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Vintage CORO Rhinestone Bib Necklace, Art Deco Rhinestone Bib Necklace, Gorgeous Rhinestone Necklace, Bridal Jewelry, Formal Necklace

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Description

This gorgeous singed Coro rhinestone necklace is in a word fabulous! The bib style display affords an elegant focal animation that is very reflective and catches the eye.

This piece is perfect for holiday, evening, bridal, pageant, ballroom and prom. It would also be fabulous for an everyday for a splash of glam.

The necklace is 15.5" clasped and is not adjustable. The bib display measures approx. 2.5" deep.

This gorgeous necklace has a few very slight scratches to the foil back on the largest center stone; other than that I can see no other notable condition issues. The stones are clear and have tons of sparkle. The necklace is in beautiful vintage condition. This elegant necklace would be the perfect finishing touch for any special occasion ensemble.

Please remember that the items in Little Secrets Vintage are in fact vintage, and thus are neither new nor in mint condition. While many are in exemplary condition, all were previously loved by someone else, and while not perfect each is full of old history and charm. Please use photos to make your decisions, be sure to ask any questions you may have, and read my policies before buying so you can have a wonderful experience with Little Secrets Vintage.


History of Coro Costume Jewelry

Coro, Inc., one of the largest and most prolific costume jewelry manufacturing and wholesale companies in the United States and the world, would have been 100 years old in 2001, had it only lasted that long.

The Beginnings:

Coro was begun in 1901 by Emanuel Cohn and Carl Rosenberger who opened a small accessories store on Broadway in New York City. Not until 1943, did the company name Coro, a contraction of the first two letters of each partner's last name, change to Coro, Inc.

But Cohn and Rosenberger were not designers of jewelry. They may have had their own ideas of what they envisioned and how they wanted to sell their jewelry but they did not individually or together design any of it; they found professional jewelry designers for this work. Cohn & Rosenberger was first a sales organization, later to acquire its own manufacturing facilities.

The Designers:

Adolph Katz, a name well known to Coro collectors because of the many design and mechanism patents he filed, and certainly well known to all who did business with Coro, was, however, not a jewelry designer.

In several reference works, Adoph Katz has been listed as a Coro designer but Liz has it on good authority that he did not do any design work. It was assumed by the writers of these books that he was the designer because he signed his name on the patent applications. However, from 1924 on, he was the man in charge of selecting the designs Coro would manufacture, commission to be manufactured, and sell.

Adolph Katz choose the designs from a large pool of designers, many of whom went on to become known by their own names in their own or other companies. Other designs were picked from portfolio drawings sold by unknown artists.

Francois was one such designer who joined Coro with his floral brooch designs in 1938. A special introductory advertisement featured his first line for Coro. Francois later marketed his jewelry under his own name, Francois.

Other notable Coro designers included Gene Verecchio, probably most famous for his design of the Quivering Camellia Duette *. His story was featured in the Vintage Fashion Costume Jewelry Club Newsletter in 2001. Several other designers are mentioned in the design patent applications by Coro, notably, Oscar Placco, Robert Geissmann, Massa Raimond. It was, however, not a custom at Coro to mark individual jewelry with a designer's name except in rare instances.

Adolph Katz, as the design director for Coro, was probably the single largest influence in creating the look for which Coro became known and popular with the jewelry buying public.

The Styles:

Well known designs for Coro, and much in demand by collectors today, are the double clips which could be combined into one brooch, trademarked as Coro Duette. The mechanism for the Duette was patented in 1931. This mechanism varied in styling for each individual design but how the interlocking components functioned remained essentially unchanged. The Duette brooch and clips styles stayed popular throughout the 1940s. However, on the new lighter synthetic fabrics arriving after World War II, especially knits, the heavy clips proved impractical. By the early 1950s the fashion had faded considerably although clips were still being marketed in smaller and lighter versions.

