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AFRICAN ELEPHANT "Elephant Charge" - 34" x 68" Giclée

AFRICAN ELEPHANT "Elephant Charge" - 34" x 68" Giclée

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$839.00

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Made to order
  • Favorited by: 2 people
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Description

The synergism of the artist's knowledge of an animal's habitat coupled with an appreciation of its soul, exquisitely rendered.

This oil painting reflects this artist's unique talent and her love for wildlife.

Her ability to accurately depict an animal's individualism is borne from her extensive knowledge and respect for the animal kingdom and their natural habitat.

This limited edition Giclée was produced from the artist's magnificent original oil painting.

This Gallery Wrapped Canvas Giclée is stretched on stretcher bars and is shipped ready to hang with a hanging wire attached.

~*~

Pictured is an African bull elephant, the largest land animal, charging. African elephants are in the genus Loxodonta (Greek for “oblique-sided tooth”). The African elephant shares its genus with the Asian elephant, a slightly smaller rendition with smaller ears. The enormous ears of the African elephant help keep the animal cool in the hot African climate. Asian elephants can be domesticated and are the elephants we see in animal acts and residing in wild animal parks, while African elephants are not so easily domesticated.

These amazing creatures are truly a sight to behold. The male African elephant stands up to 13.2 feet tall at the shoulder and can weigh up to 13,330 pounds. The females can reach up to 8.5 feet tall at the shoulder and weigh up to 7,130 pounds.

Only the male elephant has tusks, which are actually the second set of incisors that grow outward from their mouth. The tusks are used for foraging for food by digging up roots and stripping the bark off of trees. They are also used for fighting during the mating season and to defend themselves against predators. Both the African and Asian elephants have four molars, each weighing about 11 pounds and measuring 12 inches long. Their teeth are replaced six times during their lifetime. Back molars shift forward to replace the front molar when it drops out. A new set of back molars then form each time the aged molars drop out. At 40 to 60 years of age, once this cycle completes and no new molars are formed, the elephant then cannot eat and commonly dies of starvation. Being so large, elephants must consume up to 300 pounds of food a day. They eat roots, grasses, fruit and bark in massive quantities.
On an interesting personal note, the artist Elouise Taylor’s grandfather had acquired a fossilized mammoth molar on his excursions in Alaska in the late 1800s. He built nine outposts and managed copper and gold mines in Alaska. He used the mammoth molar as a doorstop in his home in San Mateo, California, and later it was put on a shelf. The mammoth molar was smaller than our modern elephants but nonetheless quite impressive.

The tusks are made of ivory, which is a valuable commodity to some humans. Even though it has been illegal to kill elephants for their tusks for many years, poaching elephants for their tusks sadly continues to cost the lives of many elephants today. This poaching is unfortunately quite active in the eastern region of Chad. In 1970, there were approximately 400,000 elephants, but by 2006, the number had dwindled to about 10,000.

Some humans are killing elephants because humans have moved into the elephant’s territory, and the elephants, just foraging for food, will destroy the human’s crops. And some populations of elephants have grown so large as to threaten the livelihood of human settlements, giving rise to the justification for “culling” large numbers of elephants to sustain the ecosystem. Interestingly, groups of elephants can be safely driven away from humans by playing back the recorded sounds of angry honey bees.

The trunk of the elephant is used to suck in water for drinking and to spray itself with dust to protect its skin. The trunk is a multi-tasking tool. It contains about 100,000 different muscles. It’s used for breathing, of course, but also for smelling, trumpeting, grabbing potential meals, and for caressing their young. The trunk of the African elephant has two fingerlike protrusions at the end for grabbing small items. The Asian elephant, in contrast, only has one protrusion.

The female cow elephant can give birth to one baby elephant every two to four years. The gestation period is almost 22 months, the longest of any mammal. At birth, the baby elephant weighs around 200 pounds and is about three feet tall.
The synergism of the artist's knowledge of an animal's habitat coupled with an appreciation of its soul, exquisitely rendered.

This oil painting reflects this artist's unique talent and her love for wildlife.

Her ability to accurately depict an animal's individualism is borne from her extensive knowledge and respect for the animal kingdom and their natural habitat.

This limited edition Giclée was produced from the artist's magnificent original oil painting.

This Gallery Wrapped Canvas Giclée is stretched on stretcher bars and is shipped ready to hang with a hanging wire attached.

~*~

Pictured is an African bull elephant, the largest land animal, charging. African elephants are in the genus Loxodonta (Greek for “oblique-sided tooth”). The African elephant shares its genus with the Asian elephant, a slightly smaller rendition with smaller ears. The enormous ears of the African elephant help keep the animal cool in the hot African climate. Asian elephants can be domesticated and are the elephants we see in animal acts and residing in wild animal parks, while African elephants are not so easily domesticated.

