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Beautiful Jean Varon Floral poppies 1970's maxi dress S

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Beautiful Jean Varon Floral poppies 1970's maxi dress S

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$338.39

Only 1 available


Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1970s
  • Size: 8 UK women's
  • Material: polyester
  • Favorited by: 24 people
  • Gift message available
This shop accepts Etsy gift cards

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 1–2 business days
From United Kingdom

Description

I seem to be slightly obsessed with Jean Varon at the moment, I cant get enough. The elegance, the fun, the fabrics, colours and shapes, so glamorous, so quirky.

This beautiful floral dress is a style typical to Varon, lots of layers of fabric gently floating over the main dress, and with tassles to the back.

It has a high neck, with the main body fabric coming up to the chest and the remaining being transparent. It is empire line and falls to the floor in a full skirt , whilst having an transparent attached 'cape' that hangs over the bust but longer at the back with a white tassle on the end of each point. In my opinion this can be worn in various ways.
The fabric is white with black lilies, flowers, leaves and circles as well as gorgeous large red poppies.

Fully lined, and fastens with a zip and a button at the back of the neck.

Jean Varon is soaring in terms of value and collectability at the moment so get in quick with a British design classic that will only increase in value.

PLEASE NOTE - This week I'll be listing twins and triplet items! Item that I have more than one of, in either the same or colour variants. I have the same dress listed in black so these might make perfect wedding/bridesmaid outfits.

era - 1970's
fabric - polyester
condition - excellent
size - 8

length - 53"
armpit to armpit - 31"/40cm
bust - 28"/72cm
neck to bust - 9"/24cm
waist - 27"/35cm


label - Jean Varon
Condition- excellent other than the ribbon hanging a little lose when the dress is hung and not worn.

John Bates started the Jean Varon label in 1960 and is possibly one of the greatest forgotten talents of the 1960s and 1970s. With no formal training, he took an apprenticeship at London couturier Herbert Sidon in the late 1950s. “I called it Jean Varon because at the time an English name like John Bates meant nothing; you had to appear to be French. Jean is French for John and Varon because there was no ‘V’ in the rag trade book. Jean Varon made a good graphic image’”(John Bates quoted in ‘Boutique’ by Marnie Fogg). As far as is known, all Jean Varon labeled garments were designed by Bates. Early garments are innovative with space-age fabrics, see-through panels, cut-out holes and matching accessories right down to the tights. As an aside, Bates is also sometimes credited with the ‘invention’ of the mini-skirt. He popularized trousers for women and encouraged the first ‘underwear as outerwear’ style, through precision cutting and the use of lace and mesh. An example of this work won him the ‘Dress of The Year’ title in 1965.

His reputation earned him the ultimate commission — designing a wardrobe of outfits for the second half of the first Emma Peel season on The Avengers in 1965-66. The contrast from Bates’ first appearance as designer is breathtaking; his bold op-art motifs, mini-skirts, trousers and feminine evening-wear injected glamour and youth into the character. Contrary to popular belief, Bates was only on board for half a season and took no further part in The Avengers. It is a connection that he continues to be most famous for. His designs were also manufactured for sale across the country, the first time that a woman could watch a TV character one evening and own the clothes by the next.

In the later 1960s and 1970s Bates continued to innovate but the garments moved towards a softer, feminine look. Bates concurrently designed for an own-name label, which was more avant garde and innovative. He was still designing for Varon throughout the 1970s, but at some point in the late 1970s/early 1980s his own label fizzled out into bankruptcy and he decided to leave the mainstream fashion business. He is now working as an artist and living in Wales. The Varon label carried on into the 1980s, with designer Tom Bowker. There are still a few gems to be found from this era, but it is the Bates work that is collectible.

See also: John Bates
I seem to be slightly obsessed with Jean Varon at the moment, I cant get enough. The elegance, the fun, the fabrics, colours and shapes, so glamorous, so quirky.

This beautiful floral dress is a style typical to Varon, lots of layers of fabric gently floating over the main dress, and with tassles to the back.

