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Reinhold craft and hobby book
by Voss, GFunther
Published by Reinhold Pub. Corp., New York (1963)
Measures 9x6 inches Weighs 1 lb 10 ounces

Condition: Good.
Solid orange boards are sturdy and solid. Beings a lighter color they have picked up the age dust and are also bumped. Gold gilt spine text and decoration.
Pages are remarkably clean, considering it is ex-libris. There is usual stamping both on first leafs and occasional middle/margins. Back endpapers have the cardholder and cards still intact - perfectly blank.

Written with a pleasing cadence and dedication to the the art of crafting, a pleasant read and a great source of inspiration.

CONTENTS
FOREWORD 13
A FIRM FOUNDATION *
THE CRAFTSMAN'S MATERIALS t7
Wood W
Its Structure and Nature 18
Mechanical properties of wood - structure of wood - grain - sapwood and heartwood
- working in wood: swelling and splitting - basic rules for working in wood
Defects and Diseases of Wood 20
Fungal attack - nail hardness - crooked grain
Natural Wood and Plywood 21
Veneers and laminated products-lumber-core plywood
Species of Wood 22
Spruce - fir - pi ne - larch - basswood - poplar - chestnut- alder- birch - wal nut - pear wood
- oak - ash - beech - maple - plumwood - hornbeam - boxwood
Metals 24
5
S H U M i i i iH M

The More Important Metals
Iron - aluminum - lead - zinc - tin - copper - brass - bronze - silver - gold U
Commercial Forms of Metal
9
Plastics
Synthetic resins - sheet plastics - plastic films - adhesives 28
Other Materials
30
THE CRAFTSMAN'S TOOLS
31
Woodworking Tools
Hammer-pliers-saws-boring tools-planes-chisels and gouges-carving knives-rasps
Small Hand Tools. Auxiliary Tools U
Nail set-scratch awl-bit gage- saw set-filing clamp - C-clamps-workbench and home­
made work top
Marking and Measuring
Metalworking Tools 4j
Scriber-center punch-pin punch-files-cold chisels - metal saw- snips-pliers-vise -
screwdrivers - hammers - wrenches - anvil - rivet tongs and rivet set - reamers - stakes
and special hammers - soldering equipment
Care of Tools 44
Storing tools: toolbox, tool board - tool maintenance - tools and their function - grinding
- setting saws
WHAT'S THAT? 49
A Short Glossary of Terms in Common Use Among Craftsmen
WITH HEART AND HAND 67
MADE OF WOOD 69
Hollow Forms: Bowls and Plates 0
Roughing out - carving the inside face - depth control - carving the outside face - surface
treatment - the oval - handles
Oval Shapes 74
Ornament "
6

BOOKBINDING
Paper and its properties ^
Bookbinding Tools
Sewing frame - clamping press t.
Preparing the Signatures
Folding the signatures - collating - glue and paste - folding the end sheets 126
Sewing with String and Tape
Preparing the frame - sewing the book - the kettle stitch 128
Preparing the Book for the Case
Gluing the back - trimming - rounding the back - shaping the back - the headbands *
Making the Case
Thebacklining-theboards-thebinding-half-binding-clothcorners-bindinnin 134
past.ng down theend sheets-the full cloth binding-binding|mater?a?s 9
Album Binding
Photo and record albums, files - the back lining - folding the leaves - tissue-paper - 2
closed binding - lacing - the open back
Passe-Partout W3
A DASH OF COLOR—WOVEN RUGS AND PRINTS 145
Batik
Materials - waxing - dyeing - removing the wax
Block Printing 148
Hand printing-positive prints-choice of colors-the printing process-motifs and fabrics
Screen Printing ^
The printing frame - masking out - printing - matching
152
Hand-Painted Fabrics
Liquid paints and crayons-stretching the material-transferring the design-textile paints
154
PtaiTweLng - a home-made loom - the heddle frame - beaming the warp - stretching the
warp - the weaving technique - the knotted rug - Gobelin and Kilim weaves
BRAIDING AND BASKET MAKING
From strand to surface - plaiting - plant fibres and their properties - treatment of the
materials
166
Braided Mats and Coiled Baskets haskets and bowls
Round forms - squares - rectangles - mats - co.led waste baskets
8

Weave and Circular Braiding
Braiding and stitching - nuiltistrand plaits - circular braiding
Baskets Made of Reeds and Wicker
The materials: rattan, willow twigs
Some Common Weaves
Pairing weave - three-ply coil
Making a Basket
The base - the walls - the foot - borders: woven, closed
Slab-Built Pottery
Slabs and coils - the modeling stand
170
in
m
CLAY IN THE POTTER'S HAND 180
180
Surface Treatment 183
Drying and firing
Ceramic Glazes 184
Materials - inside glazing - outside glazing - engobe - engobe techniques
Majolica or Faience 188
LAMPS 190
Floor and wall lamps - wooden bases - fittings and shade supports
Wiring the Lamp 193
Precautions - switch - connection to socket
Lamps in Metal, Glass and Clay 194
Lampshades 196
Shade supports and frames - pleated paper - silk shades - lined shades - parchment
shades - straw as a shade material - woven shades
MOSAICS 202
The tiled table - true mosaics - mosaic materials: glass and ceramic - the positive tech­
nique - the cement bed - the negative technique
HAND-MADE JEWELRY 207
Simple Necklaces and Bracelets 207
Pearls from the plant kingdom - wire ornaments - forming chain links