It's hard to define a complete Coro look as Coro produced such a varity of jewelry. Coro collectors who like the classic designs can usually recognize Coro jewelry among its many imitations. Coro workmanship and finish were outstanding even on its less expensive lines. Always striving for the pretty, feminine and romantic in expression, Coro jewelry was known for its delicate yet sturdy construction, its florals and figurals.

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, to compete with Monet and Trifari, especially, Coro launched several quite high-priced (even more so for that time) lines of jewelry to be sold in fine specialty stores.

Trifari may have pioneered the socalled jellybelly jewelry with carved Lucite centers, but Coro soon followed with its own figurals, also with Lucite centers, and later also with colored glass centers. Coro figurals from this era are today highly treasured by collectors.

Trifari had copied the multi-color precious stone jewelry by Cartier, it became known as fruit salad among collectors. Coro followed with its own versions, some very similar to Trifari's, others quite innovative using socalled carved glass stones.

During World War II Coro contributed many patriotic jewelry styles, notably the Emblem Of The Americas brooch, one example of which was seen at the Vintage Fashion & Costume Jewelry Convention in Rhode Island, in October, 2001, which Convention is covered in a reportage on this site.

Romantic styles, inspired by Victorian classic motifs, first took popular hold in the late 1930s, a counterpoint to the straight lines of Deco-styled jewelry which had been popular since the 1920s. After World War II, florals and romantic, even whimsical motifs, still reigned and florished until well into the late 1950s. Coro established itself as the main producer of this popular style jewelry.

The Manufacturing and Marketing:

Selecting designs for Coro was one thing, selling them was another. An able sales director, Royal Marcher, saw to the distribution of Coro mark jewelry. He did it so well that in 1929, Cohn & Rosenberger felt confident to invest in a brand-new factory. They selected Providence, Rhode Island, which since the 18th century had held prominence as one of the main hubs for jewelry manufacturing in the United States.

The new Coro factory was the largest and most state-of-the-art costume jewelry manufacturing plant in the world. At the height of its operation, more than 3,500 employees produced Coro jewelry there.

In 1929, the infamous New York stock market crash reduced many companies to ashes. Not Coro. Boldly, Cohn & Rosenberger instead issued a public stock offering. They repeated it with another public stock offering in 1945, an end-of-war year. Both moves would have appeared to go against anyone's better judgment but these actions resulted in Coro staying in business, even expanding, whereas many other companies did not.

Coro branched out as well. Corocraft was one branch opened in England in 1933. In spite of war and hardships, the success of Coro marched on. By 1952, Coro maintained showrooms in all the top U.S. and Canadian cities. The heyday for Coro production lasted through the mid-1950s.

The Jewelry Lines and Marks:

Coro's mainstay products consisted of cast jewelry although stampings were also used. Coro marketed many so called lines of jewelry. Unique names were invented for the different lines depending on which type store would be selling them. Some stores would sell, or carry one or several lines but not certain others, and vice versa.

The name and/or mark of each line was only important at that time for this reason:

A store that sold, say, Coro-marked jewelry, was not allowed to carry Vendome mark jewelry. Vendome was Coro's better line, more costly. A better store would carry Vendome but would not want Coro [mark] because by the early 1950s it had come to represent a cheaper line.

The later Coro lines, from 1950s and on, with the Coro mark on them, were only sold in general department stores. Better specialty stores such Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Lord & Taylor, Dillard's, Bloomingdale's, Gum's, and other fine stores, would carry Vendome, Corocraft, Coro Sterling Craft but not plain Coro. These lines were pricier to appeal to the specialty store customer.

But not necessarily all lines were produced at the Coro plant, some were made by other manufacturing contractors, such as the Hedison Co. in Providence. Some lines were even imported, including lower-priced items with a Coro hangtag which also had the country of origin printed on the reverse.

The Decline:

By the end of the 1950s Coro's well was running dry, however. In 1957, Richton International Corp. of New York bought the American assests of Coro, Inc., and continued producing jewelry in Providence.

