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Inside Akiba Shrine at Ukeji (請地秋葉の境内), Ukiyo-e woodblock print. (all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Inside Akiba Shrine at Ukeji (請地秋葉の境内), Ukiyo-e woodblock print. (all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Acid Free Fine Art Paper, Archival Inks
  • Favorited by: 6 people
  • Gift message available
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Description

(all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Woodblock prints have been restored as closely as possible to their intended colors and appearance, with extensive research into the original pigments. Seams from folding and scuffs have also been removed. The print you are viewing is as close to a fresh print as possible, in the spirit of the Ukiyo-e tradition.

Many of these prints were produced for ephemeral purposes, as advertisements for Kabuki plays, or as political satire, they were also often used as household artworks. The meaning of Ukiyo-e, "Pictures of the Floating World" reflects this ephemerality. Most Ukiyo-e prints are between 100 and 250 years old and the printing blocks have often been lost. Due to the nature of the production process, and the frequent recarving of printing blocks, there is no original in the sense of western artworks, Ukiyo-e prints were printed tens to hundreds of times.

The signature on each print gives the name of the artist, the woodblock carver, and the inspecting censor.

Utagawa Hiroshige (歌川 広重, 1797 – October 12, 1858)

One of the last major ukiyo-e artists in the classical tradition, Hiroshige was heavily influenced by Hokusai's earlier focus on landscape prints. He was imitated by western artists such as Van Gough to an extent that is usually underestimated. Paradoxically, Japanese art itself was transformed by Western models following the Meiji restoration ten years after his death. Hiroshige's focus on landscape studies, with an eye for the effects of light and perspective on the subject, foreshadowed the impressionist movement in Europe. He specialized in technically accomplished series of prints, such as "The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō" and The "Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō." These can be compared with Hokusai's "Thirty Six Views of Mount Fuji," or "A Tour of Japanese Waterfalls." He also produced bird and flower prints in the Chinese tradition.

Hiroshige was born into a Samurai family descended from Tanaka Tokuemon, an influential Northern lord from the late 1600s. His father died in 1809, and he inherited his job of preventing fires in Edo castle. This left him plenty of free time for artistic pursuits. He started painting soon after his parents' death (his mother died the same year), and studied the methods of various schools without committing to any of them. From early on Hiroshige signed his work in his own name, unusual at the time.

His early work mostly consists of actor prints (which provided a reliable source of income), "Okubi-e, or large head pictures" (a bizarrely named genre of what are best termed fashion prints of women's heads, and busts of actors), and book illustrations. Starting in about 1830 he began to concentrate on the landscapes and bird and flower prints he is famous for today. Hiroshige's wife helped finance his trips to various locations by selling her clothing and ornamental comb collection, in the finest "starving artist" tradition. He was never particularly financially successful, and this paradoxically increased his artistic output as he cranked out huge landscape collections for meager payment. In 1856 Hiroshige became a monk, although this did not stop him from working on his well known "One Hundred Famous Views of Edo." He died two years later, his death poem reads:

I leave my brush in the east
and set forth on my journey
I shall see the famous places in the Western Land


Meisho Edo hyakkei (名所江戸百景)
Ukeji Akiba no keidai (請地秋葉の境内)
From the series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Tokyo),
Inside Akiba Shrine at Ukeji - No. 91 - 1857


Publisher:
Uoya ( Totoya, Sakanaya ) Eikichi < Uoei > Odaya
魚屋栄吉 <魚栄>小田屋幕末


Approximate image sizes:

9" x 13" fine art paper - image size 7" x 10"
11" x 14" fine art paper - image size 8.4" x 12"
13" x 19" fine art paper - image size 10.8" x 15.5"
17" x 25" fine art paper - image size 14" x 20"
(all artworks are sold without the "Calliope's Bucket" stamp)

Woodblock prints have been restored as closely as possible to their intended colors and appearance, with extensive research into the original pigments. Seams from folding and scuffs have also been removed. The print you are viewing is as close to a fresh print as possible, in the spirit of the Ukiyo-e tradition.

Many of these prints were produced for ephemeral purposes, as advertisements for Kabuki plays, or as political satire, they were also often used as household artworks. The meaning of Ukiyo-e, "Pictures of the Floating World" reflects this ephemerality. Most Ukiyo-e prints are between 100 and 250 years old and the printing blocks have often been lost. Due to the nature of the production process, and the frequent recarving of printing blocks, there is no original in the sense of western artworks, Ukiyo-e prints were printed tens to hundreds of times.

The signature on each print gives the name of the artist, the woodblock carver, and the inspecting censor.

Utagawa Hiroshige (歌川 広重, 1797 – October 12, 1858)

One of the last major ukiyo-e artists in the classical tradition, Hiroshige was heavily influenced by Hokusai's earlier focus on landscape prints. He was imitated by western artists such as Van Gough to an extent that is usually underestimated. Paradoxically, Japanese art itself was transformed by Western models following the Meiji restoration ten years after his death. Hiroshige's focus on landscape studies, with an eye for the effects of light and perspective on the subject, foreshadowed the impressionist movement in Europe. He specialized in technically accomplished series of prints, such as "The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō" and The "Sixty-nine Stations of the Kiso Kaidō." These can be compared with Hokusai's "Thirty Six Views of Mount Fuji," or "A Tour of Japanese Waterfalls." He also produced bird and flower prints in the Chinese tradition.

Hiroshige was born into a Samurai family descended from Tanaka Tokuemon, an influential Northern lord from the late 1600s. His father died in 1809, and he inherited his job of preventing fires in Edo castle. This left him plenty of free time for artistic pursuits. He started painting soon after his parents' death (his mother died the same year), and studied the methods of various schools without committing to any of them. From early on Hiroshige signed his work in his own name, unusual at the time.

His early work mostly consists of actor prints (which provided a reliable source of income), "Okubi-e, or large head pictures" (a bizarrely named genre of what are best termed fashion prints of women's heads, and busts of actors), and book illustrations. Starting in about 1830 he began to concentrate on the landscapes and bird and flower prints he is famous for today. Hiroshige's wife helped finance his trips to various locations by selling her clothing and ornamental comb collection, in the finest "starving artist" tradition. He was never particularly financially successful, and this paradoxically increased his artistic output as he cranked out huge landscape collections for meager payment. In 1856 Hiroshige became a monk, although this did not stop him from working on his well known "One Hundred Famous Views of Edo." He died two years later, his death poem reads:

I leave my brush in the east
and set forth on my journey
I shall see the famous places in the Western Land


Meisho Edo hyakkei (名所江戸百景)
Ukeji Akiba no keidai (請地秋葉の境内)
From the series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Tokyo),
Inside Akiba Shrine at Ukeji - No. 91 - 1857


Publisher:
Uoya ( Totoya, Sakanaya ) Eikichi < Uoei > Odaya
魚屋栄吉 <魚栄>小田屋幕末


Approximate image sizes:

9" x 13" fine art paper - image size 7" x 10"
11" x 14" fine art paper - image size 8.4" x 12"
13" x 19" fine art paper - image size 10.8" x 15.5"
17" x 25" fine art paper - image size 14" x 20"

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(70)

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Returns & exchanges

We are very proud of the quality of our prints, if you are not satisfied, you can return your print(s) within two weeks for a full refund minus the shipping charge.

Shipping policies

USPS First Class with tracking, in a sturdy shipping tube.

Additional policies

Some of the artworks can be customized at additional cost, such as colors, additions, and sizes. Customized orders are not refundable. If you are interested please send an Etsy "Conversation" or use the "Contact Shop Owner" button to request more information.

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