It has a high neck, with the main body fabric coming up to the chest and the remaining being transparent. It is empire line and falls to the floor in a full skirt , whilst having an transparent attached 'cape' that hangs over the bust but longer at the back with a white tassle on the end of each point. In my opinion this can be worn in various ways.
The fabric is white with black lilies, flowers, leaves and circles as well as gorgeous large red poppies.

Fully lined, and fastens with a zip and a button at the back of the neck.

Jean Varon is soaring in terms of value and collectability at the moment so get in quick with a British design classic that will only increase in value.

PLEASE NOTE - This week I'll be listing twins and triplet items! Item that I have more than one of, in either the same or colour variants. I have the same dress listed in black so these might make perfect wedding/bridesmaid outfits.

era - 1970's
fabric - polyester
condition - excellent
size - 8

length - 53"
armpit to armpit - 31"/40cm
bust - 28"/72cm
neck to bust - 9"/24cm
waist - 27"/35cm


label - Jean Varon
Condition- excellent other than the ribbon hanging a little lose when the dress is hung and not worn.

John Bates started the Jean Varon label in 1960 and is possibly one of the greatest forgotten talents of the 1960s and 1970s. With no formal training, he took an apprenticeship at London couturier Herbert Sidon in the late 1950s. “I called it Jean Varon because at the time an English name like John Bates meant nothing; you had to appear to be French. Jean is French for John and Varon because there was no ‘V’ in the rag trade book. Jean Varon made a good graphic image’”(John Bates quoted in ‘Boutique’ by Marnie Fogg). As far as is known, all Jean Varon labeled garments were designed by Bates. Early garments are innovative with space-age fabrics, see-through panels, cut-out holes and matching accessories right down to the tights. As an aside, Bates is also sometimes credited with the ‘invention’ of the mini-skirt. He popularized trousers for women and encouraged the first ‘underwear as outerwear’ style, through precision cutting and the use of lace and mesh. An example of this work won him the ‘Dress of The Year’ title in 1965.

His reputation earned him the ultimate commission — designing a wardrobe of outfits for the second half of the first Emma Peel season on The Avengers in 1965-66. The contrast from Bates’ first appearance as designer is breathtaking; his bold op-art motifs, mini-skirts, trousers and feminine evening-wear injected glamour and youth into the character. Contrary to popular belief, Bates was only on board for half a season and took no further part in The Avengers. It is a connection that he continues to be most famous for. His designs were also manufactured for sale across the country, the first time that a woman could watch a TV character one evening and own the clothes by the next.

In the later 1960s and 1970s Bates continued to innovate but the garments moved towards a softer, feminine look. Bates concurrently designed for an own-name label, which was more avant garde and innovative. He was still designing for Varon throughout the 1970s, but at some point in the late 1970s/early 1980s his own label fizzled out into bankruptcy and he decided to leave the mainstream fashion business. He is now working as an artist and living in Wales. The Varon label carried on into the 1980s, with designer Tom Bowker. There are still a few gems to be found from this era, but it is the Bates work that is collectible.

See also: John Bates

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(26)

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Returns & exchanges

Refunds will be given if it is proven that I have falsely or inaccurately sold you an item. I cannot refund if the size doesn't fit, as vintage items are one -offs and often vary greatly in size. I will give you as much information as i can before sending it off, but it is your responsibility to make sure you have acknowledged the measurements given and checked it against yourself.

Shipping policies

i will post within 1-2 days of sale.

Additional policies

Items i sell labelled "vintage" are classed as so, due to being over 20 years old. So they may not be 100% free of minor defects as they have, of course been worn. I include any noticeable flaws in item descriptions and photographs for buyer discretion.
Of course the reason I sell vintage is that the quality of items from previous eras tends to far surpass most of the modern and one can presume the quality is very high. unless i deem an item 'style-led' which may mean the quality is a little comprised but the style and statement the item may give is still of value.

Do contact me if you have any questions or comments. I gladly provide additional photos, measurements, and/or any additional information or even historical information on the era or label of the item that's being offered.

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