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Char rope & tinder tube, aka slow match

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Description

Char rope in a tinder tube, aka a slow match. The tapered brass tubes are .50BMG cases from the scrap yard. I tumbled them to clean them, then trimmed the ends off in a lathe on a mandrel I made for the purpose. The five-eighths inch rope I bought years ago at a yard sale, thinking it would be useful someday. It feels like pure cotton; I laundered it a couple of times; it's very soft and easily holds an ember from a flint & steel. I whip finished the ends of the rope with some waxed twine I found on a spool at a yard sale (& added a dab of fly-tying cement). Thus these are made entirely (except for the dab of cement) from recycled/cast off materials.

I do not soak the rope in a saltpetre (potassium nitrate) solution. Though it is traditional for making slow match, as for matchlock rifles, I find that laundered cotton holds an ember just fine for fire starting.

To use it, pull the rope a little way out of the tube. Then proceed just as you would with char cloth: Place the end of the rope on your flint (or whatever, I use a piece of agate with sharp edges). Strike the flint with your steel, when the end of the rope catches some sparks, blow on it and soon the entire end will be glowing.

After you've started your fire, pull the rope about halfway back into the tube and place your thumb or finger over the end of the tube. The ember will glow for a short time and then, without any fresh air, will form a freshly charred surface, ready for your next fire. The brass tube barely gets warm in the time it takes the ember to burn out.

The price is $8 each. I have about ten, and could make another dozen or more if you needed a lot. It would be, maybe, a week before I got to it considering all my other projects.

My tinder tubes are pretty much the same as those offered by others in their Etsy stores, except for size. I don't think they are using such big cases or 5/8-inch rope. You may find the smaller shells would be a better fit in your survival tin. OR, if you are (for example) teaching, you may like the idea of the larger diameter rope & matching tube. Using search terms such as "tinder tube" or "slow match" will show you what some of the options are.

Thank you for looking!

P.S. The striker I am using in the photos is a Birka locality Viking reproduction by Wolf Creek Forge. You can find her strikers in her Etsy store; I have about five, they work great and I recommend her work.
Char rope in a tinder tube, aka a slow match. The tapered brass tubes are .50BMG cases from the scrap yard. I tumbled them to clean them, then trimmed the ends off in a lathe on a mandrel I made for the purpose. The five-eighths inch rope I bought years ago at a yard sale, thinking it would be useful someday. It feels like pure cotton; I laundered it a couple of times; it's very soft and easily holds an ember from a flint & steel. I whip finished the ends of the rope with some waxed twine I found on a spool at a yard sale (& added a dab of fly-tying cement). Thus these are made entirely (except for the dab of cement) from recycled/cast off materials.

I do not soak the rope in a saltpetre (potassium nitrate) solution. Though it is traditional for making slow match, as for matchlock rifles, I find that laundered cotton holds an ember just fine for fire starting.

To use it, pull the rope a little way out of the tube. Then proceed just as you would with char cloth: Place the end of the rope on your flint (or whatever, I use a piece of agate with sharp edges). Strike the flint with your steel, when the end of the rope catches some sparks, blow on it and soon the entire end will be glowing.

After you've started your fire, pull the rope about halfway back into the tube and place your thumb or finger over the end of the tube. The ember will glow for a short time and then, without any fresh air, will form a freshly charred surface, ready for your next fire. The brass tube barely gets warm in the time it takes the ember to burn out.

The price is $8 each. I have about ten, and could make another dozen or more if you needed a lot. It would be, maybe, a week before I got to it considering all my other projects.

My tinder tubes are pretty much the same as those offered by others in their Etsy stores, except for size. I don't think they are using such big cases or 5/8-inch rope. You may find the smaller shells would be a better fit in your survival tin. OR, if you are (for example) teaching, you may like the idea of the larger diameter rope & matching tube. Using search terms such as "tinder tube" or "slow match" will show you what some of the options are.

Thank you for looking!

P.S. The striker I am using in the photos is a Birka locality Viking reproduction by Wolf Creek Forge. You can find her strikers in her Etsy store; I have about five, they work great and I recommend her work.

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Char rope & tinder tube, aka slow match

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$8.00

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Brass, cotton rope, waxed twine
  • Gift message available
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From Spokane, WA

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