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Victorian amethyst diamond PASTE sterling SILVER gold gilt Riviere bracelet

Victorian amethyst diamond PASTE sterling SILVER gold gilt Riviere bracelet

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$653.00

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1800s
  • Materials: diamond paste, amethyst paste, sterling silver, yellow gold over
  • Favorited by: 48 people
  • Gift message available
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From United States

Description

VERY beautiful and rare authentic antique Victorian Riviere Sterling silver with good layer over of yellow gold quality PASTE stones - bright amethysts pastes and diamonds pastes bracelet!
hallmarked sterling on the clasp. clasp works well! the bracelet in very good condition with only light wear and looks like solid gold, because the layer if the gold still present!
please see photos as part of description.
8" from end to end, weight is 9g approx, marked sterling
can be worn/gifted immediately- comes in a gift box. fast shipping! smoke free environment!
my apologies, I can not accept offers on this item

thank you! please look at my other items!

I found very interesting article online about paste jewelry - I hope you enjoy it as I do:
""My friend Robin searched for nearly a year to find the earrings she wore at her wedding. She did not turn into an obsessive Bridezilla by any means, but she definitely wanted a specific look. And she will be the first to attest that she “tried on every pair of antique earrings in Manhattan” to achieve it. The problem was that she wanted authentic antique diamonds, but with a limited budget, it was clear that diamonds were not this girl’s best friend. In fact, with the price tags she came across, they were no friend at all.

So while her first choice would have been to find real yet affordable gemstones, in the end she selected a pair of antique Georgian paste, which by most untrained eyes looks like the real McCoy. The total bill for the 18th-century danglers was $550; a similar pair made of diamonds could run in the thousands of dollars. “If I had any budget in the world, I would have gone with 10 other options,” she admits. “But paste is the only viable option if you’re not willing to spend the money.”

And she is in good company. King George III and IV, along with other royals and high-ranking members of society, wore paste jewelry. And they certainly could afford whatever they wanted. According to the antique jewelry dealer and historian Jacquelyn Babush, “they knew it was paste, but it was the look they were going for.”

Paste is essentially hand-cut glass. The glass is placed on a metallic foil base, sometimes colored, that causes an effect similar to the glitter of gemstones. Because glass has a more pliable consistency and is less costly than real stones, craftspeople were able to create very elaborate pieces and go beyond what they could accomplish with diamonds.

Paste Jewelry From left: Refined Georgian teardrop dangle earrings in silver, circa 1800; Georgian shuttle or eye-shaped multi-colored paste brooch, circa 1790; French four-part bow and pendeloque paste earrings in silver, circa 1850.
According to what Babush considers the bible of paste jewelry, “Antique Paste Jewelry” by M.D.S. Lewis, “[paste] cannot be regarded simply as a mere simulation of something more valuable. It was made to achieve certain decorative effects which for technical reasons are rarely realized with diamonds and other precious stones.” Many collectors will agree with Lewis that “antique paste jewelry should be considered an art form in its own right.”

The process of making glass jewelry dates back to medieval times but is mainly credited in the Georgian (1714-1830) and Victorian (1837-1901) periods. Where the term “paste” originated is debatable, but some believe it derives from the Italian word “pasta” — understandable since pasta is soft and easily shaped into forms. Babush theorized that the name eventually transformed into the more easily pronounced paste “because the English had to call it something.”

The jewelry reached the peak of its popularity in the early 18th century, mainly due to the work of a jeweler named Georges Frederic Stras. Stras moved from Strasbourg to Paris in 1724, and within a short period of time he was appointed “Jeweler to the King.” To this day, many people refer to fine-quality antique paste as Stras.

