment information secure. Etsy shops never receive your credit card information.
Wildart Gallery accepts all major credit cards.
You can even pay with PayPal if you prefer.

Returns & exchanges

Wildart Gallery offers a 14-day money back guarantee.

Purchaser is responsible for all return shipping charges.

Please contact me as soon as possible after receiving your art piece if something is not right.

Shipping policies

All Giclée prints are shipped FedEx Ground. A tracking number will be supplied to you so you know the status of delivery of your purchase.

Please allow 2 weeks for delivery, as each print is custom created just for you.

Wildart Gallery only ships within the Continental United States (lower 48)

Additional policies

Elouise Taylor - Wildart Gallery Artist

Born September 17, 1923, in the San Francisco area, she is the daughter of Dr. Charles Vincent Taylor, Dean of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. Elouise studied ballet from age 5 to age 17, and shortly thereafter joined Sonja Henie Hollywood Ice Review, a career (including movies) lasting more than a decade.

Some of her work displayed at www.wildartgallery.com (a display-only site) illustrates the artistic rendering of Olympic and professional ice skaters at work. The World Figure Skating Hall of Fame acquired and proudly displays an original oil portrait by Elouise Taylor of Sonja Henie, with whom Elouise skated professionally on tour for ten years. To this day, Elouise skates as gracefully as ever.

After raising three beautiful children, she has continued professionally as an artist specializing in wildlife, nature scenes, and portraiture. Still working full time, Elouise continues to bless us with many fine works, some of which appear at this site.

Elouise appreciates the art of motion and balance. This synergism of her knowledge of an animal's habits with the appreciation of its soul is beautifully expressed in her paintings.
Elouise Taylor - Wildart Gallery Artist

Born September 17, 1923, in the San Francisco area, she is the daughter of Dr. Charles Vincent Taylor, Dean of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. Elouise studied ballet from age 5 to age 17, and shortly thereafter joined Sonja Henie Hollywood Ice Review, a career (including movies) lasting more than a decade.

Some of her work displayed at www.wildartgallery.com (a display-only site) illustrates the artistic rendering of Olympic and professional ice skaters at work. The World Figure Skating Hall of Fame acquired and proudly displays an original oil portrait by Elouise Taylor of Sonja Henie, with whom Elouise skated professionally on tour for ten years. To this day, Elouise skates as gracefully as ever.

After raising three beautiful children, she has continued professionally as an artist specializing in wildlife, nature scenes, and portraiture. Still working full time, Elouise continues to bless us with many fine works, some of which appear at this site.

Elouise appreciates the art of motion and balance. This synergism of her knowledge of an animal's habits with the appreciation of its soul is beautifully expressed in her paintings.

CHEETAH RUN - 20" x 40" Giclée

Ask a question

$459.00

Free shipping to United States
Don't wait. There's only 1 of these available.

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Made to order
  • Favorited by: 2 people
  • Gift message available
This shop accepts Etsy gift cards

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 2–3 weeks
From United States

What’s wrong with this listing?

The first thing you should do is contact the seller directly.

If you’ve already done that, your item hasn’t arrived, or it’s not as described, you can report that to Etsy by opening a case.

Report a problem with an order

We take intellectual property concerns very seriously, but many of these problems can be resolved directly by the parties involved. We suggest contacting the seller directly to respectfully share your concerns.

If you’d like to file an allegation of infringement, you’ll need to follow the process described in our Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy.

Review how we define handmade, vintage and supplies

See a list of prohibited items and materials

Read our mature content policy

The item for sale is…