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Hokusai Manga - Three Cranes (7), Ukiyo-e woodblock print. (all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Hokusai Manga - Three Cranes (7), Ukiyo-e woodblock print. (all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Acid Free Fine Art Paper, Archival Inks
  • Favorited by: 2 people
  • Gift message available
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Ready to ship in 3–5 business days
From United States

Description

(all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Woodblock prints have been restored as closely as possible to their intended colors and appearance, with extensive research into the original pigments. Seams from folding and scuffs have also been removed. The print you are viewing is as close to a fresh print as possible, in the spirit of the Ukiyo-e tradition.

Many of these prints were produced for ephemeral purposes, as advertisements for Kabuki plays, or as political satire, they were also often used as household artworks. The meaning of Ukiyo-e, "Pictures of the Floating World" reflects this ephemerality. Most Ukiyo-e prints are between 100 and 250 years old and the printing blocks have often been lost. Due to the nature of the production process, and the frequent recarving of printing blocks, there is no original in the sense of western artworks, Ukiyo-e prints were printed tens to hundreds of times.

The signature on each print gives the name of the artist, the woodblock carver, and the inspecting censor.

Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎), October 31, 1760 (exact date questionable) – May 10, 1849.

Hokusai was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. He was influenced by such painters as Sesshu, and other styles of Chinese painting. Born in Edo (now Tokyo), Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (富嶽三十六景 Fugaku Sanjūroku-kei, c. 1831) which includes the internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s.

Manga is an originally Chinese word, meaning "spontaneous sketches." When asked by his students, Hokusai defined the word as "brush gone wild," emphasizing the free associative form of his sketches. These collections of drawings began to be gathered together and printed in 1814, when Hokusai was 55, and were immediately popular. The first volume was intended as an instruction manual for drawing; Hokusai hoped that it would sell enough copies to get him out of a financial bad patch. It was so popular that 14 more volumes followed. Hokusai arranged the drawings in specific patterns and subjects on each page, but the pages are not connected in their imagery, and there is no continuous story throughout the books, unlike modern manga comics. All the books were printed in three colors for economy and to enable mass production. They were so popular in 19th century Japan that they were even used as wrapping paper to protect exported vases, where they came to the attention of european artists and became a major influence on late 19th and early 20th century western art. Hokusai became more familiar in the west than any other Japanese artist; his print "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" even influenced modernist poetry, particularly the imagist movement, which also drew from Japanese poetic forms. The major modernist poet Hilda Doolittle (H. D.) in her poem "Sappho Fragment 36" includes the lines:

as a wave line may wait to fall
yet (waiting for its falling)
still the wind may take
from off its crest,
white flake on flake of foam,
that rises,
seeming to dart and pulse
and rend the light,

in my view unambiguously based on a vision of a fractal wave structure as is perfectly expressed in Hokusai's print.


Hokusai Manga - Three Cranes

This is a set of two separate illustrations.
(Click on the 'zoom' to see greater detail for each of the two illustrations)


Approximate image sizes:

9" x 13" fine art paper - image size 7.3" x 10"
11" x 14" fine art paper - image size 8.8" x 12"
13" x 19" fine art paper - image size 11" x 15"
(all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Woodblock prints have been restored as closely as possible to their intended colors and appearance, with extensive research into the original pigments. Seams from folding and scuffs have also been removed. The print you are viewing is as close to a fresh print as possible, in the spirit of the Ukiyo-e tradition.

Many of these prints were produced for ephemeral purposes, as advertisements for Kabuki plays, or as political satire, they were also often used as household artworks. The meaning of Ukiyo-e, "Pictures of the Floating World" reflects this ephemerality. Most Ukiyo-e prints are between 100 and 250 years old and the printing blocks have often been lost. Due to the nature of the production process, and the frequent recarving of printing blocks, there is no original in the sense of western artworks, Ukiyo-e prints were printed tens to hundreds of times.

The signature on each print gives the name of the artist, the woodblock carver, and the inspecting censor.

Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎), October 31, 1760 (exact date questionable) – May 10, 1849.

Hokusai was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. He was influenced by such painters as Sesshu, and other styles of Chinese painting. Born in Edo (now Tokyo), Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (富嶽三十六景 Fugaku Sanjūroku-kei, c. 1831) which includes the internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s.

Manga is an originally Chinese word, meaning "spontaneous sketches." When asked by his students, Hokusai defined the word as "brush gone wild," emphasizing the free associative form of his sketches. These collections of drawings began to be gathered together and printed in 1814, when Hokusai was 55, and were immediately popular. The first volume was intended as an instruction manual for drawing; Hokusai hoped that it would sell enough copies to get him out of a financial bad patch. It was so popular that 14 more volumes followed. Hokusai arranged the drawings in specific patterns and subjects on each page, but the pages are not connected in their imagery, and there is no continuous story throughout the books, unlike modern manga comics. All the books were printed in three colors for economy and to enable mass production. They were so popular in 19th century Japan that they were even used as wrapping paper to protect exported vases, where they came to the attention of european artists and became a major influence on late 19th and early 20th century western art. Hokusai became more familiar in the west than any other Japanese artist; his print "The Great Wave Off Kanagawa" even influenced modernist poetry, particularly the imagist movement, which also drew from Japanese poetic forms. The major modernist poet Hilda Doolittle (H. D.) in her poem "Sappho Fragment 36" includes the lines:

as a wave line may wait to fall
yet (waiting for its falling)
still the wind may take
from off its crest,
white flake on flake of foam,
that rises,
seeming to dart and pulse
and rend the light,

in my view unambiguously based on a vision of a fractal wave structure as is perfectly expressed in Hokusai's print.


Hokusai Manga - Three Cranes

This is a set of two separate illustrations.
(Click on the 'zoom' to see greater detail for each of the two illustrations)


Approximate image sizes:

9" x 13" fine art paper - image size 7.3" x 10"
11" x 14" fine art paper - image size 8.8" x 12"
13" x 19" fine art paper - image size 11" x 15"

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(70)

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Returns & exchanges

We are very proud of the quality of our prints, if you are not satisfied, you can return your print(s) within two weeks for a full refund minus the shipping charge.

Shipping policies

USPS First Class with tracking, in a sturdy shipping tube.

Additional policies

Some of the artworks can be customized at additional cost, such as colors, additions, and sizes. Customized orders are not refundable. If you are interested please send an Etsy "Conversation" or use the "Contact Shop Owner" button to request more information.

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