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SOLD - Vintage book RARE BEAUTIFUL The Poetical Works of Jean Ingelow, publisher Thomas Y Crowell's 1887 first edition, gilt engraved cover

SOLD - Vintage book RARE BEAUTIFUL The Poetical Works of Jean Ingelow, publisher Thomas Y Crowell's 1887 first edition, gilt engraved cover

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1800s
  • Favorited by: 26 people
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From New Haven, CT
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nootherbooklikethis
in New Haven, Connecticut

Description

NOTE: This book has been sold but I keep it up so someone interested can find it (like you!) so that I can know to look for it specifically for them. Of course it won't be the same book but I am good at and love the hunt for books, and can likely find you another copy of that same edition or another beautiful edition of the same book. :) Don't ever hesitate to contact me on sold listings, that's why they are here!

---

There is no other book like this one.

Really, I haven't been able to find it, which makes sense because this is a masterpiece of beauty and I cannot imagine this book would be anywhere else for sale, that anyone else would give it up and take it down from their shelves and give it to someone else, except for me :/ alas, that is my business.

The detail of the gorgeous cover and bright glinting-in-the-sunlight title decoration aside, this book is worth more than its looks. Jean Ingelow is a poet not too many in the general populace might know about--at least, not in the way that Wordsworth or Yeats come to mind. Still, that is true of many female poets, and Ingelow is no exception. She lived in London nearly all her life, which is and has always been rich fodder for poets to draw from to inform their words and visions. Her poetic career began under a pseudonym when she was a young girl, the male "Orris," but as she aged she assumed the right to put her own name to her own pieces, and Jean Ingelow the poet was born.

A friend of Alfred Lord Tennyson's, a famous poet whose name should be familiar to most especially in the poetic circles, Ingelow had a gift with writing on love and faith, how the two intersect and overlap or how they are as they stand alone. My favorite random writing of hers (and one is she is well known for) is the children's tale "Mopsa the Fairy," available here: http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/ingelow/mopsa/mopsa.html
which I've been trying to hunt down in hard copy for a while now. It just showcases her own personal magic, as does this collection, perfectly.

In this book--which came out in 1887 just ten years before her death--you have so many of her poems you feel you own her works entirely, and that is a great feeling. You just need to touch the book and you feel its weight, and that is the weight of her lifetime, the weight of her talent and ability to touch you just as you've touched the book itself. The poems included include (yes, I know that sounds weird but hey it's the English language and it works): "The Star's Monument (in the concluding part of a discourse on fame)" which goes, "If there be memory in the world to come/ If thought recur to some things silenced here/ Then shall the deep heart be no longer dumb/ But find expression in that happier sphere;" Just those first four lines and you've already found her discussing the afterlife and the reflections of a well-known person wondering if their acknowledgement and achievements in this life will carry over to the next, or if it will all be silenced, and if so, then he hopes his deep heart will be allowed to shine through and feel and express what it has not, because of his fame it is suggested, been able to do so in this life or "world." Just four lines into the poem! The next ones give me chills too, as it continues to say that then at least if this is the case in the next world he will be able to "speak without fault or fear,/ but utter to the harp the changes sweet/ Words that, forbidden still, then heaven were incomplete."

She is saying that heaven would be incomplete even with the words forbidden on this earth--either to him or in general, things you cannot say aloud but feel regardless--are what make heaven or the afterlife, the "next world" as she calls it, what it is. That is such a remarkable thought and statement for a woman who some might call pious, to suggest that the forbidden thoughts of this character coming out into the open is what will make the realm of the afterlife better, more wholly itself in its peace and freedom of expression of true feelings and thoughts.

And again, these are just eight verses of a longer poem. If you have not really dived into Jean Ingelow's works I assure you they are much the same, not in that the poems are the same, but in that you get those same meaningful contradictions and discussions, those same beautiful words and stories that illustrate what it means to be human. She is, in a sense, a perfect poet in that she knows exactly how to accomplish this, what reading poetry is all about and for, really.

