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Rare French Medal/Plaque Dated 1913. Commemorating The Birth Of Famous French Scientist Claude Bernard.

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Description

Original French Medal/Plaque of 1913 Commemorating The Birth Of Famous French Scientist Claude Bernard.

This interesting white metal plaque measures 4.1/4 inches by 3.1/8th inches (11cm x 8cm) and is in very fine condition.
The obverse is in finely detailed high relief and depicts Claude Bernard wearing the legion of honor medal around his neck. It is signed by the medal designer A.Borrel and is dated 1913.
The reverse gives his date of birth and death. It also gives his memberships of the French Acadamies of France, Science and Medicine. It depicts that he was also a Professor of the College of France, The Faculty of Science and The Museum Of Natural History.
The medal is of excellent quality and in nice condition. (Fully guaranteed to be genuine and authentic).
Claude Bernard was one of the most famous and admired French scientists. For more information see below.

Mailing cost from France to the U.K. by standard airmail will be 2.50p
I ALSO SHIP WORLDWIDE

INFORMATION
CLAUDE BERNARD
Born: Jul 12, 1813 at Saint-Julien
Died: Feb 10, 1878 (at age 64) at Paris
Nationality: French
Famous For: Physiology
Claude Bernard was a French physiologist who was a pioneer in the introduction of blind experiments and the discovery of homeostasis. As a result, he became one France’s best known scientists. The course of Bernard’s professional career was not always smooth, and at times his experiments even caused friction within his own family.
Early Life
Bernard was born into a poor family in Saint-Julien. During his simple education, he wanted to be an author. By the time he was 21, he had written a few plays, but they got horrible reviews from the critics and he decided to try a different line of work.
Bernard enrolled at the Paris Faculty of Medicine, but he was not a good student. He barely obtained his degree in 1843. In 1847, he was accepted as the assistant of the famous but controversial physiologist, François Magendie.
Bernard agreed with Magendie’s unpopular opinion that bodily reactions were suitable for study in a similar way to inorganic matter. Under his superior’s tutelage, Bernard made – and later designed – extensive experiments. He later inherited Magendie’s title as Professor of Experimental Medicine when he died. Bernard, showing more organizational flair than his predecessor, started to attract attention from the scientific community at large.
Experimentation and Controversy
Bernard was fascinated with the mechanics of digestion. He made a number of experiments in which he made openings into the stomachs of live animals in order to study their workings. This brought him considerable opposition from those who were opposed to vivisection, a group which also included several members of Bernard’s own family.
However, his experimentation did result in a number of important discoveries, including the finding that the small intestine played a key role in the digestive process. His experimentation also helped show the significance of the pancreas.
In 1857, Bernard discovered glycogen, the large molecule found in animals’ livers which acts as a reserve store of carbohydrates and helps to regulate blood sugar. Since glycogen was created out of multiple smaller molecules, Barnard demonstrated that animals’ digestions did not work in the same way as those of plants, which were only able to break large molecules into smaller component pieces. Instead, they could work in the other direction as well by creating those large molecules out of simpler substances.
Other Work and Later Life
Bernard also studied the nervous system, realizing that the actions of blood vessels were regulated by particular nerves. He believed that the movement of these vessels was necessary in order for the body to regulate its temperature efficiently. This, he said, explained why people appeared paler when the weather was cold and redder when it was warm. While engaged in this research, Bernard also made the important discovery that oxygen was carried around the body by the red corpuscles in an animal’s blood.
Taken together, Bernard’s findings showed that bodily equilibrium was largely the product a coherent internal force rather than the organs in the body working entirely separately. In 1865, he published a highly respected textbook. Four years later, he had become so renowned that he was elected to the French Academy and Napoleon III even made him a senator.
Upon his death in 1878, Bernard’s fame was such that he was granted a state funeral. This was an extremely rare honor for a man who was neither a military nor a political leader
Original French Medal/Plaque of 1913 Commemorating The Birth Of Famous French Scientist Claude Bernard.