New fashion trends in jewelry, to bloom in the 1960s, included beads. Although Coro jewelry was still well represented in stores and purchased by many women who liked it, the company was heavily invested in stampings, castings, rhinestones and accompanying components, thus not ready for a switch to beads.

Coro imported bead jewelry from other countries to compete but the U.S. casting manufacturing production suffered as a result. By the early 1970s Coro had lost its market dominance to bead fashions and to other competition such as Monet, a company that had the world market cornered on socalled tailored jewelry, i.e. plain gold [look] styles without stones, suitable for every day and business wear. In the 1970s, competition from the Asian countries Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, also cut deeply into Coro market share.

Coro, still by owned by Richton International, tried everything to recoup its market share but finally called it quits in 1979, after 78 years in business. The Canadian branches of Coro, Inc. continued manufacturing operations well into the 1990s. It is not known exactly which year Coro ceased operations in Canada although 1998 has been mentioned by some sources. At one time it was rumoured that Coro, Inc. would continue to produce jewelry in Mexico but this has not been confirmed to this writer. Updated information from informed readers is welcomed.

Coro information was obtained from www.jewelcollect.org

Please remember that the items in Little Secrets Vintage are in fact vintage, and thus are neither new nor in mint condition. While many are in exemplary condition, all were previously loved by someone else, and while not perfect each is full of old history and charm. Please use photos to make your decisions, be sure to ask any questions you may have, and read my policies before buying so you can have a wonderful experience with Little Secrets Vintage. Please refer to the IMPORTANT INFORMATION in the Additional Policies and FAQs!
This gorgeous singed Coro rhinestone necklace is in a word fabulous! The bib style display affords an elegant focal animation that is very reflective and catches the eye.

This piece is perfect for holiday, evening, bridal, pageant, ballroom and prom. It would also be fabulous for an everyday for a splash of glam.

The necklace is 15.5" clasped and is not adjustable. The bib display measures approx. 2.5" deep.

This gorgeous necklace has a few very slight scratches to the foil back on the largest center stone; other than that I can see no other notable condition issues. The stones are clear and have tons of sparkle. The necklace is in beautiful vintage condition. This elegant necklace would be the perfect finishing touch for any special occasion ensemble.

Please remember that the items in Little Secrets Vintage are in fact vintage, and thus are neither new nor in mint condition. While many are in exemplary condition, all were previously loved by someone else, and while not perfect each is full of old history and charm. Please use photos to make your decisions, be sure to ask any questions you may have, and read my policies before buying so you can have a wonderful experience with Little Secrets Vintage.


History of Coro Costume Jewelry

Coro, Inc., one of the largest and most prolific costume jewelry manufacturing and wholesale companies in the United States and the world, would have been 100 years old in 2001, had it only lasted that long.

The Beginnings:

Coro was begun in 1901 by Emanuel Cohn and Carl Rosenberger who opened a small accessories store on Broadway in New York City. Not until 1943, did the company name Coro, a contraction of the first two letters of each partner's last name, change to Coro, Inc.

But Cohn and Rosenberger were not designers of jewelry. They may have had their own ideas of what they envisioned and how they wanted to sell their jewelry but they did not individually or together design any of it; they found professional jewelry designers for this work. Cohn & Rosenberger was first a sales organization, later to acquire its own manufacturing facilities.

The Designers:

Adolph Katz, a name well known to Coro collectors because of the many design and mechanism patents he filed, and certainly well known to all who did business with Coro, was, however, not a jewelry designer.

In several reference works, Adoph Katz has been listed as a Coro designer but Liz has it on good authority that he did not do any design work. It was assumed by the writers of these books that he was the designer because he signed his name on the patent applications. However, from 1924 on, he was the man in charge of selecting the designs Coro would manufacture, commission to be manufactured, and sell.

