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SOLD - Vintage book BEAUTIFUL First Edition, An Endless Chain by "Pansy" (Isabella Macdonald Alden), rare antique 1884 part of famous series

SOLD - Vintage book BEAUTIFUL First Edition, An Endless Chain by "Pansy" (Isabella Macdonald Alden), rare antique 1884 part of famous series

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1800s
  • Favorited by: 9 people
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Description

NOTE: This book has been sold but I keep it up so someone interested can find it (like you!) so that I can know to look for it specifically for them. Of course it won't be the same book but I am good at and love the hunt for books, and can likely find you another copy of that same edition or another beautiful edition of the same book. :) Don't ever hesitate to contact me on sold listings, that's why they are here!

---

There is no other book like this one.

No, really. This one is the FIRST EDITION of a book that was subsequently printed under a different title three years later, and is an antiquarian treasure as it is so rare to be under the original title and the first edition / first print (1884 not 1887, where it was then known by "Workers Together - or An Endless Chain" or "Workers Together - An Endless Chain." This one is just An Endless Chain. There's something exciting about that, isn't there? Like this book is the real one, the true one that she meant to put out, then its title was changed for whatever reason when it was reissued. Just the fact of this makes it stand alone among even its own other copies--it is the true original.

The price I've picked is lower than it should be, as the first couple pages have age-stains(foxing) on the top edges, but the rest of the book (mostly all of it) is without any marks like this at all. It is truly a preserved masterpiece. :)

The story of the author is nearly as important to know as the story you are buying to read, so I'll start with her. Going by the pseudonym "Pansy," the author Isabella MacDonald Alden (COOL NOTE: She was Grace Livingston Hill's aunt! Another famous and prolific author, if you aren't familiar) wrote various series of books for children and what we would now call YA. One of her most famous surrounded the life of a character called Ester Reid, whose coming-of-age had a moral edge yet mirrored many of the women growing up in that time when women were expected to behave a certain way--when in fact, everyone was expected to behave a certain way, as gentlemen and gentlewomen, with the fear of God in them and their faith shining at all times. Ester Reid is one example of a young girl growing up in this time, and another series of Pansy's, The Chautauqua Girls, had a similar feel throughout, though the characters themselves are spunky and relatable in their own way.

What's most interesting about this volume is it is the one book which is said to connect the two series--it belongs to neither, but brings the two together in overlapping ways, An Endless Chain does, just like a chain itself. This makes the work special even among the other works of Pansy's, of which there were...a ton. Just, a ton. She was very prolific, Isabella MacDonald Alden.

"Pansy Books" include several series and standalone novels, so altogether they are described on the first inside page in this way:

"Probably no living author has exerted an influence upon the American people at large at all comparably with Pansy's. Thousands upon thousands of families read her books every week, and the effect in the direction of right feeling, right thinking, and right living is incalculable." A list of her many, many books to the time of this book's printing then follow, categorized under their different prices, such as this one under the category "Price, $1.50." Crazy, right?

This story specifically follows the life of a new superintendent at the "Packard Palace Sabbath-School," where he holds views opposed to those of the teachers there, and where he decides that learning the children's names and praying for them, teaching them on a more personal level, is what is right. This is not what Miss Mason, who teaches the girls, wants to hear, and not what she wants to practice--it goes against her own traditional ways of thinking and teaching, and so the conflict arises.

The superintendent whose story we follow, Dr. Everett, also has family issues to attend to, especially concerning his father, and his own righteous views to impart on the students and teachers at the school he has inherited and now runs. The interaction between the girls and Dr. Everett are most interesting to read, to me, but I'll leave the rest alone for you to discover yourself when you buy and read the book.

The book's premise aside, here are a few quotes to give you a sense of the style of writing and subject of the novel:

--"I can go home alone at ten o'clock as well as at any other time."
"But aren't you afraid to do that, when the city is so full of bad people?" Joy could not keep the sense of having been shocked out of her tones. But the girl laughed. "What good would it do to be afraid?" she asked. "We girls have to go from the store at midnight often, during the holiday season. We have to go home after dark every winter night of our livesl and nine times out of ten something happens to hinder one or two of us, until eight or nine o'clock or later. Were's the good of being cowardly about it? Poor folks, you see, have to get used to things. I used to be awful skittish at first, though," she added, as if in sympathy with Joy's ladies, "but nobody ever hurt me."
Was that true? Joy wondered. Had not the forced exposure to the streets, and the cars, and the crowds, hurt her face, and manner, and heart?

