Whoa! You can't buy your own item.

Bill Gibb 70's kaftan batwing 'Bees' dress with sequins and beads. O/S

Request a custom order and have something made just for you.

This seller usually responds within 24 hours.

Bill Gibb 70's kaftan batwing 'Bees' dress with sequins and beads. O/S

Ask a question

$1,956.55

Only 1 available


Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1970s
  • Size: One size UK women's
  • Material: jersey
  • Favorited by: 44 people
  • Gift message available
This shop accepts Etsy gift cards

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 1–2 business days
From United Kingdom

Description

Such an exciting piece, i’m so proud to own a piece from this incredible and exciting Scottish designer.

This dress is so unusual, it’s a soft light jersey fabric with so much attention to detail I don’t know where to start.

The yolk is made of cream crêpe embroidered with flowers and Gibbs‘s signature bumblebee and embossed with beautiful sparkly crystals and sequins and glass beads.
The cuff are wide and made of the same fabric with four crystal buttons with loops and a large frill that hangs over.

It is sleeveless, with a fixed cape that hangs down the back which fastens with cuffs creating a large dramatic batwing style which hangs in gentle folds when the arms are lowered.

The hem and edges are edged in delicate self coloured lace.

This dress could easily fit any size with only the cuffs that fit tight.

It could make an incredibly impacting and unusual wedding dress

Era- 1970
Label- Bill Gibbs
Condition- consistent with age. One button missing on one cuff. A couple of small snags on the front of the dress (photographs can be sent on request) loose thread at top of cuff.
no beads missing and no marks

Size
Cuffs -8”
Length 58”
Cape length 43.5”
Arms 27”
Bust 40”
Yoke 11.5”


“...... By 1970, Gibb was being more influenced by the hippie movement which suited his love of mixing prints and experimenting with patterned knitwear. His growing popularity led to the creation of The Bill Gibb Room at Harrods in London. Twiggy even wore one of his dresses to the premiere of The Boyfriend in 1971 and the publicity this garnered had a huge impact on his blossoming career. At around the same time, he was invited by the Federation of Embroidery at Voralberg in Austria to design a collection which would represent its 21 members. Here he met Kate Franklin, who became his business partner and encouraged him to launch Bill Gibb Ltd. in 1972.

He launched with a collection in a totally new theme, using animals and nature to inspire and trim his work. Throughout his career, the clothes show a dramatic variety. He was fond of plain leathers, suedes and wool crepes, sometimes left plain but often decorated with lavish embroidery and unusual trimmings (the quirky ‘bee’ motif being his most famous). The extraordinary mixed prints in cotton contrasted with exquisite evening wear in slinky, colourful draped jerseys and shimmering, fairytale ballgowns. The shapes are voluminous and romantic, inspired by history and fantasy.

He became perhaps most famous for his extraordinary knitwear designs, undeniably inspired by his Scottish origins.The knitwear was one of his most successful ventures, creating countless fans of the beautifully subtle palette and extraordinary mixes of colours.

Gibb was certainly a true artist and the extraordinary creations were amongst the nearest a British designer got to haute couture. He designed with a lot of theatricality and often had to reject large numbers of designs because they were simply not saleable, which made the design process very long and drawn out for him. He was also still first and foremost a designer in ink, who relied on an army of pattern cutters and makers to transfer the designs from the page and into reality. Like so many designers of the British Boutique Movement, he often struggled with the realities of business and several times found his business on the verge of collapse. The 1980s saw him surviving by designing small capsule collections for manufacturers and creating one-off garments for faithful clients. He showed at London Fashion Week in a collaboration with Fassett in 1985, to renewed critical acclaim and it looked like his career might be on the up again. However, Gibb died of bowel cancer in 1988 before he had the opportunity to really re-establish himself in the British fashion world.
Thanks to vintage fashion guild label resources
Such an exciting piece, i’m so proud to own a piece from this incredible and exciting Scottish designer.

This dress is so unusual, it’s a soft light jersey fabric with so much attention to detail I don’t know where to start.

The yolk is made of cream crêpe embroidered with flowers and Gibbs‘s signature bumblebee and embossed with beautiful sparkly crystals and sequins and glass beads.
The cuff are wide and made of the same fabric with four crystal buttons with loops and a large frill that hangs over.

It is sleeveless, with a fixed cape that hangs down the back which fastens with cuffs creating a large dramatic batwing style which hangs in gentle folds when the arms are lowered.

