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Martha Sleeper Ndebele Carved Wood Brass Brooch/ Ubangi Brooch Pin/ African Ndebele idzilla Neck Rings Pin / Carved African Wood Bust Pin

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Description

1937 Martha Sleeper wood brooch measures 3 3/8" long x 1 5/8" wide and is in excellent condition. It is indeed a large pin and is nearly as long as a cake of bath soap!

Martha Sleeper was born in 1910 and passed away in 1983. She was an actress who created whimsical and sometimes kitsch jewelry from Bakelite, wood and/or metal in various combinations.

Our Martha Sleeper's pin depicts a traditional married woman of the South African Ndebele Tribe. Ndebele married women are identified by their " Idzilla" which are metal rings worn around the neck, ankles and arms.

Many people refer to this pin as a "Ubangi" brooch but that is an unfortunate misnomer, since, neck rings are not worn by the Ubangi tribe of Africa. The Ubangis are easily identified by their unique facial modification of large Labrets, lip plates, lip discs (usually circular, and made from clay or wood) which are inserted into a pierced hole in either the upper or lower lip, or both, thereby stretching the lip(s). Many also wear large ear plates similar to today's fashion of ear-stretching, in the context of body piercing.

UNDERSTANDING THE "UBANGI" MISNOMER

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, African women wearing lip plates were brought to Europe and North America for exhibit in circuses and sideshows. Around 1930, Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey promoted such women from the French Congo as members of the "Ubangi" tribe; the Ringling press agent admitted that he picked that name from a map for its exotic sound.

The word Ubangi was still given a definition as an African tribe in 2009 in some English-language dictionaries. The word was used in this way in the 1937 Marx Brothers film A Day at the Races.



✿: View Selro kayan lahwi Thai Princess who also wears neck rings ✿:
https://www.etsy.com/listing/484172452/

✿: View Other vintage brooches Here ✿:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/BajanLizard?section_id=15528451

✿ Return to Our Main Shop ✿:
http://BajanLizard.etsy.com



✿ THE GADGET GIRL ✿

by Selma Robinson

“The engaging monstrosities devised by Martha Sleeper”

Collier's Weekly, December 17, 1938, pp. 20-21


Meet Martha Sleeper, a pretty and remarkable young lady, who would rather make bugs than star in moving pictures


If at this moment, hundreds of thousands of feminine lapels are alive with crawling spiders or quivering palm trees, if women's throats are surrounded by wooden nickels and their wrists by blushing raspberries, blame it on Martha Sleeper's childhood. If decoy ducks and bubbling fish and grinning Congo masks have replaced roses and sweet violets as proper adornment for ladies, it is all due to that crazy game the Sleeper kids played on rainy days.


They played it with anagrams and chewing gum. First they chewed the gum. The letters, fortunately, did not have to be chewed but merely rearranged. H-O-R-S-E-G-R-A-S-P-P, by much shifting of vowels and consonants, turned out to be not something you did on a horse's back your first time in the saddle, but merely an innocent insect. Grasshopper. Nor was N-E-C-K-C-H-I any kind of sneeze; it was a species of bird that tastes equally good in the hand or fried & la Maryland.
The best part of this game, as far as Martha was concerned, was the second part, where she molded in chewing gum the grasshopper or chicken or cricket spelled out in the scrambled letters.

With all the gum-chewing Martha Sleeper did, you'd think she'd grow into what the advertisements promise, a healthy, beautiful young woman with perfect teeth, a winning smile and a good digestion; that Broadway and Hollywood would sign her up, and that she'd marry well. You would think that. And you'd be right.

But what gum-chewing really did for her was to establish her as a gadgeteer, a creator of impudent, fantastic ornaments. For she proceeded, by slow stages, through gum to her present finished jewelry in wood and metal and composition.

From chewing gum she went to plastics that did not have to be chewed. She made a smelly mixture of paper towels and instant-drying glue, and out of this torrid pulp she fashioned, with lightning speed, her earliest insects, tarantulas and grasshoppers and praying mantes; and painted them in bright unearthly colors.