No matter what you call it, paste is rare to find. Babush estimates that about 60 percent of the pieces in existence today came from England and France. And it is nearly impossible to find pieces that date back further than 1700. They simply did not survive. But the expert warns that pieces do vary in value. She explained that as the years progressed, in particular during the Victorian era, paste was increasingly mass-produced and lost its quality and craftsmanship.
According to what Babush considers the bible of paste jewelry, “Antique Paste Jewelry” by M.D.S. Lewis, “[paste] cannot be regarded simply as a mere simulation of something more valuable. It was made to achieve certain decorative effects which for technical reasons are rarely realized with diamonds and other precious stones.” Many collectors will agree with Lewis that “antique paste jewelry should be considered an art form in its own right.”

The process of making glass jewelry dates back to medieval times but is mainly credited in the Georgian (1714-1830) and Victorian (1837-1901) periods. Where the term “paste” originated is debatable, but some believe it derives from the Italian word “pasta” — understandable since pasta is soft and easily shaped into forms. Babush theorized that the name eventually transformed into the more easily pronounced paste “because the English had to call it something.”

The jewelry reached the peak of its popularity in the early 18th century, mainly due to the work of a jeweler named Georges Frederic Stras. Stras moved from Strasbourg to Paris in 1724, and within a short period of time he was appointed “Jeweler to the King.” To this day, many people refer to fine-quality antique paste as Stras.

No matter what you call it, paste is rare to find. Babush estimates that about 60 percent of the pieces in existence today came from England and France. And it is nearly impossible to find pieces that date back further than 1700. They simply did not survive. But the expert warns that pieces do vary in value. She explained that as the years progressed, in particular during the Victorian era, paste was increasingly mass-produced and lost its quality and craftsmanship.

My friend Robin got lucky. Although not diamonds, she did get a valuable piece. Babush says Georgian earrings in good condition are hard to come by. Most important, she got the look she wanted for her wedding day. Besides, if it was good enough for Marie Antoinette, Queen Elizabeth I, two King Charleses and Madame du Barry, who needs diamonds anyway?"
VERY beautiful and rare authentic antique Victorian Riviere Sterling silver with good layer over of yellow gold quality PASTE stones - bright amethysts pastes and diamonds pastes bracelet!
hallmarked sterling on the clasp. clasp works well! the bracelet in very good condition with only light wear and looks like solid gold, because the layer if the gold still present!
please see photos as part of description.
8" from end to end, weight is 9g approx, marked sterling
can be worn/gifted immediately- comes in a gift box. fast shipping! smoke free environment!
my apologies, I can not accept offers on this item

thank you! please look at my other items!

I found very interesting article online about paste jewelry - I hope you enjoy it as I do:
""My friend Robin searched for nearly a year to find the earrings she wore at her wedding. She did not turn into an obsessive Bridezilla by any means, but she definitely wanted a specific look. And she will be the first to attest that she “tried on every pair of antique earrings in Manhattan” to achieve it. The problem was that she wanted authentic antique diamonds, but with a limited budget, it was clear that diamonds were not this girl’s best friend. In fact, with the price tags she came across, they were no friend at all.

So while her first choice would have been to find real yet affordable gemstones, in the end she selected a pair of antique Georgian paste, which by most untrained eyes looks like the real McCoy. The total bill for the 18th-century danglers was $550; a similar pair made of diamonds could run in the thousands of dollars. “If I had any budget in the world, I would have gone with 10 other options,” she admits. “But paste is the only viable option if you’re not willing to spend the money.”

And she is in good company. King George III and IV, along with other royals and high-ranking members of society, wore paste jewelry. And they certainly could afford whatever they wanted. According to the antique jewelry dealer and historian Jacquelyn Babush, “they knew it was paste, but it was the look they were going for.”

Paste is essentially hand-cut glass. The glass is placed on a metallic foil base, sometimes colored, that causes an effect similar to the glitter of gemstones. Because glass has a more pliable consistency and is less costly than real stones, craftspeople were able to create very elaborate pieces and go beyond what they could accomplish with diamonds.