The hem and edges are edged in delicate self coloured lace.

This dress could easily fit any size with only the cuffs that fit tight.

It could make an incredibly impacting and unusual wedding dress

Era- 1970
Label- Bill Gibbs
Condition- consistent with age. One button missing on one cuff. A couple of small snags on the front of the dress (photographs can be sent on request) loose thread at top of cuff.
no beads missing and no marks

Size
Cuffs -8”
Length 58”
Cape length 43.5”
Arms 27”
Bust 40”
Yoke 11.5”


“...... By 1970, Gibb was being more influenced by the hippie movement which suited his love of mixing prints and experimenting with patterned knitwear. His growing popularity led to the creation of The Bill Gibb Room at Harrods in London. Twiggy even wore one of his dresses to the premiere of The Boyfriend in 1971 and the publicity this garnered had a huge impact on his blossoming career. At around the same time, he was invited by the Federation of Embroidery at Voralberg in Austria to design a collection which would represent its 21 members. Here he met Kate Franklin, who became his business partner and encouraged him to launch Bill Gibb Ltd. in 1972.

He launched with a collection in a totally new theme, using animals and nature to inspire and trim his work. Throughout his career, the clothes show a dramatic variety. He was fond of plain leathers, suedes and wool crepes, sometimes left plain but often decorated with lavish embroidery and unusual trimmings (the quirky ‘bee’ motif being his most famous). The extraordinary mixed prints in cotton contrasted with exquisite evening wear in slinky, colourful draped jerseys and shimmering, fairytale ballgowns. The shapes are voluminous and romantic, inspired by history and fantasy.

He became perhaps most famous for his extraordinary knitwear designs, undeniably inspired by his Scottish origins.The knitwear was one of his most successful ventures, creating countless fans of the beautifully subtle palette and extraordinary mixes of colours.

Gibb was certainly a true artist and the extraordinary creations were amongst the nearest a British designer got to haute couture. He designed with a lot of theatricality and often had to reject large numbers of designs because they were simply not saleable, which made the design process very long and drawn out for him. He was also still first and foremost a designer in ink, who relied on an army of pattern cutters and makers to transfer the designs from the page and into reality. Like so many designers of the British Boutique Movement, he often struggled with the realities of business and several times found his business on the verge of collapse. The 1980s saw him surviving by designing small capsule collections for manufacturers and creating one-off garments for faithful clients. He showed at London Fashion Week in a collaboration with Fassett in 1985, to renewed critical acclaim and it looked like his career might be on the up again. However, Gibb died of bowel cancer in 1988 before he had the opportunity to really re-establish himself in the British fashion world.
Thanks to vintage fashion guild label resources

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(26)

Payments

Secure options
  • Visa
  • Mastercard
  • American Express
  • Discover
  • Paypal
  • GiftcardAccepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Etsy keeps your payment information secure. Etsy shops never receive your credit card information.

Returns & exchanges

Refunds will be given if it is proven that I have falsely or inaccurately sold you an item. I cannot refund if the size doesn't fit, as vintage items are one -offs and often vary greatly in size. I will give you as much information as i can before sending it off, but it is your responsibility to make sure you have acknowledged the measurements given and checked it against yourself.

Shipping policies

i will post within 1-2 days of sale.

Additional policies

Items i sell labelled "vintage" are classed as so, due to being over 20 years old. So they may not be 100% free of minor defects as they have, of course been worn. I include any noticeable flaws in item descriptions and photographs for buyer discretion.
Of course the reason I sell vintage is that the quality of items from previous eras tends to far surpass most of the modern and one can presume the quality is very high. unless i deem an item 'style-led' which may mean the quality is a little comprised but the style and statement the item may give is still of value.

Do contact me if you have any questions or comments. I gladly provide additional photos, measurements, and/or any additional information or even historical information on the era or label of the item that's being offered.

What’s wrong with this listing?

The first thing you should do is contact the seller directly.

If you’ve already done that, your item hasn’t arrived, or it’s not as described, you can report that to Etsy by opening a case.

Report a problem with an order

We take intellectual property concerns very seriously, but many of these problems can be resolved directly by the parties involved. We suggest contacting the seller directly to respectfully share your concerns.

If you’d like to file an allegation of infringement, you’ll need to follow the process described in our Copyright and Intellectual Property Policy.

Review how we define handmade, vintage and supplies

See a list of prohibited items and materials

Read our mature content policy

The item for sale is…