These amazing creatures are truly a sight to behold. The male African elephant stands up to 13.2 feet tall at the shoulder and can weigh up to 13,330 pounds. The females can reach up to 8.5 feet tall at the shoulder and weigh up to 7,130 pounds.

Only the male elephant has tusks, which are actually the second set of incisors that grow outward from their mouth. The tusks are used for foraging for food by digging up roots and stripping the bark off of trees. They are also used for fighting during the mating season and to defend themselves against predators. Both the African and Asian elephants have four molars, each weighing about 11 pounds and measuring 12 inches long. Their teeth are replaced six times during their lifetime. Back molars shift forward to replace the front molar when it drops out. A new set of back molars then form each time the aged molars drop out. At 40 to 60 years of age, once this cycle completes and no new molars are formed, the elephant then cannot eat and commonly dies of starvation. Being so large, elephants must consume up to 300 pounds of food a day. They eat roots, grasses, fruit and bark in massive quantities.
On an interesting personal note, the artist Elouise Taylor’s grandfather had acquired a fossilized mammoth molar on his excursions in Alaska in the late 1800s. He built nine outposts and managed copper and gold mines in Alaska. He used the mammoth molar as a doorstop in his home in San Mateo, California, and later it was put on a shelf. The mammoth molar was smaller than our modern elephants but nonetheless quite impressive.

The tusks are made of ivory, which is a valuable commodity to some humans. Even though it has been illegal to kill elephants for their tusks for many years, poaching elephants for their tusks sadly continues to cost the lives of many elephants today. This poaching is unfortunately quite active in the eastern region of Chad. In 1970, there were approximately 400,000 elephants, but by 2006, the number had dwindled to about 10,000.

Some humans are killing elephants because humans have moved into the elephant’s territory, and the elephants, just foraging for food, will destroy the human’s crops. And some populations of elephants have grown so large as to threaten the livelihood of human settlements, giving rise to the justification for “culling” large numbers of elephants to sustain the ecosystem. Interestingly, groups of elephants can be safely driven away from humans by playing back the recorded sounds of angry honey bees.

The trunk of the elephant is used to suck in water for drinking and to spray itself with dust to protect its skin. The trunk is a multi-tasking tool. It contains about 100,000 different muscles. It’s used for breathing, of course, but also for smelling, trumpeting, grabbing potential meals, and for caressing their young. The trunk of the African elephant has two fingerlike protrusions at the end for grabbing small items. The Asian elephant, in contrast, only has one protrusion.

The female cow elephant can give birth to one baby elephant every two to four years. The gestation period is almost 22 months, the longest of any mammal. At birth, the baby elephant weighs around 200 pounds and is about three feet tall.

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Elouise Taylor - Wildart Gallery Artist

Born September 17, 1923, in the San Francisco area, she is the daughter of Dr. Charles Vincent Taylor, Dean of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. Elouise studied ballet from age 5 to age 17, and shortly thereafter joined Sonja Henie Hollywood Ice Review, a career (including movies) lasting more than a decade.

Some of her work displayed at www.wildartgallery.com (a display-only site) illustrates the artistic rendering of Olympic and professional ice skaters at work. The World Figure Skating Hall of Fame acquired and proudly displays an original oil portrait by Elouise Taylor of Sonja Henie, with whom Elouise skated professionally on tour for ten years. To this day, Elouise skates as gracefully as ever.

After raising three beautiful children, she has continued professionally as an artist specializing in wildlife, nature scenes, and portraiture. Still working full time, Elouise continues to bless us with many fine works, some of which appear at this site.

Elouise appreciates the art of motion and balance. This synergism of her knowledge of an animal's habits with the appreciation of its soul is beautifully expressed in her paintings.
Elouise Taylor - Wildart Gallery Artist

Born September 17, 1923, in the San Francisco area, she is the daughter of Dr. Charles Vincent Taylor, Dean of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. Elouise studied ballet from age 5 to age 17, and shortly thereafter joined Sonja Henie Hollywood Ice Review, a career (including movies) lasting more than a decade.

Some of her work displayed at www.wildartgallery.com (a display-only site) illustrates the artistic rendering of Olympic and professional ice skaters at work. The World Figure Skating Hall of Fame acquired and proudly displays an original oil portrait by Elouise Taylor of Sonja Henie, with whom Elouise skated professionally on tour for ten years. To this day, Elouise skates as gracefully as ever.

After raising three beautiful children, she has continued professionally as an artist specializing in wildlife, nature scenes, and portraiture. Still working full time, Elouise continues to bless us with many fine works, some of which appear at this site.

Elouise appreciates the art of motion and balance. This synergism of her knowledge of an animal's habits with the appreciation of its soul is beautifully expressed in her paintings.

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