--Doctor Everett, who was occupying a lounge in another corner of the room, watched with curious interest the limp bundle, sunk in the depths of one of the large chairs. It looked so unlike the fresh young man who had gone out in the morning, confident in his ability to conquer the world, the flesh and the devil.
"Did it go hard with you?" he asked.
And then young Parks became aware for the first time that he was not alone in the room.
"Confoundedly hard!" he said bitterly, without changing his position, for her recognized the voice.
Doctor Everett came to a sitting posture, and then presently drew a chair, and set it near, but not too near, the one in which Robert lounged.
"Tell us about it," he said, in a soothingly sympathetic tone.
And Robert, who had not meant to do any such thing, began at the beginning and told the whole exasperating story of that exasperating day, increasing in tone and fervor as his anger rose in recalling his torments--a hundred little pricks and stings, finished off by this actual bite, of a serious nature.
...Not for Robert Parks' benefit at all, but rather because of a habit the doctor had of thinking aloud, he at this moment, in a sort of dreamy undertone, repeated the words; "As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten; be zealous, therefore, and repent."
For the moment, he had forgotten the presence of the one who had started this train of thought, and was not prepared for the instant effect which his quotation had. Young Parks came to an erect posture, his head lifted haughtily, a glow of anger on his cheeks, his voice sharp:
"Doctor, I may as well admit frankly that I don't want any such love as that. A hundred years of it wouldn't do me any good. I can't be driven, and I won't be. Whoever supposes that I am to be 'chastened' into improvement is very much mistaken. I should go to the dogs quicker in that way than in any other in the world, I very believe.
I've tried all my life to be a decent sort of fellow; but if I am to be paid for it by being chastened, as you are pleased to call it, I'll soon show everybody that that sort of thing won't do for me. I won't repent of anything.

The fervor of the young Robert Parks matched against the confused faith of the also-young Doctor Everett who Parks finds himself oddly admiring at times is compelling to read, just as equally as the girls and their interactions.

I implore you to buy the book and read the rest of it for yourself :)

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: An Endless Chain
-Series title: Pansy Stories
-Author Pseudonym: Pansy
-Author True Name: Isabella MacDonald Alden
-Format: Hardcover, First Edition, shining gilt and carved ink detail on front and spine, bright emerald cover, black and white pictured frontispiece protected from title page (and vice versa) by aged but preserved wax sheet
-Condition: Surprisingly good and bound together, needs to be handled gently but still impressively conserved. Wear to binding and edges, but only minor, and the age-stains are only on the top two corners of the front pages and do not go throughout the entire book. Only writing/mark is a neat and beautifully scripted signature for "Herbert E. Peck" on the first blank page in light pencil.
-Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company, Franklin Street
-Copyright: D. Lothrop and Company, 1884
-Date published: 1884
-Provenance: Picked this up for a good price in a bookstore that had a HUGE classics section at generally good prices. This was last month when I was going through a "I WANT ALL OF THE BEAUTIFUL BOOKS IN THE WORLD FOR MYSELF" phase. :) So November 2016 in CT.
-Pricing: I priced the book this way because it is the only one available out there, the last relic of this book and story, and as I've said, the only one of its kind as it is the first, under its original title, and printed much earlier than the other copies that purport to be first copies under different titles. Because it is also written by a famous author as part of a famous series of books, it is valuable in itself in any edition, and reading through the book its worth is evident; with the beauty of its cover and gilt detail still rich and shining today and the fact it is from 1884 all entered into my decision. The only reason it is priced less than it deserves to be, is that it has age-stains on the top corners of the front pages.
NOTE: This book has been sold but I keep it up so someone interested can find it (like you!) so that I can know to look for it specifically for them. Of course it won't be the same book but I am good at and love the hunt for books, and can likely find you another copy of that same edition or another beautiful edition of the same book. :) Don't ever hesitate to contact me on sold listings, that's why they are here!

---

There is no other book like this one.

No, really. This one is the FIRST EDITION of a book that was subsequently printed under a different title three years later, and is an antiquarian treasure as it is so rare to be under the original title and the first edition / first print (1884 not 1887, where it was then known by "Workers Together - or An Endless Chain" or "Workers Together - An Endless Chain." This one is just An Endless Chain. There's something exciting about that, isn't there? Like this book is the real one, the true one that she meant to put out, then its title was changed for whatever reason when it was reissued. Just the fact of this makes it stand alone among even its own other copies--it is the true original.