Adolph Katz choose the designs from a large pool of designers, many of whom went on to become known by their own names in their own or other companies. Other designs were picked from portfolio drawings sold by unknown artists.

Francois was one such designer who joined Coro with his floral brooch designs in 1938. A special introductory advertisement featured his first line for Coro. Francois later marketed his jewelry under his own name, Francois.

Other notable Coro designers included Gene Verecchio, probably most famous for his design of the Quivering Camellia Duette *. His story was featured in the Vintage Fashion Costume Jewelry Club Newsletter in 2001. Several other designers are mentioned in the design patent applications by Coro, notably, Oscar Placco, Robert Geissmann, Massa Raimond. It was, however, not a custom at Coro to mark individual jewelry with a designer's name except in rare instances.

Adolph Katz, as the design director for Coro, was probably the single largest influence in creating the look for which Coro became known and popular with the jewelry buying public.

The Styles:

Well known designs for Coro, and much in demand by collectors today, are the double clips which could be combined into one brooch, trademarked as Coro Duette. The mechanism for the Duette was patented in 1931. This mechanism varied in styling for each individual design but how the interlocking components functioned remained essentially unchanged. The Duette brooch and clips styles stayed popular throughout the 1940s. However, on the new lighter synthetic fabrics arriving after World War II, especially knits, the heavy clips proved impractical. By the early 1950s the fashion had faded considerably although clips were still being marketed in smaller and lighter versions.

It's hard to define a complete Coro look as Coro produced such a varity of jewelry. Coro collectors who like the classic designs can usually recognize Coro jewelry among its many imitations. Coro workmanship and finish were outstanding even on its less expensive lines. Always striving for the pretty, feminine and romantic in expression, Coro jewelry was known for its delicate yet sturdy construction, its florals and figurals.

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, to compete with Monet and Trifari, especially, Coro launched several quite high-priced (even more so for that time) lines of jewelry to be sold in fine specialty stores.

Trifari may have pioneered the socalled jellybelly jewelry with carved Lucite centers, but Coro soon followed with its own figurals, also with Lucite centers, and later also with colored glass centers. Coro figurals from this era are today highly treasured by collectors.

Trifari had copied the multi-color precious stone jewelry by Cartier, it became known as fruit salad among collectors. Coro followed with its own versions, some very similar to Trifari's, others quite innovative using socalled carved glass stones.

During World War II Coro contributed many patriotic jewelry styles, notably the Emblem Of The Americas brooch, one example of which was seen at the Vintage Fashion & Costume Jewelry Convention in Rhode Island, in October, 2001, which Convention is covered in a reportage on this site.

Romantic styles, inspired by Victorian classic motifs, first took popular hold in the late 1930s, a counterpoint to the straight lines of Deco-styled jewelry which had been popular since the 1920s. After World War II, florals and romantic, even whimsical motifs, still reigned and florished until well into the late 1950s. Coro established itself as the main producer of this popular style jewelry.

The Manufacturing and Marketing:

Selecting designs for Coro was one thing, selling them was another. An able sales director, Royal Marcher, saw to the distribution of Coro mark jewelry. He did it so well that in 1929, Cohn & Rosenberger felt confident to invest in a brand-new factory. They selected Providence, Rhode Island, which since the 18th century had held prominence as one of the main hubs for jewelry manufacturing in the United States.

The new Coro factory was the largest and most state-of-the-art costume jewelry manufacturing plant in the world. At the height of its operation, more than 3,500 employees produced Coro jewelry there.

In 1929, the infamous New York stock market crash reduced many companies to ashes. Not Coro. Boldly, Cohn & Rosenberger instead issued a public stock offering. They repeated it with another public stock offering in 1945, an end-of-war year. Both moves would have appeared to go against anyone's better judgment but these actions resulted in Coro staying in business, even expanding, whereas many other companies did not.

