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Mason Bee House - Simple

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Description

Wild House of Bees nesting boxes are designed to provide nesting habitat for native cavity-dwelling bees. Mason bees, leafcutters, carpenters, yellow-faced bees and other species use hollow tubes found in the wild to build nests and overwinter their young. There are thousands of species of native bees, found naturally in nearly every environment. They are excellent pollinators of a huge variety of native plants, flowers, fruits and vegetable crops.

These native pollinators are non-aggressive and don't produce honey, making this a safe, low maintenance way to practice pollinator conservation and learn about wildlife ecology right in your backyard. The bees that nest in cavities like these are SOLITARY species, meaning females rear their young individually. SOCIAL species like bumblebees, honeybees, wasps and hornets rear their young in colonies, and will not be attracted to the tubes in your Wild House of Bees.

The tubes are made from locally gathered weedy plant species, and each box is handcrafted from salvaged and recycled building materials. Each one varies a bit, but they generally measure 7"H x 7"W x 8" deep. Boxes are usually ready to ship within a couple of days, and come with instructions for placement and care.

Learn more about native pollinators at www.floramontana.org, and by liking "Flora montana" on Facebook! ~~Happy Bees, Happy World~~
Wild House of Bees nesting boxes are designed to provide nesting habitat for native cavity-dwelling bees. Mason bees, leafcutters, carpenters, yellow-faced bees and other species use hollow tubes found in the wild to build nests and overwinter their young. There are thousands of species of native bees, found naturally in nearly every environment. They are excellent pollinators of a huge variety of native plants, flowers, fruits and vegetable crops.

These native pollinators are non-aggressive and don't produce honey, making this a safe, low maintenance way to practice pollinator conservation and learn about wildlife ecology right in your backyard. The bees that nest in cavities like these are SOLITARY species, meaning females rear their young individually. SOCIAL species like bumblebees, honeybees, wasps and hornets rear their young in colonies, and will not be attracted to the tubes in your Wild House of Bees.

The tubes are made from locally gathered weedy plant species, and each box is handcrafted from salvaged and recycled building materials. Each one varies a bit, but they generally measure 7"H x 7"W x 8" deep. Boxes are usually ready to ship within a couple of days, and come with instructions for placement and care.

Learn more about native pollinators at www.floramontana.org, and by liking "Flora montana" on Facebook! ~~Happy Bees, Happy World~~

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(46)
Reviewed by hodgemt
5 out of 5 stars
May 11, 2018
Your presentation at Alpine was very interesting! I'm looking forward to supporting the solitary species pollinators in the area.
Mason Bee House - Simple

Reviewed by Northstar78
5 out of 5 stars
Apr 19, 2018
Sent directly to my mother as a gift. Have yet to see it in person but she said it’s lovely!
Mason Bee House - Simple

Reviewed by Christie Gibson
5 out of 5 stars
Jul 20, 2017
These mason bee homes are beautifully put together. My parents and I were looking for ways we could help encourage the local bee population, so I was glad to find these.
Mason Bee House - Simple

Reviewed by Liz Cavalletto
5 out of 5 stars
Jun 7, 2018
Very pleased with the bee house! Cute, well made, and perfect for our farm!
Mason Bee House - Cottage

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Shipping policies

I make every effort to have the Wild House of Bees nesting boxes in stock and ready to ship within a few days. The houses are made from salvaged lumber and locally harvested plant materials. If availability of construction materials is an issue, shipping may take up to 1-2 weeks.

Additional policies

Q. Is this a house for honeybees?
Nope! The honeybees we have here (Apis mellifera) come from Europe. There are thousands of species of bees native to North America...mason bees, leafcutters, sweat bees, carpenter bees, masked bees and more! These "solitary bees" don't form hives, don't make honey, and rarely, if ever, sting! They build nests in cavities (holes in the ground, in dead twigs, or hollow stems) and are important pollinators of native plants, fruit trees and early-season crops.

Q. How does wild beekeeping work?
In spring and summer, wild bees find sheltered cavities to nest in...like the tubes of your wild bee house! Here they'll deposit eggs, along with a little food (pollen) for the growing larva, in cells lined with mud or leaves. The young bees spend the next winter nestled in these tubes, and emerge in spring to mate and build their own nests. Every few years, you can remove the back mounting board of your bee house to clean out or replace the tubes. This will help discourage parasites and other bee pests. You can gather your own hollow-stemmed plants, or contact me to order a new bundle.

Q. What do native bees need to stay healthy?
FOOD: Native bees like lots of flowering plants around to collect pollen and nectar from. This is what they feed their young!
WATER: A source of water is important to all wildlife. Also make sure there is some mud around; many bees will use it to build their nest cells.
SHELTER: Try to keep your bee house out of heavy rain and winds. Hang it about five feet off the ground, facing south or east toward the warm sun.

Q. Why be a wild beekeeper?
CONSERVATION: By wild beekeeping, you replace nesting sites lost due to habitat destruction, and help conserve the native biodiversity in your region
POLLINATION: As honeybee populations decline, we rely more on wild bees for pollination. That means more flowers, more food, and a healthier environment for everyone
OBSERVATION: Watching wild bees nest year after year is endlessly fascinating, and a great way to learn about local plant and insect ecology

You can learn more about wild beekeeping, native plants and pollinators, wildlife gardening and more at www.floramontana.org.
~~Happy Bees, Happy World~~
Q. Is this a house for honeybees?
Nope! The honeybees we have here (Apis mellifera) come from Europe. There are thousands of species of bees native to North America...mason bees, leafcutters, sweat bees, carpenter bees, masked bees and more! These "solitary bees" don't form hives, don't make honey, and rarely, if ever, sting! They build nests in cavities (holes in the ground, in dead twigs, or hollow stems) and are important pollinators of native plants, fruit trees and early-season crops.

Q. How does wild beekeeping work?
In spring and summer, wild bees find sheltered cavities to nest in...like the tubes of your wild bee house! Here they'll deposit eggs, along with a little food (pollen) for the growing larva, in cells lined with mud or leaves. The young bees spend the next winter nestled in these tubes, and emerge in spring to mate and build their own nests. Every few years, you can remove the back mounting board of your bee house to clean out or replace the tubes. This will help discourage parasites and other bee pests. You can gather your own hollow-stemmed plants, or contact me to order a new bundle.

Q. What do native bees need to stay healthy?
FOOD: Native bees like lots of flowering plants around to collect pollen and nectar from. This is what they feed their young!
WATER: A source of water is important to all wildlife. Also make sure there is some mud around; many bees will use it to build their nest cells.
SHELTER: Try to keep your bee house out of heavy rain and winds. Hang it about five feet off the ground, facing south or east toward the warm sun.

Q. Why be a wild beekeeper?
CONSERVATION: By wild beekeeping, you replace nesting sites lost due to habitat destruction, and help conserve the native biodiversity in your region
POLLINATION: As honeybee populations decline, we rely more on wild bees for pollination. That means more flowers, more food, and a healthier environment for everyone
OBSERVATION: Watching wild bees nest year after year is endlessly fascinating, and a great way to learn about local plant and insect ecology

You can learn more about wild beekeeping, native plants and pollinators, wildlife gardening and more at www.floramontana.org.
~~Happy Bees, Happy World~~

Mason Bee House - Simple

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$40.00

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Salvaged Lumber, Plant materials
  • Made to order
  • Feedback: 46 reviews
  • Favorited by: 324 people
  • Gift message available
This shop accepts Etsy gift cards

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Ready to ship in 3–5 business days
From United States
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