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Vintage book Princess Daisy by Judith Krantz, beautiful First Edition 1980, classic romantic story fraught with controversy and complexities

Vintage book Princess Daisy by Judith Krantz, beautiful First Edition 1980, classic romantic story fraught with controversy and complexities

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  • Vintage item from the 1980s
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nootherbooklikethis
in New Haven, Connecticut

Description

There is no other book like this one, darling.

;-*

Judith Krantz may be a writer known to you. She still writes today, and her works have been very popular. This one, however, stands out among the rest, and is known as one of her most popular. I, for one, was drawn to the cover of this first edition, and when I read what it was about I was even more intrigued, despite Krantz's works not necessarily being "for me" if you will.

The novel tells the story of Princess Marguerite Valensky, daughter of Prince Alexander Valensky, a famous Russian polo player who married an American actress Francesca Vernon and had a daughter they call "Daisy." Daisy's life is not the main focus of the novel in the beginning, which I find refreshing. The second you are wrapped up in the love story and trials of the marriage between Francesca and Prince Alexander, you are suddenly given an abrupt switch in focus to their daughter, the lucky one of the twins that survives "intact" from Francesca's pregnancy. Danielle, the second, is wracked with illness and is brain-damaged, something the Prince cannot stand and the beautiful actress mother cannot come to terms with, pushing her into a post-partum depression. Then out of nowhere Francesca flees with the twins after her depression passes, understanding that the Prince does not intend for his "abnormal" daughter to live, and that is how Daisy gets her start in the world--on the run from a world-renown Prince and all the power his station yields. The Prince, also called "Stash," does get infrequent visits with Daisy, but she is brought up in a strange situation from the start, and so you are rapt with her story as much as you are rapt with her mother's.

But why is the novel then called Princess Daisy? Why is she the one character that stands above the rest? Well, I won't give it all away but her story is up and down, and when it is up it is only just up, and when it is down it is deeply, darkly down. You follow her distresses and wonder how in the world she can endure them, and all the while she is caring for Danielle, her bosom-sister who needs her more than anything. You admire the Princess, she has a strong heart built into her character and she is both elegant and beautiful and hardworking and caring of others. As she spends her life outside of the public eye, privately a Princess undiscovered while she grows and matures, you wonder if she will forever be a secret, struggling, "poor young thing."

But then, of course, she is discovered. There is a Princess living in the shadows, and suddenly the light finds her. That is what turns this tale from the beginnings of a hard life to the fulfillment of one, from tragedies to adventure, from the ups and downs of life to the, well, even greater ups and downs in an entirely different sense of reality than she (and we) is used to up till then.

It's where the fun starts.

Here's a conversation between Daisy and her friends, and later Daisy and a man named Shannon, that will give you a sense of what I mean:

"What have we here?" she exclaimed, looking Shannon over. "A distinctly tall and rather gorgeous American? That does make for a pleasant change. Why is his hair so black and his eyes so blue? But, of course, it's Irish blood. I must be getting old not to see that immediately. Daisy, couldn't you find an American who looked like an American--rather blond and bland? I've always heard about them, but I've never seen a specimen. Perhaps they don't exist? Never mind--we'll make do with this nice, big, beautiful one. Come in, children, and have some sherry."
"You're a terrible flirt," said Shannon.
"Nonsense, I've never flirted in my life. I have always been dreadfully misunderstood," Anabel said, with that laugh that had half-seduced every man who heard it. The red of her shiny hair was fading and she had grown thinner but, as she led them through the salon out to the terrace overlooking the sea, it was uncanny to see with what gentle strokes time seemed to have touched La Maree and its owner. Daisy's heart leaped as she thought how this place, this haven, at least, could never be taken away from Anabel."

"As they walked back, up the steep hill of the Cote de Grace, Shannon was thoughtful. He'd never talked as much about his early years. He sensed that he'd left out something, missed some essential connections. But all he could find to explain himself to Daisy was his favorite quotation from his durable sage.
"Listen--this is the way I feel about life--George Bernard Shaw said it. 'People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can't find them, they make them." He had stopped walking as he spoke.
"Is that your motto too?" she asked.
"Yes. What do you think of it?"
"It's almost probably half true... which isn't at all bad for a motto," she said. "You might try to give me a kiss... there's no one to see us."
He kissed her for a long moment and Daisy felt that she was growing around him as a climbing rose grows around a sturdy arbor.
"Am I a 'circumstance'?" she murmured.
"You are a silly question." He pulled her braids. "I'll race you back."