The price I've picked is lower than it should be, as the first couple pages have age-stains(foxing) on the top edges, but the rest of the book (mostly all of it) is without any marks like this at all. It is truly a preserved masterpiece. :)

The story of the author is nearly as important to know as the story you are buying to read, so I'll start with her. Going by the pseudonym "Pansy," the author Isabella MacDonald Alden (COOL NOTE: She was Grace Livingston Hill's aunt! Another famous and prolific author, if you aren't familiar) wrote various series of books for children and what we would now call YA. One of her most famous surrounded the life of a character called Ester Reid, whose coming-of-age had a moral edge yet mirrored many of the women growing up in that time when women were expected to behave a certain way--when in fact, everyone was expected to behave a certain way, as gentlemen and gentlewomen, with the fear of God in them and their faith shining at all times. Ester Reid is one example of a young girl growing up in this time, and another series of Pansy's, The Chautauqua Girls, had a similar feel throughout, though the characters themselves are spunky and relatable in their own way.

What's most interesting about this volume is it is the one book which is said to connect the two series--it belongs to neither, but brings the two together in overlapping ways, An Endless Chain does, just like a chain itself. This makes the work special even among the other works of Pansy's, of which there were...a ton. Just, a ton. She was very prolific, Isabella MacDonald Alden.

"Pansy Books" include several series and standalone novels, so altogether they are described on the first inside page in this way:

"Probably no living author has exerted an influence upon the American people at large at all comparably with Pansy's. Thousands upon thousands of families read her books every week, and the effect in the direction of right feeling, right thinking, and right living is incalculable." A list of her many, many books to the time of this book's printing then follow, categorized under their different prices, such as this one under the category "Price, $1.50." Crazy, right?

This story specifically follows the life of a new superintendent at the "Packard Palace Sabbath-School," where he holds views opposed to those of the teachers there, and where he decides that learning the children's names and praying for them, teaching them on a more personal level, is what is right. This is not what Miss Mason, who teaches the girls, wants to hear, and not what she wants to practice--it goes against her own traditional ways of thinking and teaching, and so the conflict arises.

The superintendent whose story we follow, Dr. Everett, also has family issues to attend to, especially concerning his father, and his own righteous views to impart on the students and teachers at the school he has inherited and now runs. The interaction between the girls and Dr. Everett are most interesting to read, to me, but I'll leave the rest alone for you to discover yourself when you buy and read the book.

The book's premise aside, here are a few quotes to give you a sense of the style of writing and subject of the novel:

--"I can go home alone at ten o'clock as well as at any other time."
"But aren't you afraid to do that, when the city is so full of bad people?" Joy could not keep the sense of having been shocked out of her tones. But the girl laughed. "What good would it do to be afraid?" she asked. "We girls have to go from the store at midnight often, during the holiday season. We have to go home after dark every winter night of our livesl and nine times out of ten something happens to hinder one or two of us, until eight or nine o'clock or later. Were's the good of being cowardly about it? Poor folks, you see, have to get used to things. I used to be awful skittish at first, though," she added, as if in sympathy with Joy's ladies, "but nobody ever hurt me."
Was that true? Joy wondered. Had not the forced exposure to the streets, and the cars, and the crowds, hurt her face, and manner, and heart?

--Doctor Everett, who was occupying a lounge in another corner of the room, watched with curious interest the limp bundle, sunk in the depths of one of the large chairs. It looked so unlike the fresh young man who had gone out in the morning, confident in his ability to conquer the world, the flesh and the devil.
"Did it go hard with you?" he asked.
And then young Parks became aware for the first time that he was not alone in the room.
"Confoundedly hard!" he said bitterly, without changing his position, for her recognized the voice.
Doctor Everett came to a sitting posture, and then presently drew a chair, and set it near, but not too near, the one in which Robert lounged.
"Tell us about it," he said, in a soothingly sympathetic tone.
And Robert, who had not meant to do any such thing, began at the beginning and told the whole exasperating story of that exasperating day, increasing in tone and fervor as his anger rose in recalling his torments--a hundred little pricks and stings, finished off by this actual bite, of a serious nature.
...Not for Robert Parks' benefit at all, but rather because of a habit the doctor had of thinking aloud, he at this moment, in a sort of dreamy undertone, repeated the words; "As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten; be zealous, therefore, and repent."
For the moment, he had forgotten the presence of the one who had started this train of thought, and was not prepared for the instant effect which his quotation had. Young Parks came to an erect posture, his head lifted haughtily, a glow of anger on his cheeks, his voice sharp:
"Doctor, I may as well admit frankly that I don't want any such love as that. A hundred years of it wouldn't do me any good. I can't be driven, and I won't be. Whoever supposes that I am to be 'chastened' into improvement is very much mistaken. I should go to the dogs quicker in that way than in any other in the world, I very believe.
I've tried all my life to be a decent sort of fellow; but if I am to be paid for it by being chastened, as you are pleased to call it, I'll soon show everybody that that sort of thing won't do for me. I won't repent of anything.

