Whoa! You can't favorite your own shop.

Whoa! You can't buy your own item.

Whoa! You can't favorite your own item.

Whoa! You can't add your own item to a list.

Add this item to a treasury!

Close
You don't have any treasuries yet. Enter a title below to create one.
Close

This item has been added.

View your treasury.

Original mezzotint print - "Stripy Cat Bottom" - cat washing, Art print in black & white / monochrome. Art by Nancy Farmer

Like this item?

Add it to your favorites to revisit it later.
Favorite

Description

'Stripy Cat Bottom'
Original miniature Mezzotint print by Nancy Farmer (me). Mezzotint is a beautiful but obscure and time-consuming way of making a handmade print. For an explanation of the technique, see 'What is a Mezzotint?' below. Each print is hand made, so there will be small variations from print to print.

The Story
A Stripy Cat, and his bottom! This is that typical leg-in-the-air pose of a cat washing, understood by all people with cats.

Size & Media
Image size is about 3.25 inches / 8 cm square.
This miniature Mezzotint is signed, titled at the bottom. It has no edition number because I have not numbered this edition, though the prints are still limited by the fact that the aluminium plate used to make them lasts only for about 20 or 30 prints. The print will be nicely presented, wrapped in cellophane and on a board but It is unframed and un-mounted (un-matted). If you would like to purchase this in a frame or a mount, please send me a message and I can give you some options. I can cut a mount for you at only a small extra charge, but the extra size usually puts up the cost of shipping, so I don't do it as standard.

What is a Mezzotint?
Mezzotint is an intaglio printmaking process, but a rather obscure and very labour intensive one! If you don't know what Intaglio is, see the explanation below this one...
Mezzotint is actually a form of engraving. You start wit a metal plate (in this case aluminium), which is smooth and flat, and the surface of this plate is worked over with a mezzotint 'rocker'. This looks a little bit like a very wide chisel, except that the cutting end of it is slightly curved, so that it can be rocked side to side, and instead of a smooth sharp blade it has a series of teeth along its cutting edge. The effect of rocking it over the surface is that a series of indentations and burrs are worked onto the surface of the plate. The rocker is then rocked back across the plate in different directions until the entire surface is covered in burrs and indentations.
The surface of the metal is 'roughed-up' like this all over. If you were to put ink on the plate and print from it at this stage (as in any intaglio process), the surface would hold a lot of ink and it would print totally black.
That is the starting point for mezzotint. After that you can begin to actually create the image. This is done by using burnishers and scrapers to smooth and scrape at areas of the roughened surface. A burnisher is a highly polished hard steel tool, which smooths and polishes the roughened areas, similar to running over the surface with the back of a spoon, only a lot more delicate. A scraper has an edge on it and will literally scrape off the surface of the metal, if you need to get back to an even smoother surface.
Very smooth areas of the plate will not hold ink, and will subsequently print white, or very light. Slightly rougher areas will hold a little ink and will print a little darker, and so on, right back to the very rough areas that will print very black. And that is how the image is built up on the plate. For the actual printing process, see below.

What is Intaglio?
Intaglio includes various printing techniques such as engraving, etching and mezzotint. All this group of printmaking involves the making of incisions, pits, grooves, rough areas etc in a flat (usually) metal plate. An image is built up with these marks that are recessed into the plate. When the plate is ready to print, thick, sticky ink is spread across the whole surface of the plate so that it runs into the recessed areas. The surface of the plate is then wiped more-or-less clean of ink, very carefully, so that the ink remains in the recessed areas.
The actual print is then made by laying the plate face-up on the steel bed of a printing press, putting a sheet of paper on top, then several very specialized blankets on top of that, and the whole thing is then rolled underneath a steel roller at high pressure. The paper (which has usually been softened by soaking in water prior to printing) is squeezed into the recesses of the plate, picking up the ink and the image is transferred onto the paper. To make another print, the whole process of inking up and wiping off must be done again. It is not a quick process!
The Intaglio technique is the opposite of techniques such as lino-cutting and woodcut, where a print is made by running a roller across the lino or woodblock, and the ink is transferred onto the high points of the surface. There is no wiping-off stage and hight points print dark while recesses remain white. And it's also why intaglio requires a higher pressure than lino cutting and woodcut.
I hope I have explained this as clearly as I can. Anyone curious please feel free to send me a message and I will direct you to my blog, which has pictures!