Coro branched out as well. Corocraft was one branch opened in England in 1933. In spite of war and hardships, the success of Coro marched on. By 1952, Coro maintained showrooms in all the top U.S. and Canadian cities. The heyday for Coro production lasted through the mid-1950s.

The Jewelry Lines and Marks:

Coro's mainstay products consisted of cast jewelry although stampings were also used. Coro marketed many so called lines of jewelry. Unique names were invented for the different lines depending on which type store would be selling them. Some stores would sell, or carry one or several lines but not certain others, and vice versa.

The name and/or mark of each line was only important at that time for this reason:

A store that sold, say, Coro-marked jewelry, was not allowed to carry Vendome mark jewelry. Vendome was Coro's better line, more costly. A better store would carry Vendome but would not want Coro [mark] because by the early 1950s it had come to represent a cheaper line.

The later Coro lines, from 1950s and on, with the Coro mark on them, were only sold in general department stores. Better specialty stores such Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Lord & Taylor, Dillard's, Bloomingdale's, Gum's, and other fine stores, would carry Vendome, Corocraft, Coro Sterling Craft but not plain Coro. These lines were pricier to appeal to the specialty store customer.

But not necessarily all lines were produced at the Coro plant, some were made by other manufacturing contractors, such as the Hedison Co. in Providence. Some lines were even imported, including lower-priced items with a Coro hangtag which also had the country of origin printed on the reverse.

The Decline:

By the end of the 1950s Coro's well was running dry, however. In 1957, Richton International Corp. of New York bought the American assests of Coro, Inc., and continued producing jewelry in Providence.

New fashion trends in jewelry, to bloom in the 1960s, included beads. Although Coro jewelry was still well represented in stores and purchased by many women who liked it, the company was heavily invested in stampings, castings, rhinestones and accompanying components, thus not ready for a switch to beads.

Coro imported bead jewelry from other countries to compete but the U.S. casting manufacturing production suffered as a result. By the early 1970s Coro had lost its market dominance to bead fashions and to other competition such as Monet, a company that had the world market cornered on socalled tailored jewelry, i.e. plain gold [look] styles without stones, suitable for every day and business wear. In the 1970s, competition from the Asian countries Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, also cut deeply into Coro market share.

Coro, still by owned by Richton International, tried everything to recoup its market share but finally called it quits in 1979, after 78 years in business. The Canadian branches of Coro, Inc. continued manufacturing operations well into the 1990s. It is not known exactly which year Coro ceased operations in Canada although 1998 has been mentioned by some sources. At one time it was rumoured that Coro, Inc. would continue to produce jewelry in Mexico but this has not been confirmed to this writer. Updated information from informed readers is welcomed.

Coro information was obtained from www.jewelcollect.org

Please remember that the items in Little Secrets Vintage are in fact vintage, and thus are neither new nor in mint condition. While many are in exemplary condition, all were previously loved by someone else, and while not perfect each is full of old history and charm. Please use photos to make your decisions, be sure to ask any questions you may have, and read my policies before buying so you can have a wonderful experience with Little Secrets Vintage. Please refer to the IMPORTANT INFORMATION in the Additional Policies and FAQs!

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(32)

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If there are additional items (e.g., gift packaging, upgrades, etc.) be sure to add that to your comments section and I will send you and invoice.

I do offer layaway on full price items (on-sale and price reduced items are not eligible for layaway) with a 50% non-refundable deposit. The full amount must be paid within 30 days of the original date of sale. If the full amount is not paid within the 30 days the sale will be cancelled. Layaway deposits are not refundable.

If you live in Texas I will have to charge sales tax. As far as taxes in other states, I honestly have no idea. Etsy seems to be adding it on automatically, even though it was my understanding that micro-businesses didnt charge tax for out of state shipments. If you get charged a sales tax, I'm sorry. It's not me. Etsy is adding it.

Returns & exchanges

I don't accept returns, exchanges, or cancellations
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.
Returns and exchange details
Vintage items ARE NOT RETURNABLE. Please be certain of your purchase before making it as ALL SALES ARE FINAL.

