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Alvina Yepa Pueblo Melon Bowl - Master Jemez Potter!

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Alvina Yepa, a member of the of the Sun clan, has been recognized Jemez master potter for over 20 years. She is known for fashioning both melon jars and sgraffito (a painstaking technique of etching designs in a piece that has already been fired). carved jars, and also a blending of the two styles.
She started fashioning pottery at the age of 8, studied under the tutelage of her mother, Filipita Yepa. She has won many major awards at all of the larger Indian crafts shows, including Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Pueblos Show, Heard Museum Show, and the Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial in Gallup.
Jemez Pueblo is in Central-Northern New Mexico. Their pottery is known for its distinctive earth-tone colors blending stone polished and matte finishes with painted and etched designs. The people of Jemez abandoned the craft of pottery making sometime in the early 18th century and relied instead on purchasing wares from other Pueblos, mostly Zia. Eventually they began to create their own work again during the 1920s and 30s, incorporating Zia's traditional designs and styles. It was in the late 70s or 80s when Jemez pottery, with the help of noted potters such as Juanita Fragua and Mary Small, that Jemez pottery began to take on more distinctive designs and qualities that have made it very popular among collectors.
I have had this piece since the late 1980's or early 90's. It's approximate dimensions are 3.5" tall by 6" in diameter. I It was displayed for a year or two in a closed glass cabinet, out of direct sunlight, in a smoke free home. It was put in storage for a move and as it was, remained there for about 20 years. It remains in the pristine condition in which it was purchased.

Awards:
Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) 5Santa Fe Indian Market
1987 1st Place & Best of Division Sgraffito bowl
3rd Place Jar with Sun god.
1989 1st Place Large sgraffito pot
2nd Place Plate
3rd Place Mellon bowl
1990 2nd Place Large sgraffito pot
1992 3rd Place Melon bowl
Honorable mention Large sgraffito jar
1993 2nd Place Large sgraffito jar
3rd Place Melon twist wedding vase
1994 1st Place & Best of Division Red sgraffito jar
3rd Place Melon bowl
1996 2nd Place Red and & sgraffito bown
1997 1st Place Jar
Honorable mention Large red & white sgraffito bowl
1998 3rd Place Large kiva bowl
1999 2nd Place Large kokopelli red bowl
2000 1st Place Large eagle sgraffito jar
2002 2nd Place Large pot with feather design
2003 3rd Place Large kokopelli, fine line pot
2006 2nd Place Two tone melon vase
2010 2nd Place Large sgrafito jar with feather design
Eight Northern Indian Pueblo Council New Mexico
1993 2nd Place Pottery
1999 2nd Place Jar and lid
- 3rd Place Pottery
2000 2nd Place Melon bowl swirl design
2001 2nd Place Large red eagle bowl
Northern Pueblo 19th Annual Artist and Craftsman Show
1991 1st Place Red feather bowl
- 2nd Place Traditional pottery undecorated
- 2nd Place Traditional pottery incised
Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market Phoenix, Arizona
1996 Best of Division Large red melon bowl
2003 Honorable mention Large bowl with kokopelli, feathers & fineline
design
Atlanta Spirit of America Show Atlanta, Georgia
2000 3rd Place Large pot with hummingbird design
Prescott Indian Art Market Prescott, Arizona
2006 3rd Place Large pot with Kokopelli design
2007 2nd Place Melon bowl with kiva opening
- 3rd Place Flat vase with turtle and feather design
Cherokee Art MarketTulsa, Oklahoma
2009 3rd Place Butterfly bowl
2012 Best of Category Traditional Pottery
New Mexico State Fair
2009 Honorable mention