Another poem showcases her writings on love, called "Binding Sheaves" and accompanied by a beautiful engraving sketch of a young woman holding strands of hay and talking to a young man bent over at work, but smiling up at her. He asks her what his love is worth to her and exclaims:

"Speech that cannot be forborne
Tells the story through:
I sowed my love in with the corn,
And they both grew.
Count the world full wide of birth,
And hived honey sweet,
But count the love of more worth
Laid at thy feet,"

Then she answers:

"Money's worth is house and land,
Velvet coat and vest,
Work's worth is bread in hand,
Ay and sweet rest.
Wilt thou learn what love is worth? Ah! she sits above,
Sighing, 'Weigh me not with earth,
Love's worth is love.'"

Doesn't that melt your heart?

I'll include one more favorite, but understand I tend toward the lighter subjects and Jean Ingelow writes almost exhaustingly on darker ones too, such as her "Story of Doom" and "Songs Written on the Deaths of Three Children," one poem for each, "Henry, aged eight years" "Samuel, aged nine years," and "Katie, aged five years." This one, though, is called "The Morning Watch (the coming in of the mermaiden)" and is one of her "Songs of the Night Watches" series.

"The moon is bleached as white as wool,
And just dropping under;
Every star is gone but three,
And they hand far asunder, --
There's a sea-ghost ll in gray,
A tall shape of wonder!

I am not satisfied with sleep, --
The night is not ended,
But look how the sea-ghost comes,
With wan skirts extended,
Stealing up in this weird hour,
When light and dark are blended.

A vessel: To the old pier-end
Her happy course she's keeping;
I heard them name her yesterday:
Some were pale with weeping;
Some with their heart-hunger sighed;
She's in--and they are sleeping. "

It continues on, and when you keep in mind the mermaiden she talks of is the sun, the morning coming in on the weary sailors who talked with hope for tomorrow last night before they fell asleep, some weeping and so downcast, and this one sailor is watching the sun rise and becomes excited for the hope that dawn will bring these men when they wake...well, you'll understand why this "Night Watch song" of hers is one of my favorites.

I can't describe the work in full of course, so you can check out this link for more information on Jean Ingelow and her masterful, lovely poetry if you wis: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/jean-ingelow

But, I implore you to buy the book and experience it yourself.

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: The Poetical Works of Jean Ingelow, including The Shepard Lady and Other Poems
-Author: Jean Ingelow
-Format: Hardcover, first edition, gilt cover/spine and carved color design all around, gilded page edges, has protective clear plastic cover that can be taken off, ink illustrations throughout
-Condition: Near mint. Signed by previous owner in penciled script, "M. L. Bind, Oct/1890." Otherwise, absolutely perfect for its age and hardly worn at all.
-Publisher: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. New York
-Copyright: T. Y. Crowell and Co. 1887
-Date published: 1887
-Provenance: Previously owned in 1890 by an "M. L. Bind." I picked it up in the classics section of a hole-in-the-wall bookstore near where I previously lived in Southern Connecticut. This was about three or four years ago (2012?)
-Pricing: I priced the book this way because it is just absolutely priceless. I know that's not true, but it is, in a sense. This book cannot be found for sale anywhere else, this edition is special compared to others, it is perfectly intact and even came with a protective cover to keep its beauty contained and safe from harm :) You will not find this book or any book like it (aka any other book so full of Ingelow's poetry) in this condition or in this beautiful design and print. These all entered into my calculations, and I also compared Thomas Y Crowell and Company's other works, such as one I previously sold of Whittier's poetry, to come to the final price.
NOTE: This book has been sold but I keep it up so someone interested can find it (like you!) so that I can know to look for it specifically for them. Of course it won't be the same book but I am good at and love the hunt for books, and can likely find you another copy of that same edition or another beautiful edition of the same book. :) Don't ever hesitate to contact me on sold listings, that's why they are here!

---

There is no other book like this one.

Really, I haven't been able to find it, which makes sense because this is a masterpiece of beauty and I cannot imagine this book would be anywhere else for sale, that anyone else would give it up and take it down from their shelves and give it to someone else, except for me :/ alas, that is my business.

The detail of the gorgeous cover and bright glinting-in-the-sunlight title decoration aside, this book is worth more than its looks. Jean Ingelow is a poet not too many in the general populace might know about--at least, not in the way that Wordsworth or Yeats come to mind. Still, that is true of many female poets, and Ingelow is no exception. She lived in London nearly all her life, which is and has always been rich fodder for poets to draw from to inform their words and visions. Her poetic career began under a pseudonym when she was a young girl, the male "Orris," but as she aged she assumed the right to put her own name to her own pieces, and Jean Ingelow the poet was born.