This interesting white metal plaque measures 4.1/4 inches by 3.1/8th inches (11cm x 8cm) and is in very fine condition.
The obverse is in finely detailed high relief and depicts Claude Bernard wearing the legion of honor medal around his neck. It is signed by the medal designer A.Borrel and is dated 1913.
The reverse gives his date of birth and death. It also gives his memberships of the French Acadamies of France, Science and Medicine. It depicts that he was also a Professor of the College of France, The Faculty of Science and The Museum Of Natural History.
The medal is of excellent quality and in nice condition. (Fully guaranteed to be genuine and authentic).
Claude Bernard was one of the most famous and admired French scientists. For more information see below.

Mailing cost from France to the U.K. by standard airmail will be 2.50p
I ALSO SHIP WORLDWIDE

INFORMATION
CLAUDE BERNARD
Born: Jul 12, 1813 at Saint-Julien
Died: Feb 10, 1878 (at age 64) at Paris
Nationality: French
Famous For: Physiology
Claude Bernard was a French physiologist who was a pioneer in the introduction of blind experiments and the discovery of homeostasis. As a result, he became one France’s best known scientists. The course of Bernard’s professional career was not always smooth, and at times his experiments even caused friction within his own family.
Early Life
Bernard was born into a poor family in Saint-Julien. During his simple education, he wanted to be an author. By the time he was 21, he had written a few plays, but they got horrible reviews from the critics and he decided to try a different line of work.
Bernard enrolled at the Paris Faculty of Medicine, but he was not a good student. He barely obtained his degree in 1843. In 1847, he was accepted as the assistant of the famous but controversial physiologist, François Magendie.
Bernard agreed with Magendie’s unpopular opinion that bodily reactions were suitable for study in a similar way to inorganic matter. Under his superior’s tutelage, Bernard made – and later designed – extensive experiments. He later inherited Magendie’s title as Professor of Experimental Medicine when he died. Bernard, showing more organizational flair than his predecessor, started to attract attention from the scientific community at large.
Experimentation and Controversy
Bernard was fascinated with the mechanics of digestion. He made a number of experiments in which he made openings into the stomachs of live animals in order to study their workings. This brought him considerable opposition from those who were opposed to vivisection, a group which also included several members of Bernard’s own family.
However, his experimentation did result in a number of important discoveries, including the finding that the small intestine played a key role in the digestive process. His experimentation also helped show the significance of the pancreas.
In 1857, Bernard discovered glycogen, the large molecule found in animals’ livers which acts as a reserve store of carbohydrates and helps to regulate blood sugar. Since glycogen was created out of multiple smaller molecules, Barnard demonstrated that animals’ digestions did not work in the same way as those of plants, which were only able to break large molecules into smaller component pieces. Instead, they could work in the other direction as well by creating those large molecules out of simpler substances.
Other Work and Later Life
Bernard also studied the nervous system, realizing that the actions of blood vessels were regulated by particular nerves. He believed that the movement of these vessels was necessary in order for the body to regulate its temperature efficiently. This, he said, explained why people appeared paler when the weather was cold and redder when it was warm. While engaged in this research, Bernard also made the important discovery that oxygen was carried around the body by the red corpuscles in an animal’s blood.
Taken together, Bernard’s findings showed that bodily equilibrium was largely the product a coherent internal force rather than the organs in the body working entirely separately. In 1865, he published a highly respected textbook. Four years later, he had become so renowned that he was elected to the French Academy and Napoleon III even made him a senator.
Upon his death in 1878, Bernard’s fame was such that he was granted a state funeral. This was an extremely rare honor for a man who was neither a military nor a political leader

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(324)
Reviewed by Dean McCarthy

Reviewed by Graham E. Loton
5 out of 5 stars
Feb 19, 2018
Excellent service. Very happy. Thank you.
Original British Great Exhibition Medal Of 1851. Queen Victoria & The Crystal Palace Depicted.

Reviewed by Graham E. Loton
5 out of 5 stars
Feb 4, 2018
First class service. Very happy with my purchase. Highly recommended seller. Thank you.
London International Exhibition Medal of 1862

Reviewed by Jonathan
5 out of 5 stars
Feb 3, 2018
It is a very fine moire ribbon - an excellent item for the serious collector. The service provided was fast and efficient and the price reasonable.
French Medal Ribbon For French WWI & WW2 Medal Militaire Bravery Medal

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Rare French Medal/Plaque Dated 1913. Commemorating The Birth Of Famous French Scientist Claude Bernard.

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1910s
  • Feedback: 324 reviews
  • Gift message available

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From France

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