Jemez pueblo "Wala-Towa" lies west of the Rio Grande on the Jemez River. Like other neighboring pueblos, their tradition traces their ancestry back to the Four-Corners prehistoric Anasazi people. Anthropologists say that the Jemez people abandoned the making of pottery sometime after the Spanish conquest, but a resurgence of the art form emerged in the 1980s and today their high quality work is sought after by collectors.
Since pottery making has been reestablished at Jemez, they have produced some fine potters, who are using traditional methods of coiling and firing. They have also been able to bring some modern concepts, such as incised designs and melon style ribs and swirls.
Jemez pottery is generally red (although variations exist) and it's quite often completed with a very flat matte finish. The very best potters hand polish their creations to a unique brownish-red finish, which is readily recognized as Jemez pottery.
Alvina Yepa, a member of the of the Sun clan, has been recognized Jemez master potter for over 20 years. She is known for fashioning both melon jars and sgraffito (a painstaking technique of etching designs in a piece that has already been fired). carved jars, and also a blending of the two styles.
She started fashioning pottery at the age of 8, studied under the tutelage of her mother, Filipita Yepa. She has won many major awards at all of the larger Indian crafts shows, including Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Pueblos Show, Heard Museum Show, and the Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial in Gallup.
Jemez Pueblo is in Central-Northern New Mexico. Their pottery is known for its distinctive earth-tone colors blending stone polished and matte finishes with painted and etched designs. The people of Jemez abandoned the craft of pottery making sometime in the early 18th century and relied instead on purchasing wares from other Pueblos, mostly Zia. Eventually they began to create their own work again during the 1920s and 30s, incorporating Zia's traditional designs and styles. It was in the late 70s or 80s when Jemez pottery, with the help of noted potters such as Juanita Fragua and Mary Small, that Jemez pottery began to take on more distinctive designs and qualities that have made it very popular among collectors.
I have had this piece since the late 1980's or early 90's. It's approximate dimensions are 3.5" tall by 6" in diameter. I It was displayed for a year or two in a closed glass cabinet, out of direct sunlight, in a smoke free home. It was put in storage for a move and as it was, remained there for about 20 years. It remains in the pristine condition in which it was purchased.

Awards:
Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) 5Santa Fe Indian Market
1987 1st Place & Best of Division Sgraffito bowl
3rd Place Jar with Sun god.
1989 1st Place Large sgraffito pot
2nd Place Plate
3rd Place Mellon bowl
1990 2nd Place Large sgraffito pot
1992 3rd Place Melon bowl
Honorable mention Large sgraffito jar
1993 2nd Place Large sgraffito jar
3rd Place Melon twist wedding vase
1994 1st Place & Best of Division Red sgraffito jar
3rd Place Melon bowl
1996 2nd Place Red and & sgraffito bown
1997 1st Place Jar
Honorable mention Large red & white sgraffito bowl
1998 3rd Place Large kiva bowl
1999 2nd Place Large kokopelli red bowl
2000 1st Place Large eagle sgraffito jar
2002 2nd Place Large pot with feather design
2003 3rd Place Large kokopelli, fine line pot
2006 2nd Place Two tone melon vase
2010 2nd Place Large sgrafito jar with feather design
Eight Northern Indian Pueblo Council New Mexico
1993 2nd Place Pottery
1999 2nd Place Jar and lid
- 3rd Place Pottery
2000 2nd Place Melon bowl swirl design
2001 2nd Place Large red eagle bowl
Northern Pueblo 19th Annual Artist and Craftsman Show
1991 1st Place Red feather bowl
- 2nd Place Traditional pottery undecorated
- 2nd Place Traditional pottery incised
Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market Phoenix, Arizona
1996 Best of Division Large red melon bowl
2003 Honorable mention Large bowl with kokopelli, feathers & fineline
design
Atlanta Spirit of America Show Atlanta, Georgia
2000 3rd Place Large pot with hummingbird design
Prescott Indian Art Market Prescott, Arizona
2006 3rd Place Large pot with Kokopelli design
2007 2nd Place Melon bowl with kiva opening
- 3rd Place Flat vase with turtle and feather design
Cherokee Art MarketTulsa, Oklahoma
2009 3rd Place Butterfly bowl
2012 Best of Category Traditional Pottery
New Mexico State Fair
2009 Honorable mention

Jemez pueblo "Wala-Towa" lies west of the Rio Grande on the Jemez River. Like other neighboring pueblos, their tradition traces their ancestry back to the Four-Corners prehistoric Anasazi people. Anthropologists say that the Jemez people abandoned the making of pottery sometime after the Spanish conquest, but a resurgence of the art form emerged in the 1980s and today their high quality work is sought after by collectors.
Since pottery making has been reestablished at Jemez, they have produced some fine potters, who are using traditional methods of coiling and firing. They have also been able to bring some modern concepts, such as incised designs and melon style ribs and swirls.
Jemez pottery is generally red (although variations exist) and it's quite often completed with a very flat matte finish. The very best potters hand polish their creations to a unique brownish-red finish, which is readily recognized as Jemez pottery.

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Alvina Yepa Pueblo Melon Bowl - Master Jemez Potter!

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  • Vintage item from the 1980s
  • Favorited by: 14 people
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From Cleveland, OH

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