Acting as a career was something thrust upon her when a movie producer saw a photograph of her, and offered her the lead in his forthcoming production. Since that time she has appeared in innumerable movies, mostly as the spoiled society beauty who holds her man until he meets Joan Crawford or somebody slinging hash in a beanery. She has played leading roles in such stage hits as Russet Mantle and Dinner at Eight. But what she really wanted to do was to make things with her fingers.

Whatever women think about spiders crawling on their chests apparently has nothing to do with the way they feel about Miss Sleeper's glorified bugs. Her first tarantulas marched in a row down her own linen swim suit. Dolores del Rio and Fay Wray got very rude about wanting to know where and how they could get some. She made a Mexican chameleon to hold up the split brim of her sports hat and peer impudently down on her eyes. She made a hat shaped like a beehive with bees hovering on it and a necklace of bees for her gown. She carved by hand wooden decoy ducks three inches across and wore them on the lapel of her tailored suit. And "Where can I get some?" asked Joan Crawford, Betty Furness and the other Hollywood pretties.

There was no place where they could. Suddenly an idea hit her hard: if all these women who had everything coveted them, what about dozens or even hundreds or maybe thousands who might like to wear them? She went to a friend, a good wise friend, for advice.

The friend was giving a cocktail party for a magazine man who knew everyone and everything. Martha Sleeper appeared in a felt hat that she had blocked over a cocktail shaker to get the elongated crown she wanted. There was a cascade of iridescent coque feathers down the back that gave it the look of a helmet. On one glove she had fastened a wooden rooster with identical coque feathers. The Man Who Knew Everyone and Everything asked where she had dug up such an original hat and glove clip. The Mend broke in: "Martha made them herself. Tell him about your bugs, darling."

She not only told him; she showed him. Out came her jewel box with buzzless bees, stingless tarantulas and hopp-less grasshoppers. He was fascinated, fingering each, examining it minutely. At last he gave her a quick note of introduction to a New York department-store buyer, which Miss Sleeper lost no time in presenting.

The department-store buyer thought they were Something Special, and called the merchandise man. He thought so too and called the window display chief, and when Miss Sleeper left it was with an order for ducks and pineapples; palm trees and Tropical fish.

Designing began to look more serious than her dramatic career. When she went on tour with a road company she would visit the local department stores and get orders. The day came, in Pittsburgh, during a lull in rehearsals, when she called on a buyer at the city's leading shop and gave him a sales talk. The fellow just sat and grunted. When she had finished, he shoved the sample case back at her. The man was saying something. She didn't quite understand.

The man repeated: "I'll take one gross of each."
At that point Martha Sleeper decided to quit toying and get down to business. She called on a noted producer of gadget jewelry. He thought she was very smart and so were her creations but he knew, of course, that it was all just a whim with her and that after a while she'd chuck it for the movies where she could make a million or a thousand dollars a week. He patted her on the shoulder and told her he would go to see her next movie when it came around to his neighborhood, double feature or not.

"Look," said Miss Sleeper, " acting may be more remunerative, but the overhead of being an actress keeps me broke. Cars, mink coats, swimming pools— you know. But you won't give a darn if I wear a Hoover apron and sneakers so long as I can give you the designs you want when you want them. Now just how many did you want again?"

About thirty, he told her indulgently.


A week later she called him. "I've got a few things to show you," she said. "Will you get your partners or judges or whatever you call them together?"

They came, mostly, she supposes, because they wanted to see a movie actress in the flesh, and she produced the samples. Instead of thirty, there were one hundred and forty, filling a small trunk!

"Open it up," said the headman. "Let's have a look."

"No," said Miss Sleeper. "I want to show them to you one at a time."

"Now, Miss Sleeper," he argued, "we know your training as an actress. But forget drama and let's see."