This is just one part of the book that gets to me--that she is the center of attention but we learn so much about the many other characters who surround her, who interact with her, who take interest in her. It feels at times we don't know her at all, and then sometimes it feels we know her too well, that we ARE her, in a sense. The book is powerful in that way, and cements Judith Krantz as a good storyteller, despite my not knowing many of her other works. This one, I know for a fact at least, is special.

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: Princess Daisy
-Author: Judith Krantz
-Format: Hardcover, First Edition (stated), full color dust jacket with portrait of woman on front, black and white portrait photograph of author full on back, inside endpapers yellow flower design, green boards and white spine/binding
-Condition: Roughness on inside front dust jacket you can see in the pictures, but otherwise this book is in near mint condition! Red mark on top, seems to be from a marker but just a line over the pages, no idea what it means or where it came from, but not prominent. I didn't notice it at first and only saw it now going over the book to write this!
-Publisher: Crown Publishers, Inc. New York
-Copyright: Steve Krantz Productions, 1980
-Date published: 1980
-Provenance: I got this from a library donation cart, actually, where they had a cute little sign saying "please donate 10 cents per book" so of course I gave them a little bit more money for the books I picked out, I couldn't give a library ten cents for a book, but still it was after-hours outside the Friends of the Library Store at this city library which was detached from the main library, and usually the store is run during the time the library is open but they do have different hours. This isn't a place I normally am in (more middle Connecticut) so I took advantage of visiting the library because I'm a geek like that, and I'd been looking for jobs at the time though it was far away, so scoping all this out I went to the Friends bookstore sad to find it closed, then this cart was there! I should say it was bigger than just a cart, it was like a full stack on both sides of books like you'd find at your normal library and it took a bit for me to get through, and there were a TON of books from the 80s and 90s, which I'm not so well versed in as to their worth, so I spent a lot of time there by myself, the night growing darker and darker and my not noticing (probably not a good idea for a girl alone in an unfamiliar city, but the place was covered by an overhang and absolutely no one walked in or was near it since it was in the parking lot of the library facing out from the back, but still). When I saw this cover I was stunned by the beauty captured by the artist of the main character, Princess Daisy, and any stories about princesses will catch my attention, but this one especially caught it when I read the inside synopsis on the jacket. I picked it up along with a few others, dropped my change into the donation box like a little jewelry box posted at the top of the stacks, and went home. Only later did I realize, reading it, what a great story it was, and how much I wanted to share it with someone. So here's to sharing it with you! So that's where it came from but as to the previous owner there is an impression marked into the pages the way people used to do, stamped in, you know? It is a circle that says "DRA" and the outside of the circle says "Library of Diane R. Arnold." So, of course, I had to look up who this was, but I was left fruitless. There are a few Diane R Arnolds living in Connecticut, all older (listed as 65+) and I cannot figure out which one it is, as they are all within driving distance of the city the library is in. So, all we know is it was donated to the library by a Diane R Arnold from middle Connecticut in December 2016 or earlier, as that was when I picked this book up for the first time. :)
-Pricing: I priced this book based on its condition, mainly, because it is in much better shape than the other ones selling out there. It is not too expensive as it is from the 80s so there are other copies elsewhere for less, but this one is certainly in great condition and you should buy it from me rather than take a chance on the others, ones that state they are first editions but show no pictures, or ones that are from listings that are otherwise not as thorough or seem trustworthy as this one. The book started at a price generally around the same that it is selling at elsewhere in all other respects, but it is worth more than many of the other listings would have you think. So, be careful is all I can say if you don't buy this gorgeous book here!
There is no other book like this one, darling.

;-*

Judith Krantz may be a writer known to you. She still writes today, and her works have been very popular. This one, however, stands out among the rest, and is known as one of her most popular. I, for one, was drawn to the cover of this first edition, and when I read what it was about I was even more intrigued, despite Krantz's works not necessarily being "for me" if you will.

The novel tells the story of Princess Marguerite Valensky, daughter of Prince Alexander Valensky, a famous Russian polo player who married an American actress Francesca Vernon and had a daughter they call "Daisy." Daisy's life is not the main focus of the novel in the beginning, which I find refreshing. The second you are wrapped up in the love story and trials of the marriage between Francesca and Prince Alexander, you are suddenly given an abrupt switch in focus to their daughter, the lucky one of the twins that survives "intact" from Francesca's pregnancy. Danielle, the second, is wracked with illness and is brain-damaged, something the Prince cannot stand and the beautiful actress mother cannot come to terms with, pushing her into a post-partum depression. Then out of nowhere Francesca flees with the twins after her depression passes, understanding that the Prince does not intend for his "abnormal" daughter to live, and that is how Daisy gets her start in the world--on the run from a world-renown Prince and all the power his station yields. The Prince, also called "Stash," does get infrequent visits with Daisy, but she is brought up in a strange situation from the start, and so you are rapt with her story as much as you are rapt with her mother's.