Prints of my artwork:
Digital prints of my paintings may be found in my other Etsy shop: http://www.nancyfarmer.etsy.com - this is a second shop I have set up in order to list original work which I have for sale. I do not sell digital prints of my handmade prints.

About me:
I am a self-employed artist living in Somerset, UK. If you would like to see more of my work take a look at www.nancyfarmer.gallery and www.nancyfarmer.net, and if you have any questions I can be contacted by sending a message through Etsy or at mail(at)nancyfarmer.net . I am happy to consider commissions, and would also be happy to list to order anything on Etsy which is not already in my shop, if I have it available.
'Stripy Cat Bottom'
Original miniature Mezzotint print by Nancy Farmer (me). Mezzotint is a beautiful but obscure and time-consuming way of making a handmade print. For an explanation of the technique, see 'What is a Mezzotint?' below. Each print is hand made, so there will be small variations from print to print.

The Story
A Stripy Cat, and his bottom! This is that typical leg-in-the-air pose of a cat washing, understood by all people with cats.

Size & Media
Image size is about 3.25 inches / 8 cm square.
This miniature Mezzotint is signed, titled at the bottom. It has no edition number because I have not numbered this edition, though the prints are still limited by the fact that the aluminium plate used to make them lasts only for about 20 or 30 prints. The print will be nicely presented, wrapped in cellophane and on a board but It is unframed and un-mounted (un-matted). If you would like to purchase this in a frame or a mount, please send me a message and I can give you some options. I can cut a mount for you at only a small extra charge, but the extra size usually puts up the cost of shipping, so I don't do it as standard.

What is a Mezzotint?
Mezzotint is an intaglio printmaking process, but a rather obscure and very labour intensive one! If you don't know what Intaglio is, see the explanation below this one...
Mezzotint is actually a form of engraving. You start wit a metal plate (in this case aluminium), which is smooth and flat, and the surface of this plate is worked over with a mezzotint 'rocker'. This looks a little bit like a very wide chisel, except that the cutting end of it is slightly curved, so that it can be rocked side to side, and instead of a smooth sharp blade it has a series of teeth along its cutting edge. The effect of rocking it over the surface is that a series of indentations and burrs are worked onto the surface of the plate. The rocker is then rocked back across the plate in different directions until the entire surface is covered in burrs and indentations.
The surface of the metal is 'roughed-up' like this all over. If you were to put ink on the plate and print from it at this stage (as in any intaglio process), the surface would hold a lot of ink and it would print totally black.
That is the starting point for mezzotint. After that you can begin to actually create the image. This is done by using burnishers and scrapers to smooth and scrape at areas of the roughened surface. A burnisher is a highly polished hard steel tool, which smooths and polishes the roughened areas, similar to running over the surface with the back of a spoon, only a lot more delicate. A scraper has an edge on it and will literally scrape off the surface of the metal, if you need to get back to an even smoother surface.
Very smooth areas of the plate will not hold ink, and will subsequently print white, or very light. Slightly rougher areas will hold a little ink and will print a little darker, and so on, right back to the very rough areas that will print very black. And that is how the image is built up on the plate. For the actual printing process, see below.

What is Intaglio?
Intaglio includes various printing techniques such as engraving, etching and mezzotint. All this group of printmaking involves the making of incisions, pits, grooves, rough areas etc in a flat (usually) metal plate. An image is built up with these marks that are recessed into the plate. When the plate is ready to print, thick, sticky ink is spread across the whole surface of the plate so that it runs into the recessed areas. The surface of the plate is then wiped more-or-less clean of ink, very carefully, so that the ink remains in the recessed areas.
The actual print is then made by laying the plate face-up on the steel bed of a printing press, putting a sheet of paper on top, then several very specialized blankets on top of that, and the whole thing is then rolled underneath a steel roller at high pressure. The paper (which has usually been softened by soaking in water prior to printing) is squeezed into the recesses of the plate, picking up the ink and the image is transferred onto the paper. To make another print, the whole process of inking up and wiping off must be done again. It is not a quick process!
The Intaglio technique is the opposite of techniques such as lino-cutting and woodcut, where a print is made by running a roller across the lino or woodblock, and the ink is transferred onto the high points of the surface. There is no wiping-off stage and hight points print dark while recesses remain white. And it's also why intaglio requires a higher pressure than lino cutting and woodcut.
I hope I have explained this as clearly as I can. Anyone curious please feel free to send me a message and I will direct you to my blog, which has pictures!

