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Gents Cuff Bangle with Display Hallmarks. John Fox

Gents Cuff Bangle with Display Hallmarks. John Fox

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$133.16

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Bracelet width: 6.4 mm
  • Material: Silver
  • Can be personalized: Yes
  • Recycled: No
  • Style: Brutalist
  • Adjustable: No
  • Favorited by: 6 people
  • Gift message available
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Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 1–2 business days
From United Kingdom
Returns and exchanges accepted
Exceptions may apply. See return policy

Description

I'm sure Thor would have worn this if I'd got there a bit earlier. I could have done with his hammering skills! A very manly bangle designed to sit quite tightly on the wrist. The markings on the outside are the hallmarks, struck by the Edinburgh Assay Office. Th It arrives in a presentation box, of course. The shop price would be at least £220.
Ref F86DHM


The British hallmarking system goes back centuries and the history is well recorded on the internet so I’ll not repeat it here.
Unlike most other countries all manufacturers have to submit work to one of the four Assay Offices to test the metal quality, not the standard of work offered. The Assay Office then stamp a set of marks accordingly, see below. Silver weighing under 7 grams and gold under 1 gram need not be submitted. Most other countries allow manufacturers to stamp the goods themselves and are subject to spot check by a government official.
Starting on the left hand side :
1) JRF in a shield with three arches. I am registered at the Edinburgh Assay Office of Goldsmith’s Hall and am therefore the only person registered there with those initials at that office. Useful if anyone wants to trace the maker of a piece. It’s known as the maker’s or the sponsor’s mark.
2) Next along is 925 in an oval shield. This is the quality of the silver, 92.5% silver aka, sterling silver. Most countries use this, although India usually works with 800.
3) The lion rampant is next. This tells you that the metal is silver, the 925 tell you the quality. There is also 950 which is called Britannia Silver ( beware, not Britannia Metal which is a base metal) . 950 is more often used for raising bowls and jugs etc as it’s more malleable.
4) The splendid Edinburgh castle. This is the office that has marked the goods and where I am registered.
5) The last of the hallmarks is the date letter, in this case “U” for 2019. The shape of the letter and the shape of the shield are important as, in conjunction with the office the year the goods were marked can be established. It changes every year, of course, so a variety of shields and fonts are used. A couple of letters are omitted as they look too much alike so the alphabet repeats every 24 years ( I think its 24 )
6) The final one in the row isn’t part of the official hallmark layout. It’s my own branding mark or advertising. The Assay office are co-operative and kindly strike the mark for me.
The strip of silver in the photos with the large marks are called display hallmarks. Obviously they are decorative which is the purpose of them.
The smaller marks shown are more commonly used. In this case the small marks would be on the inside of the bangle. The smallest marks available are half a millimetre for use on the inside of rings and other small things.
Hope that throws some light on ancient art of hallmarking.
John R Fox
I'm sure Thor would have worn this if I'd got there a bit earlier. I could have done with his hammering skills! A very manly bangle designed to sit quite tightly on the wrist. The markings on the outside are the hallmarks, struck by the Edinburgh Assay Office. Th It arrives in a presentation box, of course. The shop price would be at least £220.
Ref F86DHM


The British hallmarking system goes back centuries and the history is well recorded on the internet so I’ll not repeat it here.
Unlike most other countries all manufacturers have to submit work to one of the four Assay Offices to test the metal quality, not the standard of work offered. The Assay Office then stamp a set of marks accordingly, see below. Silver weighing under 7 grams and gold under 1 gram need not be submitted. Most other countries allow manufacturers to stamp the goods themselves and are subject to spot check by a government official.
Starting on the left hand side :
1) JRF in a shield with three arches. I am registered at the Edinburgh Assay Office of Goldsmith’s Hall and am therefore the only person registered there with those initials at that office. Useful if anyone wants to trace the maker of a piece. It’s known as the maker’s or the sponsor’s mark.
2) Next along is 925 in an oval shield. This is the quality of the silver, 92.5% silver aka, sterling silver. Most countries use this, although India usually works with 800.
3) The lion rampant is next. This tells you that the metal is silver, the 925 tell you the quality. There is also 950 which is called Britannia Silver ( beware, not Britannia Metal which is a base metal) . 950 is more often used for raising bowls and jugs etc as it’s more malleable.
4) The splendid Edinburgh castle. This is the office that has marked the goods and where I am registered.
5) The last of the hallmarks is the date letter, in this case “U” for 2019. The shape of the letter and the shape of the shield are important as, in conjunction with the office the year the goods were marked can be established. It changes every year, of course, so a variety of shields and fonts are used. A couple of letters are omitted as they look too much alike so the alphabet repeats every 24 years ( I think its 24 )
6) The final one in the row isn’t part of the official hallmark layout. It’s my own branding mark or advertising. The Assay office are co-operative and kindly strike the mark for me.
The strip of silver in the photos with the large marks are called display hallmarks. Obviously they are decorative which is the purpose of them.
The smaller marks shown are more commonly used. In this case the small marks would be on the inside of the bangle. The smallest marks available are half a millimetre for use on the inside of rings and other small things.
Hope that throws some light on ancient art of hallmarking.
John R Fox

Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars (20)

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