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WW1 British Enfield Rifle Works 1928 Black & White

WW1 British Enfield Rifle Works 1928 Black & White

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1920s
  • Height: 10 Inches
  • Width: 7 Inches
  • Materials: paper, ink
  • Favorited by: 8 people
  • Gift message available
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Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 3–5 business days
From United States

Description

This 7" x 10" bit of warfare ephemera was gleaned from a encyclopedia from 1928.
Here's what the Wiki has to say about the Enfield Rifle:
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The Lee-Enfield bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle was the main firearm used by the military forces of the British Empire\/Commonwealth during the first half of the 20th century. It was the British Army's standard rifle from its official adoption in 1895 until 1957. The Lee-Enfield used the .303 British cartridge and in Australia the rifle was so well-known that it became synonymous with the term "303". It was also used by the military forces of Canada, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and South Africa, among others.

A redesign of the Lee-Metford, which had been adopted by the British Army in 1888, the Lee-Enfield remained in widespread British service until well into the early 1960s and the 7.62 mm L42 sniper variant remained in service until the 1990s. As a standard-issue infantry rifle, it is still found in service in the armed forces of some Commonwealth nations.

The Lee-Enfield featured a ten-round box magazine which was loaded manually from the top, either one round at a time, or by means of five-round chargers. The Lee-Enfield superseded the earlier Martini-Henry, Martini-Enfield, and Lee-Metford rifles, and although officially replaced in the UK with the L1A1 SLR in 1957, it continues to see official service in a number of British Commonwealth nations to the present day—notably with the Indian Police—and is the longest-serving military bolt-action rifle still in official service.

Total production of all Lee-Enfields is estimated at over 17 million rifles making it one of the most numerous military bolt-action rifles ever produced—second only to the Russian Mosin-Nagant M91\/30, which was itself a contemporaneous design.

There. Put that in your pipe and smoke it!

This gorgeous antique lithograph is the Real Deal... not a scanned photocopy or a download.
SurrenderDorothy's amazing selection of antique and vintage ephemera is always the genuine article.

SurenderDorothy. We'll just blow you away with too many amazing vintage choices!
This 7" x 10" bit of warfare ephemera was gleaned from a encyclopedia from 1928.
Here's what the Wiki has to say about the Enfield Rifle:
----------------------------------------------------------

The Lee-Enfield bolt-action, magazine-fed, repeating rifle was the main firearm used by the military forces of the British Empire\/Commonwealth during the first half of the 20th century. It was the British Army's standard rifle from its official adoption in 1895 until 1957. The Lee-Enfield used the .303 British cartridge and in Australia the rifle was so well-known that it became synonymous with the term "303". It was also used by the military forces of Canada, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and South Africa, among others.

A redesign of the Lee-Metford, which had been adopted by the British Army in 1888, the Lee-Enfield remained in widespread British service until well into the early 1960s and the 7.62 mm L42 sniper variant remained in service until the 1990s. As a standard-issue infantry rifle, it is still found in service in the armed forces of some Commonwealth nations.

The Lee-Enfield featured a ten-round box magazine which was loaded manually from the top, either one round at a time, or by means of five-round chargers. The Lee-Enfield superseded the earlier Martini-Henry, Martini-Enfield, and Lee-Metford rifles, and although officially replaced in the UK with the L1A1 SLR in 1957, it continues to see official service in a number of British Commonwealth nations to the present day—notably with the Indian Police—and is the longest-serving military bolt-action rifle still in official service.

Total production of all Lee-Enfields is estimated at over 17 million rifles making it one of the most numerous military bolt-action rifles ever produced—second only to the Russian Mosin-Nagant M91\/30, which was itself a contemporaneous design.

There. Put that in your pipe and smoke it!

This gorgeous antique lithograph is the Real Deal... not a scanned photocopy or a download.
SurrenderDorothy's amazing selection of antique and vintage ephemera is always the genuine article.

SurenderDorothy. We'll just blow you away with too many amazing vintage choices!

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Returns
We are happy to accept returns in good condition in the original packaging shipped within 48 hours as exchanges only and you agree to pay postage both ways.

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