The fervor of the young Robert Parks matched against the confused faith of the also-young Doctor Everett who Parks finds himself oddly admiring at times is compelling to read, just as equally as the girls and their interactions.

I implore you to buy the book and read the rest of it for yourself :)

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: An Endless Chain
-Series title: Pansy Stories
-Author Pseudonym: Pansy
-Author True Name: Isabella MacDonald Alden
-Format: Hardcover, First Edition, shining gilt and carved ink detail on front and spine, bright emerald cover, black and white pictured frontispiece protected from title page (and vice versa) by aged but preserved wax sheet
-Condition: Surprisingly good and bound together, needs to be handled gently but still impressively conserved. Wear to binding and edges, but only minor, and the age-stains are only on the top two corners of the front pages and do not go throughout the entire book. Only writing/mark is a neat and beautifully scripted signature for "Herbert E. Peck" on the first blank page in light pencil.
-Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company, Franklin Street
-Copyright: D. Lothrop and Company, 1884
-Date published: 1884
-Provenance: Picked this up for a good price in a bookstore that had a HUGE classics section at generally good prices. This was last month when I was going through a "I WANT ALL OF THE BEAUTIFUL BOOKS IN THE WORLD FOR MYSELF" phase. :) So November 2016 in CT.
-Pricing: I priced the book this way because it is the only one available out there, the last relic of this book and story, and as I've said, the only one of its kind as it is the first, under its original title, and printed much earlier than the other copies that purport to be first copies under different titles. Because it is also written by a famous author as part of a famous series of books, it is valuable in itself in any edition, and reading through the book its worth is evident; with the beauty of its cover and gilt detail still rich and shining today and the fact it is from 1884 all entered into my decision. The only reason it is priced less than it deserves to be, is that it has age-stains on the top corners of the front pages.

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FAQs

Absolutely! I'm willing to do anything to get this book to you, but I will not write on it. If it is not in the condition you want, I know preservation techniques and will certainly oblige as best I can. You just need to let me know.
I will wrap the book any way you want. It is special and so are you, you deserve it! I will also write cards, include photographs, anything you'd like that would make this transaction more, well, you.
I won't tell you how to care for your book, but as to how they are cared for now, they are housed in two places -- some are wrapped in plastic in my main room in the part of the house that used to be a quaint B&B, lined on lovely old wooden bookshelves; others are stacked in piles or leaning on cool, creative and different bookends all round the room, and all are given care, attention, and kept away from my dog :)

Others sit in my library, in built-in authentic 1800s wooden and glass-door library shelves that line the walls in a secluded room in a historic home on the shore. With vintage, warm lamplights over the tiny marble fireplace, the library's windows catch plenty of sunlight--the books are in good homes and will arrive undamaged.
If the book comes later than expected this does not mean it was sent late. Every book is sent within 1-3 business days, unless one of the days is a Sunday, then it could be an extra day. This applies to International orders as well, but they might take longer to get to you than in-country orders. If there is a problem, please bring it up with UPS or see Etsy's policies.
I am more than willing to hunt down a specific book for you. This can take time, however, and would be a matter of personal back-and-forth on the site so you would have to keep in contact. There is no guarantee. I'm good at finding things however, and if I cannot find it to sell to you myself I will direct you to where I can find it online, if I can.

Important to note, however, that I may have it in my holdings already so it ALWAYS helps to check in with me. Listings come up continually, and it may just be waiting here to get processed and put up.
Contact me directly via the site and I will do my absolute best to help correct it. There should be no problems.
Always willing to make new friends and take on new jobs or opportunities -- this business does not stop me from working a full or part time job, and I am currently looking, so please contact me! Dempseylynch@gmail.com. I am definitely interested in talking with you and love meeting new people (especially book lovers of course).
Sure! Although the books are priced the way they are and are worth that amount based on a lot of factors (condition compared to others available online, if there are any available online or if it is the only one, age and whether it is signed or special in some way, etc.) I am always willing to hear you out as to why you think the books price is off, and work with you as best I can. I cannot guarantee the price will change, that is bad for my business, but I will listen to you. Don't be afraid to reach out. The worst that can happen is I will say no.

I put the reasons behind my pricing method for each item at the end of the listing so check that out if you're curious too :)

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