In the event your vintage item arrives damaged, you should immediately take it to your post office, in the original packaging, and make them aware.

Shipping policies

PACKAGING: Please note the following:
With the exception of large items that require special handling, I ship all purchases at no cost to you, my wonderful patrons :-).

Out of respect to our environment, whenever possible I use recycled packaging. If you would prefer gift boxes, please let me know and I will happily use a necklace, ring, bracelet or my signature floral boxes for your purchase. However, please note that some of my larger items simply will not fit in a designer box. If that is the case, and you have requested a gift box, I will let you know and offer you a refund of your purchase.

I ship within 1-5 business days of your purchase. If any delay is anticipated, I will advise you immediately. PLEASE NOTE: I DO NOT include insurance; however, I strongly encourage you to consider it. Please note that should you choose to not insure your purchase I am not responsible for it's loss or damage once it leaves my studio.

I will be happy to ship international to all countries; however, the least expensive way to ship is USPS, which is still very expensive. If you would like me to ship to any other country please send me a message before you check out and I will let you know the cost. I can also ship priority and domestic overnight to other countries. If you are interested in this, please let me know and I will see if overnight is available in your area (not always possible to get overnight depending on zip code) and let you know the costs of both choices.

I do not ship international packages as gifts.
PACKAGING: Please note the following:
With the exception of large items that require special handling, I ship all purchases at no cost to you, my wonderful patrons :-).

Out of respect to our environment, whenever possible I use recycled packaging. If you would prefer gift boxes, please let me know and I will happily use a necklace, ring, bracelet or my signature floral boxes for your purchase. However, please note that some of my larger items simply will not fit in a designer box. If that is the case, and you have requested a gift box, I will let you know and offer you a refund of your purchase.

I ship within 1-5 business days of your purchase. If any delay is anticipated, I will advise you immediately. PLEASE NOTE: I DO NOT include insurance; however, I strongly encourage you to consider it. Please note that should you choose to not insure your purchase I am not responsible for it's loss or damage once it leaves my studio.

I will be happy to ship international to all countries; however, the least expensive way to ship is USPS, which is still very expensive. If you would like me to ship to any other country please send me a message before you check out and I will let you know the cost. I can also ship priority and domestic overnight to other countries. If you are interested in this, please let me know and I will see if overnight is available in your area (not always possible to get overnight depending on zip code) and let you know the costs of both choices.

I do not ship international packages as gifts.

Additional policies

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: While there are no requisite uses for the jewelry items offered on this website, the implied intent is for you, my beloved patrons, to include them as a part of your jewelry collection for sentimental value; to feel better about yourself; to express your personality; be modern & up-to-date; make a good first impression; look professional at work; and to make others stop in their tracks and stare at you for your amazing taste!

Furthermore, while I take great pleasure in frequently including a section on the history, myth, legend and lore of many of my pieces, this information is for entertainment purposes only.

No guarantees or warranties are implied or claimed regarding the healing, magical, psychic or health powers, virtues, genuineness, effectiveness, or whether or not any specific result will be obtained.

Nothing contained on this website is intended to diagnose physical or psychological conditions, prescribe or perform medical treatment, or interfere or substitute with the treatment of medical or other professionals.

The information provided herein, and the items sold on this website, are provided and sold with the understanding that this website does not have the intention of giving medical, psychological, or any other type of professional advice, nor is the information contained on this website or the items sold meant to be a replacement for traditional professional advice and/or treatment.

The information contained on this website and the items sold might not be suitable for your own personal circumstances, and you are solely responsible for deciding whether any of our information, products or services are suitable for your purposes. Visitors to this website and those who purchase items on this website use this information and the items at their own risk, and the website assumes no responsibility or liability whatsoever for any actions taken by visitors to this website or purchasers of items on this website.