A friend of Alfred Lord Tennyson's, a famous poet whose name should be familiar to most especially in the poetic circles, Ingelow had a gift with writing on love and faith, how the two intersect and overlap or how they are as they stand alone. My favorite random writing of hers (and one is she is well known for) is the children's tale "Mopsa the Fairy," available here: http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/ingelow/mopsa/mopsa.html
which I've been trying to hunt down in hard copy for a while now. It just showcases her own personal magic, as does this collection, perfectly.

In this book--which came out in 1887 just ten years before her death--you have so many of her poems you feel you own her works entirely, and that is a great feeling. You just need to touch the book and you feel its weight, and that is the weight of her lifetime, the weight of her talent and ability to touch you just as you've touched the book itself. The poems included include (yes, I know that sounds weird but hey it's the English language and it works): "The Star's Monument (in the concluding part of a discourse on fame)" which goes, "If there be memory in the world to come/ If thought recur to some things silenced here/ Then shall the deep heart be no longer dumb/ But find expression in that happier sphere;" Just those first four lines and you've already found her discussing the afterlife and the reflections of a well-known person wondering if their acknowledgement and achievements in this life will carry over to the next, or if it will all be silenced, and if so, then he hopes his deep heart will be allowed to shine through and feel and express what it has not, because of his fame it is suggested, been able to do so in this life or "world." Just four lines into the poem! The next ones give me chills too, as it continues to say that then at least if this is the case in the next world he will be able to "speak without fault or fear,/ but utter to the harp the changes sweet/ Words that, forbidden still, then heaven were incomplete."

She is saying that heaven would be incomplete even with the words forbidden on this earth--either to him or in general, things you cannot say aloud but feel regardless--are what make heaven or the afterlife, the "next world" as she calls it, what it is. That is such a remarkable thought and statement for a woman who some might call pious, to suggest that the forbidden thoughts of this character coming out into the open is what will make the realm of the afterlife better, more wholly itself in its peace and freedom of expression of true feelings and thoughts.

And again, these are just eight verses of a longer poem. If you have not really dived into Jean Ingelow's works I assure you they are much the same, not in that the poems are the same, but in that you get those same meaningful contradictions and discussions, those same beautiful words and stories that illustrate what it means to be human. She is, in a sense, a perfect poet in that she knows exactly how to accomplish this, what reading poetry is all about and for, really.

Another poem showcases her writings on love, called "Binding Sheaves" and accompanied by a beautiful engraving sketch of a young woman holding strands of hay and talking to a young man bent over at work, but smiling up at her. He asks her what his love is worth to her and exclaims:

"Speech that cannot be forborne
Tells the story through:
I sowed my love in with the corn,
And they both grew.
Count the world full wide of birth,
And hived honey sweet,
But count the love of more worth
Laid at thy feet,"

Then she answers:

"Money's worth is house and land,
Velvet coat and vest,
Work's worth is bread in hand,
Ay and sweet rest.
Wilt thou learn what love is worth? Ah! she sits above,
Sighing, 'Weigh me not with earth,
Love's worth is love.'"

Doesn't that melt your heart?

I'll include one more favorite, but understand I tend toward the lighter subjects and Jean Ingelow writes almost exhaustingly on darker ones too, such as her "Story of Doom" and "Songs Written on the Deaths of Three Children," one poem for each, "Henry, aged eight years" "Samuel, aged nine years," and "Katie, aged five years." This one, though, is called "The Morning Watch (the coming in of the mermaiden)" and is one of her "Songs of the Night Watches" series.

"The moon is bleached as white as wool,
And just dropping under;
Every star is gone but three,
And they hand far asunder, --
There's a sea-ghost ll in gray,
A tall shape of wonder!

I am not satisfied with sleep, --
The night is not ended,
But look how the sea-ghost comes,
With wan skirts extended,
Stealing up in this weird hour,
When light and dark are blended.