Prints of my artwork:
Digital prints of my paintings may be found in my other Etsy shop: http://www.nancyfarmer.etsy.com - this is a second shop I have set up in order to list original work which I have for sale. I do not sell digital prints of my handmade prints.

About me:
I am a self-employed artist living in Somerset, UK. If you would like to see more of my work take a look at www.nancyfarmer.gallery and www.nancyfarmer.net, and if you have any questions I can be contacted by sending a message through Etsy or at mail(at)nancyfarmer.net . I am happy to consider commissions, and would also be happy to list to order anything on Etsy which is not already in my shop, if I have it available.

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(58)
Reviewed by cathryncaraccio
5 out of 5 stars
Mar 31, 2018
Beautiful and unusual, makes me smile and compliments my other crow picture from Nancy. Always fast and efficient service, thank you once again Nancy xx
Original Etching: 'Medusa, Scarecrow' - Medusa and the crows, from an edition of 18 prints.

Reviewed by Farver
5 out of 5 stars
Mar 26, 2018
These Devils are having waaaay too much fun. This wonderful etching has a playful, tongue-in-cheek quality that I love! Nancy ships fast. I highly recommend her. Many thanks.
Original Etching: 'The Diabolical Dance' - from a series of original drypoint prints about Glastonbury Tor - a one-off proof print

Reviewed by roboldhck
5 out of 5 stars
Feb 20, 2018
The painting arrived in a protected package with no problems. Communication was excellent. I felt as if I was given the same care as was given to making the piece of art work. Attention to detail a priority. The whole experience was a pleasant part of my day. I will enjoy it immensely with cheerful memories of the experience. Absolutely charming.
Curious fairy on an Arum Lily: 'Pistils & Stamens 3'- Flower Fairy art by Nancy Farmer, botanical. (unframed)

Payments

Secure options
  • Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Etsy keeps your payment information secure. Etsy shops never receive your credit card information.
As well as Etsy's credit card facility, I can accept PayPal payments in American Dollars, Pounds Sterling, and Euros.
I also accept payments by cheque (check) or Postal Orders, provided they are in Pounds Sterling ONLY. If you wish to pay by bank transfer, this is also possible, but please note that if the bank is not a UK bank you may be charged a fee, and international bank transfers aren't usually a good way of sending small payments.

Returns & exchanges

I will accept returns if you contact me within 14 days of receiving the item. I will refund the cost of the item but not the shipping unless the item is also damaged when you receive it or not as described. I will also refund in full any item that is lost in the post.

Shipping policies

Originals will always be shipped with tracking. Royal Mail is the carrier I usually use, Special Delivery within the UK (or Parcelforce for larger items), Royal Mail Airmail (Track & Trace) outside the UK.

Original mezzotint print - "Stripy Cat Bottom" - cat washing, Art print in black & white / monochrome. Art by Nancy Farmer

Ask a question
$38.68
Don't wait. There's only 1 of these available.

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: mezzotint print, paper
  • Feedback: 58 reviews
  • Favorited by: 4 people
  • Gift message available

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 1–3 business days
From United Kingdom

You may also like

What’s wrong with this listing?

The first thing you should do is contact the seller directly.

If you’ve already done that, your item hasn’t arrived, or it’s not as described, you can report that to Etsy by opening a case.

Report a problem with an order

We take intellectual property concerns very seriously, but many of these problems can be resolved directly by the parties involved. We suggest contacting the seller directly to respectfully share your concerns.

If you’d like to file an allegation of infringement, you’ll need to follow the process described in our Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy.

Review how we define handmade, vintage and supplies

See a list of prohibited items and materials

Read our mature content policy

The item for sale is…