9

Earrings, Lockets and Pendants
Ceramic Ornaments
Ceramic reliefs: the mold, casting and glazing 2g
Brooches and Scarf Pins
The starting material: sheet metal - decorative techniques - attaching brooches 214
Enameling
Preliminary treatment of the base - preparation of the enamel - applying the enam* 214
flux - counter enamels - open firing - second firing - grinding and polishing ?S££
Damascene Work
An inlay technique for metals - engraving the base - the inlay *s
MORE SCOPE FOR PLAY
22}
THE DOLL'S HOUSE ARCHITECT L
225
Working drawings - list of materials
On the Site 221
Prefabricating the components-doors and windows - painting and papering-erecting the
walls - roof construction
Interior Decoration 234
Materials for furniture making - principles of construction - tables and chairs-shelving-
beds - couches - cabinets - sliding doors - drawers
Miniature Stores 242
The foundation - walls and shelving - the counter
HAND PUPPETS, MARIONETTES AND TIN FIGURES 248
248
Punch and Judy Theater
The stage: structure, curtain, lighting
SI
Puppet Heads
Papiermache heads - glued heads - carved heads
256
The Marionette Theater - Figures and Controller
The puppet skeleton - the controller
261
The Marionette Stage
Framework and lighting
263
The Parade of the Tin Soldiers
History in "tin"
10

Casting Tin Figures
Building a plaster mold - duplicating and assembling new figures
266
Painting the Figures
Historical accuracy
Collections and Dioramas 268
Displaying the figures
UNDER THE CHRISTMAS TREE 270
The Christmas Creche 270
Example of a rustic creche - structural components - an artificial landscape - the figures:
modeled and carved
The Christmas Pyramid 278
The single-tier pyramid - framework and platform - the fan-wheel - multi-tier pyramids -
figures carved from doweling
The Christmas Nutcracker 281
The Tinsel Angel 283
OUTDOOR HOBBIES 286
Archery 286
The best wood - the shape of the bow - bending the bow - arrows: tip, nock, feathers -
targets
The Crossbow 290
Stock and butt-the barrel-the bow-the trigger mechanism - sights
The Boomerang 296
Proportions - shape - throwing technique
Aerial Photography from Kites 299
The kite frame - the fabric - stabilizers - the camera mounting - releasing the shutter
LOW VOLTAGE FOR THE CRAFTSMAN 306
General Rules for Installations 307
Low-Voltage Power Sources 308
tett^rytranSf0rmer ~thG VOltaic Ce" " connection series and in parallel - the storage
Resistance
11

Installation of Stage Lighting ^
Strip lighting - side lights - switchboard
The Electric Bell 3
The electromagnet - principles - coll winding - switches - discontinuous and continuous
action
Alarm and Signal Devices
Burglar alarm - ground connection
318
The Relay and the Long Line «B
320
The Morse Station _
321
A PRIVATE WEATHER STATION ^
Wind Direction and Wind Strength 323
The combined wind-measuring instrument: weather vane and wind-strength indicator
Wind Indicator with Electrical Remote Reading 328
The Hy g rometer 331
The Rain Gage 333
NATURE HOBBIES 337
The Aquarium 337
Glass aquaria and frame aquaria - support for the lid
Bottom and Planting 339
Biological Balance 339
The Terrarium 340
Base with zinc tray - walls - lid
Interior of the Terrarium 344
Bottom, planting, water tanks, climbing "trees"
An Aviary in Your Home 346
Wire cages - the box cage and its construction: base, wire wall, lid
Nesting Boxes 349
Nesting boxes for different species - watering places
INDEX 353
12

FOREWORD
The best time of the day is surely the evening, a time of relaxation and recreation. For some
this simply means rest and passive entertainment, but for others it means a chance to
cultivate a skill or talent for which there may be no outlet in the daily routine of job and
office. It is for these, the active ones, that this book is intended.
The interests of the craftsman and hobbyist should not be confused with those of the
handyman, who is primarily concerned with material improvements to the home or garden.
Apart from any material ends, the craftsman takes his chief joy in the exercise of his imagi­
nation and creative powers, and there is a spirit of playfulness in his work which the handy­
man would find it hard to appreciate. Accordingly, our guide to the fascinating world of
crafts and hobbies does not take the form of a rigid set of rules and regulations, but of hints,
examples, and encouragement to each one to develop his own personal resources.
No one, however, can turn out really satisfactory work unless he is well informed about
tools and materials, and aware of the full possibilities of his chosen medium. For this
reason the early chapters of this book are devoted to a thorough discussion of craft prin­
ciples. The examples that follow do not call for an excessive amount of technical skill and
are not likely to prove too difficult even for complete beginners or children, particularly as
the descriptions are so clear and given in such detail.
Woodwork and metalwork, toy making, handmade jewelry, weaving, ceramics, electrical
gadgetry, and home-made aquaria are just a few of the many topics discussed within the
covers of the REINHOLD CRAFT AND HOBBY BOOK, a truly lavish source of interesting
ideas and useful tips and suggestions, with numerous illustrations, most of them in color,
that make even the trickiest operation easy to follow. May it bring you many hours of re­
warding leisure.
Gunther Voss

Reinhold craft and hobby book Voss, GFunther Reinhold Pub. Corp., New York (1963) Art & Craft Book ex-libres Hardcover Clean Craft Guide

$10.00

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1960s
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