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This piece is made of vitreous enamel and copper. The technique is called 'grisaille'. Two or three base coats of a dark colour (in this case a deep trasparent blue) are developed on both sides of the piece. The white enamel (which is ground as fine as flour and mixed with oil) is painted on to the ground coat in layers building up towards the highlights. Each layer is fired separately. This piece was fired at least 12 times. The metalic hichlights are added in the final firing.

This techniques was developed in the 14th century France, and perfected over three generations of the great enamel houses of Limoges: Reynaud, Penicaud and Limousin. Most of the subjects were either biblical or classical. I have chosen the image of St Sebastian based on a medieval stained glass window.

St Sebastian fell afoul of the emperor Diocletian by converting so many prominent people to Christianity. Diocletian decreed that he be killed with arrows, but when his body was retrieved, he was found to be still alive. He went on to perform several miracles (including giving sight to the blind) before he was again killed by Diocletian and his body thrown into a privy. However, he appeared to his follwers in a vision, telling them where his body could be found for proper burial.

The piece is 4" x 4". The frame is 9.5" x 9.5", with a 2" width on the frame. The frame is unfinished pine.

St Sebastian

$500.00 USD
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Overview

  • Materials: copper, enamel, pine frame
  • Ships worldwide from Toronto, Canada
  • Feedback: 7 reviews
  • Favorited by: 31 people