Paste Jewelry From left: Refined Georgian teardrop dangle earrings in silver, circa 1800; Georgian shuttle or eye-shaped multi-colored paste brooch, circa 1790; French four-part bow and pendeloque paste earrings in silver, circa 1850.
According to what Babush considers the bible of paste jewelry, “Antique Paste Jewelry” by M.D.S. Lewis, “[paste] cannot be regarded simply as a mere simulation of something more valuable. It was made to achieve certain decorative effects which for technical reasons are rarely realized with diamonds and other precious stones.” Many collectors will agree with Lewis that “antique paste jewelry should be considered an art form in its own right.”

The process of making glass jewelry dates back to medieval times but is mainly credited in the Georgian (1714-1830) and Victorian (1837-1901) periods. Where the term “paste” originated is debatable, but some believe it derives from the Italian word “pasta” — understandable since pasta is soft and easily shaped into forms. Babush theorized that the name eventually transformed into the more easily pronounced paste “because the English had to call it something.”

The jewelry reached the peak of its popularity in the early 18th century, mainly due to the work of a jeweler named Georges Frederic Stras. Stras moved from Strasbourg to Paris in 1724, and within a short period of time he was appointed “Jeweler to the King.” To this day, many people refer to fine-quality antique paste as Stras.

No matter what you call it, paste is rare to find. Babush estimates that about 60 percent of the pieces in existence today came from England and France. And it is nearly impossible to find pieces that date back further than 1700. They simply did not survive. But the expert warns that pieces do vary in value. She explained that as the years progressed, in particular during the Victorian era, paste was increasingly mass-produced and lost its quality and craftsmanship.
According to what Babush considers the bible of paste jewelry, “Antique Paste Jewelry” by M.D.S. Lewis, “[paste] cannot be regarded simply as a mere simulation of something more valuable. It was made to achieve certain decorative effects which for technical reasons are rarely realized with diamonds and other precious stones.” Many collectors will agree with Lewis that “antique paste jewelry should be considered an art form in its own right.”

The process of making glass jewelry dates back to medieval times but is mainly credited in the Georgian (1714-1830) and Victorian (1837-1901) periods. Where the term “paste” originated is debatable, but some believe it derives from the Italian word “pasta” — understandable since pasta is soft and easily shaped into forms. Babush theorized that the name eventually transformed into the more easily pronounced paste “because the English had to call it something.”

The jewelry reached the peak of its popularity in the early 18th century, mainly due to the work of a jeweler named Georges Frederic Stras. Stras moved from Strasbourg to Paris in 1724, and within a short period of time he was appointed “Jeweler to the King.” To this day, many people refer to fine-quality antique paste as Stras.

No matter what you call it, paste is rare to find. Babush estimates that about 60 percent of the pieces in existence today came from England and France. And it is nearly impossible to find pieces that date back further than 1700. They simply did not survive. But the expert warns that pieces do vary in value. She explained that as the years progressed, in particular during the Victorian era, paste was increasingly mass-produced and lost its quality and craftsmanship.

My friend Robin got lucky. Although not diamonds, she did get a valuable piece. Babush says Georgian earrings in good condition are hard to come by. Most important, she got the look she wanted for her wedding day. Besides, if it was good enough for Marie Antoinette, Queen Elizabeth I, two King Charleses and Madame du Barry, who needs diamonds anyway?"

Reviews

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(59)

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Returns & exchanges

As my items are pre owned (antique/vintage) and not new I do not accept returns.
As each item is vintage/antique and it is only ONE available so I can not afford multiple shipping of the same item to many customers as it simply will RUIN the item.
Fine valuable Antique/vintage items should be handled only by one person - it is not a mass production and can not be replaced. this type of the item will not survive with multiple shipping/trying/returning. THANK YOU for reading this and understanding!
Also there is a risk of fraudulent replacement of the parts by a buyer - so these reasons will not allow me to accept returns. thank you for your understanding.