But why is the novel then called Princess Daisy? Why is she the one character that stands above the rest? Well, I won't give it all away but her story is up and down, and when it is up it is only just up, and when it is down it is deeply, darkly down. You follow her distresses and wonder how in the world she can endure them, and all the while she is caring for Danielle, her bosom-sister who needs her more than anything. You admire the Princess, she has a strong heart built into her character and she is both elegant and beautiful and hardworking and caring of others. As she spends her life outside of the public eye, privately a Princess undiscovered while she grows and matures, you wonder if she will forever be a secret, struggling, "poor young thing."

But then, of course, she is discovered. There is a Princess living in the shadows, and suddenly the light finds her. That is what turns this tale from the beginnings of a hard life to the fulfillment of one, from tragedies to adventure, from the ups and downs of life to the, well, even greater ups and downs in an entirely different sense of reality than she (and we) is used to up till then.

It's where the fun starts.

Here's a conversation between Daisy and her friends, and later Daisy and a man named Shannon, that will give you a sense of what I mean:

"What have we here?" she exclaimed, looking Shannon over. "A distinctly tall and rather gorgeous American? That does make for a pleasant change. Why is his hair so black and his eyes so blue? But, of course, it's Irish blood. I must be getting old not to see that immediately. Daisy, couldn't you find an American who looked like an American--rather blond and bland? I've always heard about them, but I've never seen a specimen. Perhaps they don't exist? Never mind--we'll make do with this nice, big, beautiful one. Come in, children, and have some sherry."
"You're a terrible flirt," said Shannon.
"Nonsense, I've never flirted in my life. I have always been dreadfully misunderstood," Anabel said, with that laugh that had half-seduced every man who heard it. The red of her shiny hair was fading and she had grown thinner but, as she led them through the salon out to the terrace overlooking the sea, it was uncanny to see with what gentle strokes time seemed to have touched La Maree and its owner. Daisy's heart leaped as she thought how this place, this haven, at least, could never be taken away from Anabel."

"As they walked back, up the steep hill of the Cote de Grace, Shannon was thoughtful. He'd never talked as much about his early years. He sensed that he'd left out something, missed some essential connections. But all he could find to explain himself to Daisy was his favorite quotation from his durable sage.
"Listen--this is the way I feel about life--George Bernard Shaw said it. 'People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can't find them, they make them." He had stopped walking as he spoke.
"Is that your motto too?" she asked.
"Yes. What do you think of it?"
"It's almost probably half true... which isn't at all bad for a motto," she said. "You might try to give me a kiss... there's no one to see us."
He kissed her for a long moment and Daisy felt that she was growing around him as a climbing rose grows around a sturdy arbor.
"Am I a 'circumstance'?" she murmured.
"You are a silly question." He pulled her braids. "I'll race you back."

This is just one part of the book that gets to me--that she is the center of attention but we learn so much about the many other characters who surround her, who interact with her, who take interest in her. It feels at times we don't know her at all, and then sometimes it feels we know her too well, that we ARE her, in a sense. The book is powerful in that way, and cements Judith Krantz as a good storyteller, despite my not knowing many of her other works. This one, I know for a fact at least, is special.

And here's the straight information you may be looking for:

-Full title: Princess Daisy
-Author: Judith Krantz
-Format: Hardcover, First Edition (stated), full color dust jacket with portrait of woman on front, black and white portrait photograph of author full on back, inside endpapers yellow flower design, green boards and white spine/binding
-Condition: Roughness on inside front dust jacket you can see in the pictures, but otherwise this book is in near mint condition! Red mark on top, seems to be from a marker but just a line over the pages, no idea what it means or where it came from, but not prominent. I didn't notice it at first and only saw it now going over the book to write this!
-Publisher: Crown Publishers, Inc. New York
-Copyright: Steve Krantz Productions, 1980
-Date published: 1980
-Provenance: I got this from a library donation cart, actually, where they had a cute little sign saying "please donate 10 cents per book" so of course I gave them a little bit more money for the books I picked out, I couldn't give a library ten cents for a book, but still it was after-hours outside the Friends of the Library Store at this city library which was detached from the main library, and usually the store is run during the time the library is open but they do have different hours. This isn't a place I normally am in (more middle Connecticut) so I took advantage of visiting the library because I'm a geek like that, and I'd been looking for jobs at the time though it was far away, so scoping all this out I went to the Friends bookstore sad to find it closed, then this cart was there! I should say it was bigger than just a cart, it was like a full stack on both sides of books like you'd find at your normal library and it took a bit for me to get through, and there were a TON of books from the 80s and 90s, which I'm not so well versed in as to their worth, so I spent a lot of time there by myself, the night growing darker and darker and my not noticing (probably not a good idea for a girl alone in an unfamiliar city, but the place was covered by an overhang and absolutely no one walked in or was near it since it was in the parking lot of the library facing out from the back, but still). When I saw this cover I was stunned by the beauty captured by the artist of the main character, Princess Daisy, and any stories about princesses will catch my attention, but this one especially caught it when I read the inside synopsis on the jacket. I picked it up along with a few others, dropped my change into the donation box like a little jewelry box posted at the top of the stacks, and went home. Only later did I realize, reading it, what a great story it was, and how much I wanted to share it with someone. So here's to sharing it with you! So that's where it came from but as to the previous owner there is an impression marked into the pages the way people used to do, stamped in, you know? It is a circle that says "DRA" and the outside of the circle says "Library of Diane R. Arnold." So, of course, I had to look up who this was, but I was left fruitless. There are a few Diane R Arnolds living in Connecticut, all older (listed as 65+) and I cannot figure out which one it is, as they are all within driving distance of the city the library is in. So, all we know is it was donated to the library by a Diane R Arnold from middle Connecticut in December 2016 or earlier, as that was when I picked this book up for the first time. :)
-Pricing: I priced this book based on its condition, mainly, because it is in much better shape than the other ones selling out there. It is not too expensive as it is from the 80s so there are other copies elsewhere for less, but this one is certainly in great condition and you should buy it from me rather than take a chance on the others, ones that state they are first editions but show no pictures, or ones that are from listings that are otherwise not as thorough or seem trustworthy as this one. The book started at a price generally around the same that it is selling at elsewhere in all other respects, but it is worth more than many of the other listings would have you think. So, be careful is all I can say if you don't buy this gorgeous book here!

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FAQs

Absolutely! I'm willing to do anything to get this book to you, but I will not write on it. If it is not in the condition you want, I know preservation techniques and will certainly oblige as best I can. You just need to let me know.
I will wrap the book any way you want. It is special and so are you, you deserve it! I will also write cards, include photographs, anything you'd like that would make this transaction more, well, you.
I won't tell you how to care for your book, but as to how they are cared for now, they are housed in two places -- some are wrapped in plastic in my main room in the part of the house that used to be a quaint B&B, lined on lovely old wooden bookshelves; others are stacked in piles or leaning on cool, creative and different bookends all round the room, and all are given care, attention, and kept away from my dog :)

Others sit in my library, in built-in authentic 1800s wooden and glass-door library shelves that line the walls in a secluded room in a historic home on the shore. With vintage, warm lamplights over the tiny marble fireplace, the library's windows catch plenty of sunlight--the books are in good homes and will arrive undamaged.
If the book comes later than expected this does not mean it was sent late. Every book is sent within 1-3 business days, unless one of the days is a Sunday, then it could be an extra day. This applies to International orders as well, but they might take longer to get to you than in-country orders. If there is a problem, please bring it up with UPS or see Etsy's policies.
I am more than willing to hunt down a specific book for you. This can take time, however, and would be a matter of personal back-and-forth on the site so you would have to keep in contact. There is no guarantee. I'm good at finding things however, and if I cannot find it to sell to you myself I will direct you to where I can find it online, if I can.

Important to note, however, that I may have it in my holdings already so it ALWAYS helps to check in with me. Listings come up continually, and it may just be waiting here to get processed and put up.
Contact me directly via the site and I will do my absolute best to help correct it. There should be no problems.
Always willing to make new friends and take on new jobs or opportunities -- this business does not stop me from working a full or part time job, and I am currently looking, so please contact me! Dempseylynch@gmail.com. I am definitely interested in talking with you and love meeting new people (especially book lovers of course).
Sure! Although the books are priced the way they are and are worth that amount based on a lot of factors (condition compared to others available online, if there are any available online or if it is the only one, age and whether it is signed or special in some way, etc.) I am always willing to hear you out as to why you think the books price is off, and work with you as best I can. I cannot guarantee the price will change, that is bad for my business, but I will listen to you. Don't be afraid to reach out. The worst that can happen is I will say no.

I put the reasons behind my pricing method for each item at the end of the listing so check that out if you're curious too :)

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