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The Plural of Ibis is Ibes -Cartoons by Pollux

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In 2010, known ever after in my personal histories as “The Year of the Cartoon,” I had the opportunity to submit cartoons on a weekly basis to The New Yorker, that august bastion of American culture. These opportunities, like chicken pox, come only once in a lifetime. I sharpened my pencil and my wits and got to work.

In search of inspiration, I would wander the city, a lonely, haunted figure, pursued by rabid dogs and colicky opossums. At work, I would keep my ears, eyes, and nostrils open and wander into the company break-room. My stomach filled with free snack bars and my mind buzzing with ideas, I would then wander out. I would grab free periodicals ranging from Malibu real-estate brochures to Spanish-language astrology and tarot magazines. I thumbed through Divorce magazine, something that caused alarm amongst my peers, even though the only ball-and-chain that weighed me down was the personal commitment to draw ten cartoons a week. Occasionally I would socialize.

Doing ten cartoons a week for a year straight results in a number of things: inky fingers, an obsessive desire to see everything and everyone as potential material, and less shelf space due to a growing pile of drawings. I’m proud to say that I never missed a week or fell short of that golden number of ten cartoons, and I consider that an accomplishment in and of itself. It doesn’t matter that none of these were purchased by The New Yorker.

Well, it would have been nice, but a lot of things are nice that are just out of my reach: a harem of hamadryads serving me expertly-made espressos every morning; a xebec docked at the bay stocked full with collectible Golden Age comic books; the keys to a Mediterranean palace of pillars and allochromatic crystals. Nevertheless, it provided an opportunity for growth and evolution as a writer and artist, and for that, I am grateful.

Dipping into the archives, I subsequently resolved to create a book composed of what I consider to be the crème de la crème out of a batch of almost five hundred cartoons. This is the result.
When the world finally comes crashing down around us, and the twilight of the gods plunges the world into chaos and darkness, these cartoons will serve as my little shields of light. The Norse trickster god Loki will sail in on his ship Naglfar, which is fashioned from the fingernails and toenails of the dead, and take a look at these cartoons, and say, “We’re not buying any new material just right now.”
In 2010, known ever after in my personal histories as “The Year of the Cartoon,” I had the opportunity to submit cartoons on a weekly basis to The New Yorker, that august bastion of American culture. These opportunities, like chicken pox, come only once in a lifetime. I sharpened my pencil and my wits and got to work.

In search of inspiration, I would wander the city, a lonely, haunted figure, pursued by rabid dogs and colicky opossums. At work, I would keep my ears, eyes, and nostrils open and wander into the company break-room. My stomach filled with free snack bars and my mind buzzing with ideas, I would then wander out. I would grab free periodicals ranging from Malibu real-estate brochures to Spanish-language astrology and tarot magazines. I thumbed through Divorce magazine, something that caused alarm amongst my peers, even though the only ball-and-chain that weighed me down was the personal commitment to draw ten cartoons a week. Occasionally I would socialize.

Doing ten cartoons a week for a year straight results in a number of things: inky fingers, an obsessive desire to see everything and everyone as potential material, and less shelf space due to a growing pile of drawings. I’m proud to say that I never missed a week or fell short of that golden number of ten cartoons, and I consider that an accomplishment in and of itself. It doesn’t matter that none of these were purchased by The New Yorker.

Well, it would have been nice, but a lot of things are nice that are just out of my reach: a harem of hamadryads serving me expertly-made espressos every morning; a xebec docked at the bay stocked full with collectible Golden Age comic books; the keys to a Mediterranean palace of pillars and allochromatic crystals. Nevertheless, it provided an opportunity for growth and evolution as a writer and artist, and for that, I am grateful.

Dipping into the archives, I subsequently resolved to create a book composed of what I consider to be the crème de la crème out of a batch of almost five hundred cartoons. This is the result.
When the world finally comes crashing down around us, and the twilight of the gods plunges the world into chaos and darkness, these cartoons will serve as my little shields of light. The Norse trickster god Loki will sail in on his ship Naglfar, which is fashioned from the fingernails and toenails of the dead, and take a look at these cartoons, and say, “We’re not buying any new material just right now.”

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FAQs

If you have any questions, feel free to send me a message. To keep shipping and packaging costs down for you as a consumer, and to reduce any chance of scratching or breaking of frames, prints are not framed and unfortunately I don’t sell my work framed. You will just receive the illustration(s) in a strong tube. I apologize for the inconvenience. My goal is to keep my work affordable for you.

I can add a gift message/note at no extra charge for you.
Measurements are in inches unless otherwise stated.
Don't see a musician you like? Please feel free to message me. Yes, I can create a personalized / custom illustration for you!

For new commissions, I do require a $10 deposit and the rest can be paid upon completion.

If you want, you can also let me know any specifications you would want in terms of colors, and also if needed, you can send me a photo of the subjects.

For custom pieces these are the prices:


11 x 14 ink and watercolor piece on cream paper: $20


14 x 17 ink and watercolor piece on cream paper: $24


18 x 24 ink and watercolor piece on cream paper: $29


Domestic US: shipping would be $5

International shipping : $10

The Plural of Ibis is Ibes -Cartoons by Pollux

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