But Martha Sleeper was firm. So the men gave in and awaited the show. One by one she displayed them against her simple black dress:

✿ a necklace of dew drenched strawberries;
✿ a throat pin shaped like a huge Cupid's bow with a gold chain that slipped into a pocket; she pulled on the chain and out popped a cheerful red heart;
✿ a collar of champagne bubbles interspersed with gold swizzle sticks;
✿ a comical black Gabriel with a golden trumpet;
✿ a necklace of wooden birds;
✿ a scallion to pin on a hat;
✿ And, a necklace of little school slates, bound in red with miniature sponges and sticks of white chalk.

The men were pop-eyed. And still the samples came. Magnificent evening clips made like grapes. A bracelet of Navaho silver buttons with a belt to match. The show lasted from nine that night until one the next morning. Martha's color was high and her eyes flamed. The men were wilted but game. When it was over, they found themselves, for some strange reason, applauding like anything. And Miss Sleeper found herself bowing to right and left, like a curtain call.

They selected all but seven of the one hundred and forty. That was exactly a year ago. In those twelve months, more than two hundred thousand copies have been sold.

The other day she brought in a new enamel clip, suggested by something she'd seen in the country— a mother sow nursing nine pink little pigs. Her manufacturer looked alarmed.

"Miss Sleeper, no woman would wear a thing like that!" And Miss Sleeper, remembering her spiders and lizards, said that any woman would wear anything that was amusing and basically good design.

"All right," he said. "Prove it. Try it on my wife."

They showed it to his wife. She examined it minutely. Pigs!

"Now, dear," said he, "Miss Sleeper wants to know if you would wear this—er—clip." The woman threw her arms around Martha's neck. "For me? Oh, you darling," she cried.
1937 Martha Sleeper wood brooch measures 3 3/8" long x 1 5/8" wide and is in excellent condition. It is indeed a large pin and is nearly as long as a cake of bath soap!

Martha Sleeper was born in 1910 and passed away in 1983. She was an actress who created whimsical and sometimes kitsch jewelry from Bakelite, wood and/or metal in various combinations.

Our Martha Sleeper's pin depicts a traditional married woman of the South African Ndebele Tribe. Ndebele married women are identified by their " Idzilla" which are metal rings worn around the neck, ankles and arms.

Many people refer to this pin as a "Ubangi" brooch but that is an unfortunate misnomer, since, neck rings are not worn by the Ubangi tribe of Africa. The Ubangis are easily identified by their unique facial modification of large Labrets, lip plates, lip discs (usually circular, and made from clay or wood) which are inserted into a pierced hole in either the upper or lower lip, or both, thereby stretching the lip(s). Many also wear large ear plates similar to today's fashion of ear-stretching, in the context of body piercing.

UNDERSTANDING THE "UBANGI" MISNOMER

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, African women wearing lip plates were brought to Europe and North America for exhibit in circuses and sideshows. Around 1930, Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey promoted such women from the French Congo as members of the "Ubangi" tribe; the Ringling press agent admitted that he picked that name from a map for its exotic sound.

The word Ubangi was still given a definition as an African tribe in 2009 in some English-language dictionaries. The word was used in this way in the 1937 Marx Brothers film A Day at the Races.



✿: View Selro kayan lahwi Thai Princess who also wears neck rings ✿:
https://www.etsy.com/listing/484172452/

✿: View Other vintage brooches Here ✿:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/BajanLizard?section_id=15528451

✿ Return to Our Main Shop ✿:
http://BajanLizard.etsy.com



✿ THE GADGET GIRL ✿

by Selma Robinson

“The engaging monstrosities devised by Martha Sleeper”

Collier's Weekly, December 17, 1938, pp. 20-21


Meet Martha Sleeper, a pretty and remarkable young lady, who would rather make bugs than star in moving pictures


If at this moment, hundreds of thousands of feminine lapels are alive with crawling spiders or quivering palm trees, if women's throats are surrounded by wooden nickels and their wrists by blushing raspberries, blame it on Martha Sleeper's childhood. If decoy ducks and bubbling fish and grinning Congo masks have replaced roses and sweet violets as proper adornment for ladies, it is all due to that crazy game the Sleeper kids played on rainy days.