Much of the information on this website has been provided by third parties over which the website has no control. For this information, and for any other information offered herein, the website has used reasonable efforts to verify the accuracy of this information provided, but no warranty, expressed or implied, is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information.

So, please note that this website and it owners and agents are not liable for any direct, incidental, consequential, indirect, or punitive damages arising from your access to or use of this Site or any contents on this Site.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION: While there are no requisite uses for the jewelry items offered on this website, the implied intent is for you, my beloved patrons, to include them as a part of your jewelry collection for sentimental value; to feel better about yourself; to express your personality; be modern & up-to-date; make a good first impression; look professional at work; and to make others stop in their tracks and stare at you for your amazing taste!

Furthermore, while I take great pleasure in frequently including a section on the history, myth, legend and lore of many of my pieces, this information is for entertainment purposes only.

No guarantees or warranties are implied or claimed regarding the healing, magical, psychic or health powers, virtues, genuineness, effectiveness, or whether or not any specific result will be obtained.

Nothing contained on this website is intended to diagnose physical or psychological conditions, prescribe or perform medical treatment, or interfere or substitute with the treatment of medical or other professionals.

The information provided herein, and the items sold on this website, are provided and sold with the understanding that this website does not have the intention of giving medical, psychological, or any other type of professional advice, nor is the information contained on this website or the items sold meant to be a replacement for traditional professional advice and/or treatment.

The information contained on this website and the items sold might not be suitable for your own personal circumstances, and you are solely responsible for deciding whether any of our information, products or services are suitable for your purposes. Visitors to this website and those who purchase items on this website use this information and the items at their own risk, and the website assumes no responsibility or liability whatsoever for any actions taken by visitors to this website or purchasers of items on this website.

Much of the information on this website has been provided by third parties over which the website has no control. For this information, and for any other information offered herein, the website has used reasonable efforts to verify the accuracy of this information provided, but no warranty, expressed or implied, is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability, or usefulness of any information.

So, please note that this website and it owners and agents are not liable for any direct, incidental, consequential, indirect, or punitive damages arising from your access to or use of this Site or any contents on this Site.

FAQs

As often as possible I will include the carat weight on precious stones, as well as the karat weight on gold in the descriptions; however, this will only be when I already have the information from a reliable jeweler. As I am not a jeweler I cannot remove stones from settings to provide carat weights, nor do I have a jewelers scale to provide accurate gold weight.
I have tried to put sizing details in the descriptions; however, if you have any additional questions please drop me a convo.
The items in my shop range from 20 to more than 100 years old. Any cleaning or polishing should be done with great care, and very gently.
Out of respect to our environment, whenever possible I use recycled packaging. If you would prefer gift boxes, please let me know and I will happily use a necklace, ring, bracelet or my signature floral boxes for your purchase. However, please note that some of my larger items simply will not fit in a designer box. If that is the case, and you have requested a gift box, I will let you know and offer you a refund of your purchase.
With the exception of large items that require special handling, I ship all purchases at no cost to you, my wonderful patrons :-).

I ship within 1-5 business days of your purchase. If any delay is anticipated, I will advise you immediately. PLEASE NOTE: I DO NOT include insurance; however, I strongly encourage you to consider it. Please note that should you choose to not insure your purchase I am not responsible for it's loss or damage once it leaves my studio.

Vintage CORO Rhinestone Bib Necklace, Art Deco Rhinestone Bib Necklace, Gorgeous Rhinestone Necklace, Bridal Jewelry, Formal Necklace

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$159.95

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1930s
  • Necklace length: 15.5 Inches
  • Can be personalized: No
  • Recycled: No
  • Style: Art deco
  • Number of strands: 1
  • Adjustable length: No
  • Spinner: No
  • Raw stone: No
  • Materials: Rhinestones, Metal
  • Feedback: 32 reviews
  • Favorited by: 12 people
  • Gift wrapping and message available
    Details
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No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order. See return policy

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