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Vintage Pisgah Forest Pottery, Walter B. Stephen (1875-1961), North Carolina Artist, Pisgah Forest, 1934, Vintage Pottery Rose Bowl

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Vintage Pisgah Forest Pottery, Walter B. Stephen (1875-1961), North Carolina Artist, Pisgah Forest, 1934, Vintage Pottery Rose Bowl

What a wonderful vintage, Pisgah Pottery, hand thrown bowl, made by W. B. Stephen in Asheville, NC in 1934.

The exterior is a beautiful glazed bone/cream color, while the interior is a lovely pink rose.

This vase or rose bowl is signed with a raised potter at wheel and is marked 'Pisgah Forest, W. B. Stephen, 1934'.

There are some subtle imperfections in the glaze, as it is a hand thrown piece. The exterior has one small hairline crack in the neck area, just below the rim, the glaze does not seem to be cracked. There are no nicks or chips. There is fine crazing throughout the surface. Overall, this is a wonderful bowl with a great feel and beautiful patina.

The opening is 3 3/4" in diameter.
The bottom is 4" in diameter.
It is about 6 1/2" in diameter at it's widest.
It is about 4 5/8" in height.

Please don't hesitate to message me if you have any questions.

Thank you for looking!

I will be glad to combine shipping if you are purchasing more than one item. Please contact me prior to completing the purchases and I will make the necessary adjustments.

I will refund any difference in shipping cost, back to your original form of payment, for more than an overage of one dollar.

History of Pisgah Forest Pottery

"Inspired by the Arts & Crafts Movement, Stephen and his mother began their first pottery, Nonconnah, near Memphis, Tennessee about 1904. Without prior experience, they produced slip-decorated pottery of exceptional merit. Stephen created the shapes to which his mother applied multicolored floral decorations on matte green backgrounds.

Stephen moved to Skyland, North Carolina in 1913 where he established a second Nonconnah Pottery, the first full-time art pottery in the state. In 1926, Stephen began operation of his third pottery, Pisgah Forest. Here he explored Oriental glazes and forms, pioneered the first crystalline glazes in the South, and developed his cameo wares which resemble English Wedgewood jasperwares. However, unlike the English wares, Stephen’s work was not molded but created from hand painted multiple layers of porcelain. Reflective of his early experiences in the west, Stephen’s porcelain cameo scenes included covered wagons, Indian hunts, cabins, fiddlers and other scenes of American folk life.

Stephen’s story reflects the determination of an American pioneer who not only created unique American art pottery, but also made his buildings, homes, tools, glazes and equipment. He was an early member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and lifelong supporter of handicrafts in the western North Carolina mountains.

Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah pottery have gained national recognition from numerous museums and private collectors. Major exhibitions of Stephen’s work have been held at the Mint Museum in Charlotte and the Asheville Art Museum in North Carolina, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee, and the McKissick Museum in Columbia, SC. Recent auctions set record prices with a Pisgah Forest cameo example bringing over $9000. and a Nonconnah vase going for $8700.

Owned and operated by Thomas Case, Stephen’s step-grandson, this pottery site was the best preserved historic pottery in North Carolina. Virtually unchanged from the 1920s, the workshop contained the 1917 clay filter press, the 1929 wood kiln, and early containers of glaze ingredients from the 1920s.

Following Cases death in 2014, the pottery was permanently closed and the historic contents were donated to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh." (per http://www.pisgahforestpottery.com/history)
Vintage Pisgah Forest Pottery, Walter B. Stephen (1875-1961), North Carolina Artist, Pisgah Forest, 1934, Vintage Pottery Rose Bowl

What a wonderful vintage, Pisgah Pottery, hand thrown bowl, made by W. B. Stephen in Asheville, NC in 1934.

The exterior is a beautiful glazed bone/cream color, while the interior is a lovely pink rose.

This vase or rose bowl is signed with a raised potter at wheel and is marked 'Pisgah Forest, W. B. Stephen, 1934'.

There are some subtle imperfections in the glaze, as it is a hand thrown piece. The exterior has one small hairline crack in the neck area, just below the rim, the glaze does not seem to be cracked. There are no nicks or chips. There is fine crazing throughout the surface. Overall, this is a wonderful bowl with a great feel and beautiful patina.

The opening is 3 3/4" in diameter.
The bottom is 4" in diameter.
It is about 6 1/2" in diameter at it's widest.
It is about 4 5/8" in height.

Please don't hesitate to message me if you have any questions.

Thank you for looking!

I will be glad to combine shipping if you are purchasing more than one item. Please contact me prior to completing the purchases and I will make the necessary adjustments.

I will refund any difference in shipping cost, back to your original form of payment, for more than an overage of one dollar.

History of Pisgah Forest Pottery

"Inspired by the Arts & Crafts Movement, Stephen and his mother began their first pottery, Nonconnah, near Memphis, Tennessee about 1904. Without prior experience, they produced slip-decorated pottery of exceptional merit. Stephen created the shapes to which his mother applied multicolored floral decorations on matte green backgrounds.

Stephen moved to Skyland, North Carolina in 1913 where he established a second Nonconnah Pottery, the first full-time art pottery in the state. In 1926, Stephen began operation of his third pottery, Pisgah Forest. Here he explored Oriental glazes and forms, pioneered the first crystalline glazes in the South, and developed his cameo wares which resemble English Wedgewood jasperwares. However, unlike the English wares, Stephen’s work was not molded but created from hand painted multiple layers of porcelain. Reflective of his early experiences in the west, Stephen’s porcelain cameo scenes included covered wagons, Indian hunts, cabins, fiddlers and other scenes of American folk life.

Stephen’s story reflects the determination of an American pioneer who not only created unique American art pottery, but also made his buildings, homes, tools, glazes and equipment. He was an early member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and lifelong supporter of handicrafts in the western North Carolina mountains.

Pisgah Forest and Nonconnah pottery have gained national recognition from numerous museums and private collectors. Major exhibitions of Stephen’s work have been held at the Mint Museum in Charlotte and the Asheville Art Museum in North Carolina, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee, and the McKissick Museum in Columbia, SC. Recent auctions set record prices with a Pisgah Forest cameo example bringing over $9000. and a Nonconnah vase going for $8700.

Owned and operated by Thomas Case, Stephen’s step-grandson, this pottery site was the best preserved historic pottery in North Carolina. Virtually unchanged from the 1920s, the workshop contained the 1917 clay filter press, the 1929 wood kiln, and early containers of glaze ingredients from the 1920s.

Following Cases death in 2014, the pottery was permanently closed and the historic contents were donated to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh." (per http://www.pisgahforestpottery.com/history)

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(69)
Reviewed by Zachary Holzapfel
5 out of 5 stars
Feb 25, 2018
First Rate! Thank you!
Vintage Herpa Model Junkers Ju 52/3 D-AQUI

Reviewed by Randi-Lynn Korn
5 out of 5 stars
Jan 26, 2018
The piece is lovely and exactly as described. Great and kind seller. The box works perfectly as a makeup case!
Antique Distressed Metal Box with Small Interior Compartments and Removable Tray

Reviewed by Julie

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Vintage Pisgah Forest Pottery, Walter B. Stephen (1875-1961), North Carolina Artist, Pisgah Forest, 1934, Vintage Pottery Rose Bowl

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1930s
  • Feedback: 69 reviews
  • Favorited by: 1 person
  • Gift message available

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