They played it with anagrams and chewing gum. First they chewed the gum. The letters, fortunately, did not have to be chewed but merely rearranged. H-O-R-S-E-G-R-A-S-P-P, by much shifting of vowels and consonants, turned out to be not something you did on a horse's back your first time in the saddle, but merely an innocent insect. Grasshopper. Nor was N-E-C-K-C-H-I any kind of sneeze; it was a species of bird that tastes equally good in the hand or fried & la Maryland.
The best part of this game, as far as Martha was concerned, was the second part, where she molded in chewing gum the grasshopper or chicken or cricket spelled out in the scrambled letters.

With all the gum-chewing Martha Sleeper did, you'd think she'd grow into what the advertisements promise, a healthy, beautiful young woman with perfect teeth, a winning smile and a good digestion; that Broadway and Hollywood would sign her up, and that she'd marry well. You would think that. And you'd be right.

But what gum-chewing really did for her was to establish her as a gadgeteer, a creator of impudent, fantastic ornaments. For she proceeded, by slow stages, through gum to her present finished jewelry in wood and metal and composition.

From chewing gum she went to plastics that did not have to be chewed. She made a smelly mixture of paper towels and instant-drying glue, and out of this torrid pulp she fashioned, with lightning speed, her earliest insects, tarantulas and grasshoppers and praying mantes; and painted them in bright unearthly colors.

Acting as a career was something thrust upon her when a movie producer saw a photograph of her, and offered her the lead in his forthcoming production. Since that time she has appeared in innumerable movies, mostly as the spoiled society beauty who holds her man until he meets Joan Crawford or somebody slinging hash in a beanery. She has played leading roles in such stage hits as Russet Mantle and Dinner at Eight. But what she really wanted to do was to make things with her fingers.

Whatever women think about spiders crawling on their chests apparently has nothing to do with the way they feel about Miss Sleeper's glorified bugs. Her first tarantulas marched in a row down her own linen swim suit. Dolores del Rio and Fay Wray got very rude about wanting to know where and how they could get some. She made a Mexican chameleon to hold up the split brim of her sports hat and peer impudently down on her eyes. She made a hat shaped like a beehive with bees hovering on it and a necklace of bees for her gown. She carved by hand wooden decoy ducks three inches across and wore them on the lapel of her tailored suit. And "Where can I get some?" asked Joan Crawford, Betty Furness and the other Hollywood pretties.

There was no place where they could. Suddenly an idea hit her hard: if all these women who had everything coveted them, what about dozens or even hundreds or maybe thousands who might like to wear them? She went to a friend, a good wise friend, for advice.

The friend was giving a cocktail party for a magazine man who knew everyone and everything. Martha Sleeper appeared in a felt hat that she had blocked over a cocktail shaker to get the elongated crown she wanted. There was a cascade of iridescent coque feathers down the back that gave it the look of a helmet. On one glove she had fastened a wooden rooster with identical coque feathers. The Man Who Knew Everyone and Everything asked where she had dug up such an original hat and glove clip. The Mend broke in: "Martha made them herself. Tell him about your bugs, darling."

She not only told him; she showed him. Out came her jewel box with buzzless bees, stingless tarantulas and hopp-less grasshoppers. He was fascinated, fingering each, examining it minutely. At last he gave her a quick note of introduction to a New York department-store buyer, which Miss Sleeper lost no time in presenting.

The department-store buyer thought they were Something Special, and called the merchandise man. He thought so too and called the window display chief, and when Miss Sleeper left it was with an order for ducks and pineapples; palm trees and Tropical fish.