A vessel: To the old pier-end
Her happy course she's keeping;
I heard them name her yesterday:
Some were pale with weeping;
Some with their heart-hunger sighed;
She's in--and they are sleeping. "

It continues on, and when you keep in mind the mermaiden she talks of is the sun, the morning coming in on the weary sailors who talked with hope for tomorrow last night before they fell asleep, some weeping and so downcast, and this one sailor is watching the sun rise and becomes excited for the hope that dawn will bring these men when they wake...well, you'll understand why this "Night Watch song" of hers is one of my favorites.

I can't describe the work in full of course, so you can check out this link for more information on Jean Ingelow and her masterful, lovely poetry if you wis: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/jean-ingelow

But, I implore you to buy the book and experience it yourself.

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: The Poetical Works of Jean Ingelow, including The Shepard Lady and Other Poems
-Author: Jean Ingelow
-Format: Hardcover, first edition, gilt cover/spine and carved color design all around, gilded page edges, has protective clear plastic cover that can be taken off, ink illustrations throughout
-Condition: Near mint. Signed by previous owner in penciled script, "M. L. Bind, Oct/1890." Otherwise, absolutely perfect for its age and hardly worn at all.
-Publisher: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co. New York
-Copyright: T. Y. Crowell and Co. 1887
-Date published: 1887
-Provenance: Previously owned in 1890 by an "M. L. Bind." I picked it up in the classics section of a hole-in-the-wall bookstore near where I previously lived in Southern Connecticut. This was about three or four years ago (2012?)
-Pricing: I priced the book this way because it is just absolutely priceless. I know that's not true, but it is, in a sense. This book cannot be found for sale anywhere else, this edition is special compared to others, it is perfectly intact and even came with a protective cover to keep its beauty contained and safe from harm :) You will not find this book or any book like it (aka any other book so full of Ingelow's poetry) in this condition or in this beautiful design and print. These all entered into my calculations, and I also compared Thomas Y Crowell and Company's other works, such as one I previously sold of Whittier's poetry, to come to the final price.

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(62)

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FAQs

Absolutely! I'm willing to do anything to get this book to you, but I will not write on it. If it is not in the condition you want, I know preservation techniques and will certainly oblige as best I can. You just need to let me know.
I will wrap the book any way you want. It is special and so are you, you deserve it! I will also write cards, include photographs, anything you'd like that would make this transaction more, well, you.
I won't tell you how to care for your book, but as to how they are cared for now, they are housed in two places -- some are wrapped in plastic in my main room in the part of the house that used to be a quaint B&B, lined on lovely old wooden bookshelves; others are stacked in piles or leaning on cool, creative and different bookends all round the room, and all are given care, attention, and kept away from my dog :)

Others sit in my library, in built-in authentic 1800s wooden and glass-door library shelves that line the walls in a secluded room in a historic home on the shore. With vintage, warm lamplights over the tiny marble fireplace, the library's windows catch plenty of sunlight--the books are in good homes and will arrive undamaged.
If the book comes later than expected this does not mean it was sent late. Every book is sent within 1-3 business days, unless one of the days is a Sunday, then it could be an extra day. This applies to International orders as well, but they might take longer to get to you than in-country orders. If there is a problem, please bring it up with UPS or see Etsy's policies.
I am more than willing to hunt down a specific book for you. This can take time, however, and would be a matter of personal back-and-forth on the site so you would have to keep in contact. There is no guarantee. I'm good at finding things however, and if I cannot find it to sell to you myself I will direct you to where I can find it online, if I can.

Important to note, however, that I may have it in my holdings already so it ALWAYS helps to check in with me. Listings come up continually, and it may just be waiting here to get processed and put up.
Contact me directly via the site and I will do my absolute best to help correct it. There should be no problems.
Always willing to make new friends and take on new jobs or opportunities -- this business does not stop me from working a full or part time job, and I am currently looking, so please contact me! Dempseylynch@gmail.com. I am definitely interested in talking with you and love meeting new people (especially book lovers of course).
Sure! Although the books are priced the way they are and are worth that amount based on a lot of factors (condition compared to others available online, if there are any available online or if it is the only one, age and whether it is signed or special in some way, etc.) I am always willing to hear you out as to why you think the books price is off, and work with you as best I can. I cannot guarantee the price will change, that is bad for my business, but I will listen to you. Don't be afraid to reach out. The worst that can happen is I will say no.

I put the reasons behind my pricing method for each item at the end of the listing so check that out if you're curious too :)

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