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Here's a view of John Bartram's home and the small front garden by the driveway. Bartram was an avid plant collector and the home has the oldest Ginko tree in the United States. It has the feel of a country retreat even though it is in the city.

This is a photograph from a medium format film print, so there is a softness and tactile quality not found in digital, as well as beautiful color renditions. You will receive a photograph where the image is printed in the center with a white border. It will be on glossy paper and will be signed, dated and titled on the back by me.

Histo Info: "John Bartram began building his stone house shortly after he bought his farm on the Schuylkill River in Kingsessing in 1728. He completed construction of the original four-room house in 1731, later greatly expanding the house and adding the carved stone facade between 1740 and 1770. Bartram quarried the stone himself and into his whimsical design incorporated elements based on classical architecture including a two-story, columned portico, and hand-carved baroque window surrounds. An inscription on a panel beneath his library window is a frank statement of his Deist philosophy, for which he was disowned by his Quaker meeting in 1758." -www.bartramsgarden.org

Country House in the City Photograph John Bartrams Home on the River Philadelphia Path Walk

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Material: color photograph
  • Made to order
  • Feedback: 157 reviews
  • Ships worldwide from Pennsylvania, United States
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