Designing began to look more serious than her dramatic career. When she went on tour with a road company she would visit the local department stores and get orders. The day came, in Pittsburgh, during a lull in rehearsals, when she called on a buyer at the city's leading shop and gave him a sales talk. The fellow just sat and grunted. When she had finished, he shoved the sample case back at her. The man was saying something. She didn't quite understand.

The man repeated: "I'll take one gross of each."
At that point Martha Sleeper decided to quit toying and get down to business. She called on a noted producer of gadget jewelry. He thought she was very smart and so were her creations but he knew, of course, that it was all just a whim with her and that after a while she'd chuck it for the movies where she could make a million or a thousand dollars a week. He patted her on the shoulder and told her he would go to see her next movie when it came around to his neighborhood, double feature or not.

"Look," said Miss Sleeper, " acting may be more remunerative, but the overhead of being an actress keeps me broke. Cars, mink coats, swimming pools— you know. But you won't give a darn if I wear a Hoover apron and sneakers so long as I can give you the designs you want when you want them. Now just how many did you want again?"

About thirty, he told her indulgently.


A week later she called him. "I've got a few things to show you," she said. "Will you get your partners or judges or whatever you call them together?"

They came, mostly, she supposes, because they wanted to see a movie actress in the flesh, and she produced the samples. Instead of thirty, there were one hundred and forty, filling a small trunk!

"Open it up," said the headman. "Let's have a look."

"No," said Miss Sleeper. "I want to show them to you one at a time."

"Now, Miss Sleeper," he argued, "we know your training as an actress. But forget drama and let's see."

But Martha Sleeper was firm. So the men gave in and awaited the show. One by one she displayed them against her simple black dress:

✿ a necklace of dew drenched strawberries;
✿ a throat pin shaped like a huge Cupid's bow with a gold chain that slipped into a pocket; she pulled on the chain and out popped a cheerful red heart;
✿ a collar of champagne bubbles interspersed with gold swizzle sticks;
✿ a comical black Gabriel with a golden trumpet;
✿ a necklace of wooden birds;
✿ a scallion to pin on a hat;
✿ And, a necklace of little school slates, bound in red with miniature sponges and sticks of white chalk.

The men were pop-eyed. And still the samples came. Magnificent evening clips made like grapes. A bracelet of Navaho silver buttons with a belt to match. The show lasted from nine that night until one the next morning. Martha's color was high and her eyes flamed. The men were wilted but game. When it was over, they found themselves, for some strange reason, applauding like anything. And Miss Sleeper found herself bowing to right and left, like a curtain call.

They selected all but seven of the one hundred and forty. That was exactly a year ago. In those twelve months, more than two hundred thousand copies have been sold.

The other day she brought in a new enamel clip, suggested by something she'd seen in the country— a mother sow nursing nine pink little pigs. Her manufacturer looked alarmed.

"Miss Sleeper, no woman would wear a thing like that!" And Miss Sleeper, remembering her spiders and lizards, said that any woman would wear anything that was amusing and basically good design.

"All right," he said. "Prove it. Try it on my wife."

They showed it to his wife. She examined it minutely. Pigs!

"Now, dear," said he, "Miss Sleeper wants to know if you would wear this—er—clip." The woman threw her arms around Martha's neck. "For me? Oh, you darling," she cried.

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(240)
Reviewed by Olga
4 out of 5 stars
Apr 10, 2018
Just received it! Very nice brooch (although it was all dusty and covered in some small debris??). I also appreciate a small gift that you included and will donate it to my daughter school.
Vintage Pauline Rader Rhinestone Deeply Carved Floral Oval Gold tone Brooch Pin

Reviewed by Michelle K Irwin
5 out of 5 stars
Apr 5, 2018
What a lovely piece of jewelery... have wanted a yellow saphire for ages. Fits great, quick shipping and the matching earrings, now they are amazing. Thank you!!!!
Vintage EDCO Emerald Cut Yellow sapphire CZ Clear Baguette 14k HGE Size 8 Ring

Reviewed by Sharon Henson
5 out of 5 stars
Mar 23, 2018
Just what I was looking for, shipped quickly and packaged well.
Vintage Hammered Copper Tone Wide Cigar Band Ring Size 7

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I don't accept returns, exchanges, or cancellations
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.
Returns and exchange details
✿ Refunds and Exchanges ✿

Please read our shop's policies before committing to your purchase inorder to avoid any misunderstanding that may arise.