Please review photos and read description carefully for sizes, weight, condition. the photos are part of description. All of the gems, metals are garatneed as described (been tested by professional gemologist).
The pieces sold in my shop are vintage/antique, preowned - not new. they may show wear/age patina. but if it is something major - it will be mentioned in listing.
please if you need a new item it is always possible to buy from another shops, which specializes on selling new items. my items are not new.
I try to describe my items to the best of my ability, but I am human and may miss something unintentionally, Please look at each photograph carefully, as they are part of the description. if you need more photos - please contact me and I will be happy to send more photos.
in RARE cases I could accept a return. PLEASE contact me first if you wish to return the item within 1day after purchase. return it in the same condition as received and pack it the same way. shipping and insurance cost are buyers responsibility.
refund will be given right after receiving and inspecting the item.
both way shipping and insurance costs are buyers responsibility.
20% of restocking fee will be applied.


LAYAWAY
I offer a layaway program for our customers.
Customer must put a 20% down non-refundable payment in order to secure the purchase. The customer must pay off the remainder between 2 or 3 (also 4-6 -12 possible) months in a monthly payment program. For example , if an item is $1000 the customer must put a down payment of $200.00 and pay the rest divided for 2 or 3 months per each month.
the item will be shipped immediately after last payment was made.
in case when the customer decides they do not want the item any more or do not pay within the layaway plan, the item will be re listed to the public. All of the layaway payments are non-refundable.

THANK YOU!
As my items are pre owned (antique/vintage) and not new I do not accept returns.
As each item is vintage/antique and it is only ONE available so I can not afford multiple shipping of the same item to many customers as it simply will RUIN the item.
Fine valuable Antique/vintage items should be handled only by one person - it is not a mass production and can not be replaced. this type of the item will not survive with multiple shipping/trying/returning. THANK YOU for reading this and understanding!
Also there is a risk of fraudulent replacement of the parts by a buyer - so these reasons will not allow me to accept returns. thank you for your understanding.

Please review photos and read description carefully for sizes, weight, condition. the photos are part of description. All of the gems, metals are garatneed as described (been tested by professional gemologist).
The pieces sold in my shop are vintage/antique, preowned - not new. they may show wear/age patina. but if it is something major - it will be mentioned in listing.
please if you need a new item it is always possible to buy from another shops, which specializes on selling new items. my items are not new.
I try to describe my items to the best of my ability, but I am human and may miss something unintentionally, Please look at each photograph carefully, as they are part of the description. if you need more photos - please contact me and I will be happy to send more photos.
in RARE cases I could accept a return. PLEASE contact me first if you wish to return the item within 1day after purchase. return it in the same condition as received and pack it the same way. shipping and insurance cost are buyers responsibility.
refund will be given right after receiving and inspecting the item.
both way shipping and insurance costs are buyers responsibility.
20% of restocking fee will be applied.


LAYAWAY
I offer a layaway program for our customers.
Customer must put a 20% down non-refundable payment in order to secure the purchase. The customer must pay off the remainder between 2 or 3 (also 4-6 -12 possible) months in a monthly payment program. For example , if an item is $1000 the customer must put a down payment of $200.00 and pay the rest divided for 2 or 3 months per each month.
the item will be shipped immediately after last payment was made.
in case when the customer decides they do not want the item any more or do not pay within the layaway plan, the item will be re listed to the public. All of the layaway payments are non-refundable.

THANK YOU!

Shipping policies

I Try My Best To Ship Within 24 -48 Hours Of Payment received/cleared.
USA Shipping Is USPS priority mail With signature Confirmation.
International shipping - Fedex international priority - fast & safe 100% delivery
delivery to Europe usually (from my expierence) takes 3days, China -4-5 days, Australia -4-5 days. but of course, in rare cases, can be a little longer.
All Items Are Packed well and shipped as soon as possible, often the same day
if you need it urgently, please let me know USPS overnight will be used.
Thank you

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