We aim to accurately describe items and we do include any or all existing flaws in the descriptions and accompanying photographs. It is the buyer's responsibility to read the description and view ALL photos BEFORE purchasing an item. If a clarification is needed please contact us prior to paying. We respond quickly.
Accepted payment methods

We do not accept returns for the following reasons:
a) Buyers remorse
b) Improper size or fit
c) If covered by postal insurance
d) Color in pictures not exact
e) If we shipped on time, but package didn't arrive on time

✿ Refunds are given OR exchanges are offered for items of equitable value ONLY if we, not the Buyer, have inadvertently made a mistake - This includes your original shipping fee and no other shipping fee✿

✿IMPORTANT✿

If we approve a return where we have not inadvertently made a mistake :
Buyer is responsible for cost of return postage.
Refund will be given minus the original shipping fee.
And a 20% restocking fee will be charged.

Please contact us within three days (via Etsy) of receiving your order (counting the day that it was received) if you have any issues. We do not respond to emails outside of Etsy.

KINDLY DO NOT RETURN PACKAGE(S) WITHOUT DISCUSSING YOUR ISSUE WITH US FIRST - IF YOU DO, YOUR PACKAGE(S) WILL BE SENT BACK TO YOU UNOPENED.



ALL SALES ARE FINAL


Do understand that vintage jewelry has some degree of wear owing to age, and is sold AS IS. We believe any existing flaws add character and charm to the products.

AS IS: Term is included in our sales agreement to notify the buyer that no express or implied warranty is provided. The buyer therefore takes the goods or property at his or her own risk, without recourse against the seller for their condition or performance. 'As is' translates into 'with all faults.'

Shipping policies

✿ ORDER PROCESSING TIME ✿

3 business days or less.

✿ DOMESTIC SHIPPING ✿

Shipping and handling fees are not negotiable.

USPS First Class postage is used unless your order is heavier than 13 ounces. Priority Mail mail is used for packages over 13 ounces .

If you prefer Priority Mail, or need overnight Express mail, this can be arranged for the additional fees as stated on the USPS website. This change in shipping services must be arranged prior to purchase.

The USPS offers many additional mail services in conjunction with First Class including Signature Confirmation for an additional $2.55. Please contact us BEFORE YOU BUY if you would like to add Signature Confirmation or if you want to add any other additional services. We will adjust shipping for your desired purchase to include any additional fees.

✿ INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING ✿

Shipping and handling fees are not negotiable.

We ship with USPS First Class International, this service includes tracking for many countries, but does NOT include insurance. Insurance is an additional fee.

Please contact us before purchase so that we can adjust the shipping cost to include insurance, registration or other International services such as Global Express or Priority International.

INTERNATIONAL COMBINED SHIPPING FEES:

If you would rather discuss combined shipping before you buy, just contact us with a list of the items you want to purchase, and we will determine an accurate shipping price. The combined shipping values listed in individual items are estimates, and your actual multiple purchase order weight may have a different value.

****NOTE: INTERNATIONAL DIRECT CHECKOUT PAYMENTS MADE WITH CURRENCY OTHER THAN US DOLLARS WILL TAKE 24 HOURS FOR FULL OR PARTIAL REFUNDS.

INTERNATIONAL DELIVERY TIME:

Please allow more time for your purchase to arrive. It may take two weeks OR MORE to arrive once shipped from the US depending on where you are.

INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMS FEES:

Please do not ask us to falsify the customs forms in any way - we will not alter the number of items that you decide to purchase or their value. Buyer is responsible for all Custom duties and taxes in your country.

The Bajan Lizard shop is not responsible for any added charges.
✿ ORDER PROCESSING TIME ✿

3 business days or less.

✿ DOMESTIC SHIPPING ✿

Shipping and handling fees are not negotiable.

USPS First Class postage is used unless your order is heavier than 13 ounces. Priority Mail mail is used for packages over 13 ounces .

If you prefer Priority Mail, or need overnight Express mail, this can be arranged for the additional fees as stated on the USPS website. This change in shipping services must be arranged prior to purchase.

The USPS offers many additional mail services in conjunction with First Class including Signature Confirmation for an additional $2.55. Please contact us BEFORE YOU BUY if you would like to add Signature Confirmation or if you want to add any other additional services. We will adjust shipping for your desired purchase to include any additional fees.

✿ INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING ✿

Shipping and handling fees are not negotiable.

We ship with USPS First Class International, this service includes tracking for many countries, but does NOT include insurance. Insurance is an additional fee.

Please contact us before purchase so that we can adjust the shipping cost to include insurance, registration or other International services such as Global Express or Priority International.

INTERNATIONAL COMBINED SHIPPING FEES:

If you would rather discuss combined shipping before you buy, just contact us with a list of the items you want to purchase, and we will determine an accurate shipping price. The combined shipping values listed in individual items are estimates, and your actual multiple purchase order weight may have a different value.

****NOTE: INTERNATIONAL DIRECT CHECKOUT PAYMENTS MADE WITH CURRENCY OTHER THAN US DOLLARS WILL TAKE 24 HOURS FOR FULL OR PARTIAL REFUNDS.

INTERNATIONAL DELIVERY TIME:

Please allow more time for your purchase to arrive. It may take two weeks OR MORE to arrive once shipped from the US depending on where you are.

INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMS FEES:

Please do not ask us to falsify the customs forms in any way - we will not alter the number of items that you decide to purchase or their value. Buyer is responsible for all Custom duties and taxes in your country.

The Bajan Lizard shop is not responsible for any added charges.

Additional policies

For small orders we use waterproof polyurethane bubble mailers and securely wrap individual jewelry items in a minimum of two layers of bubble wrap or other new suitable padding / wrapping. For larger orders we use cardboard boxes, typically recycled ones.

If you have any questions, please contact us through Etsy, and in most cases we will respond very quickly. This is the most efficient way to communicate about business done on Etsy. We do not make or accept telephone calls.

FAQs

Items can be reserved with a non-refundable 25% deposit paid at the time of the request.

Full payment is due within 7 days of initial date of reservation.

If full payment is not received at the end of the 7 days, items are returned to inventory and the buyer loses the 25% deposit. We make no exceptions.
We use the shipping address provided in your Etsy purchase order invoice.

If you wish to use another address, either change it in the address field before placing your order, or include a note with your purchase stating the preferred address. .

IMPORTANT

Bajan Lizard does not accept responsibility for the lost of shipping costs owing to the submission of an incorrect address provided by the buyer.

THE BUYER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADDITIONAL SHIPPING FEE ON RETURNED PACKAGES THAT REQUIRE RE-DELIVERY.
Yes, insurance is optional with First Class Mail. The postal service does an excellent job at delivering our packages in a timely fashion without lost or damage.

However, It is highly recommended that you add insurance to your purchase. This safeguards you a full refund from USPS should your mail be lost or damaged in transit by them.

Bajan Lizard does not offer replacements nor refunds for lost or damage that is incurred by the USPS.

Please contact us to add insurance before checking out .

Martha Sleeper Ndebele Carved Wood Brass Brooch/ Ubangi Brooch Pin/ African Ndebele idzilla Neck Rings Pin / Carved African Wood Bust Pin

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$560.00
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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1930s
  • Materials: wood, brass
  • Feedback: 240 reviews
  • Favorited by: 1357 people
  • Gift wrapping and message available
    Details

Shipping & returns

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From United States
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order. See return policy

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