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Georges Rouault Miserere- Plate 1

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Georges Rouault is a distinctive figure in twentieth-century art. Born in working-class Paris in 1871, Rouault was apprenticed as a youth to a stained glass workshop. In late 1890, he enrolled in the École des Beaux-Arts, where he became the favorite pupil of Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau. Rouault became involved with the Fauves (among them his classmate Henri Matisse) and began participating in major exhibitions, notably the Salon d'Automne of 1905. Rouault developed his own, primarily Expressionist, style, influenced by his strong affinity for the medieval period. Yet he remained outside of the group movements that dominated the twentieth century, developing a focused, persistent artistic vision expressed in a variety of media. In addition to paintings, drawings, and prints, he also executed ceramics and designs for tapestry and stained glass, as well as the set for Diaghilev's ballet 1929 ballet The Prodigal Son. Rouault came to be highly regarded in France and internationally, and was the first artist to be given a state funeral by the French government upon his death in 1958.

The MIserere prints were originally commissioned by Rouault's powerful Parisian art dealer, Ambroise Vollard. The project was conceived as two volumes, titled Miserere and Guerre, to be made up of 100 large etchings accompanied by text by poet André Suarès. Rouault developed the majority of the images between 1914 and 1918-the years of World War I. His initial ink and gouache sketches were transferred to copper plates. Under Vollard's strenuous demands, Rouault reworked the plates continuously between 1922 and 1927. Ultimately, the books never materialized, but 58 images were printed in an edition of 450 in 1927. Vollard later had the plates canceled so that no further prints could be made. However, due to Vollard's untimely death in 1939 and Rouault's legal struggles with Vollard's heirs, the etchings were not published until 1948. Given the title Miserere, they were recognized as a milestone in expanding the technical and expressive range of the print.

Perhaps more than anything, Rouault's devout Roman Catholic faith was the guiding if unstated principle of his art, leading to his persistent concern with the twin themes of humanity's frailty and redemption. Rouault himself said, "All of my work is religious for those who know how to look at it," and Miserere et Guerre is in many senses a comprehensive expression of Rouault's religious vision. In the series Rouault addresses many of the themes that prevail throughout his work: brutality; degradation; hatred; injustice and judicial corruption; loneliness; poverty and hunger; the destructiveness of war; and-counterbalancing it all-compassion.

Miserere et Guerre is the largest set engraved by Georges Rouault, and it includes 58 large aquatints done between 1916 and 1927 and published in 1948. The edition consist of 425 copies plus another 25 not in circulation. Other than being the most abundant as regards the number of plates engraved, the Miserere is also probably the most significant and sensitive series in the artist's graphic work.

In addition to being considered by many to be Rouault's single greatest work, the Miserere has come to be regarded as one of the most significant 20th-Century works dealing with the crises of the early twentieth century: the introduction of weapons of mass destruction during the first world war (machine guns, poison gas, strafing and bombing), political instability (the Russian Revolution, the dissolution of the German monarchy and the Austrian Empire, the rise of the right wing in Germany), social turmoil (the rise of fascism in Italy, communism in Russia and the fear of the "spectre" of Bolshevism spreading across Europe and America after the end of World War I), and spiritual upheaval ( the challenge of evolutionary theory and psychoanalysis to traditional Christianity in Europe and America).

This is Plate 1: Miserere (C & R 54e). Original aquatint, drypoint, burnisher, and roulette, 1923. 450 impressions signed in the plate (there are no pencil-signed proofs) for Rouault's masterpiece of the same title, one of the greatest print cycles of all time. Rouault choose this print of Christ as the suffering servant to introduce the series, begun during the years after the horrors of the first world war; his full title comes from the opening of Psalm 51 "Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving-kindness."

This etching is framed and image size is 575 mm x 423 mm. I believe the piece was framed in the early 1980's by Brentano's Galleries on Fifth Avenue in New York City, as their original label remains on the rear of the piece. Brentano's went out of business at this location in the mid 1980's. This etching appears undamaged and in excellent condition for it's age. I have included shipping costs to anywhere in the continental United States in the quoted price. I can also personally deliver this item within 75 miles of Westchester County, New York

If you love this item, make an offer, I am willing to negotiate.
Georges Rouault is a distinctive figure in twentieth-century art. Born in working-class Paris in 1871, Rouault was apprenticed as a youth to a stained glass workshop. In late 1890, he enrolled in the École des Beaux-Arts, where he became the favorite pupil of Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau. Rouault became involved with the Fauves (among them his classmate Henri Matisse) and began participating in major exhibitions, notably the Salon d'Automne of 1905. Rouault developed his own, primarily Expressionist, style, influenced by his strong affinity for the medieval period. Yet he remained outside of the group movements that dominated the twentieth century, developing a focused, persistent artistic vision expressed in a variety of media. In addition to paintings, drawings, and prints, he also executed ceramics and designs for tapestry and stained glass, as well as the set for Diaghilev's ballet 1929 ballet The Prodigal Son. Rouault came to be highly regarded in France and internationally, and was the first artist to be given a state funeral by the French government upon his death in 1958.

The MIserere prints were originally commissioned by Rouault's powerful Parisian art dealer, Ambroise Vollard. The project was conceived as two volumes, titled Miserere and Guerre, to be made up of 100 large etchings accompanied by text by poet André Suarès. Rouault developed the majority of the images between 1914 and 1918-the years of World War I. His initial ink and gouache sketches were transferred to copper plates. Under Vollard's strenuous demands, Rouault reworked the plates continuously between 1922 and 1927. Ultimately, the books never materialized, but 58 images were printed in an edition of 450 in 1927. Vollard later had the plates canceled so that no further prints could be made. However, due to Vollard's untimely death in 1939 and Rouault's legal struggles with Vollard's heirs, the etchings were not published until 1948. Given the title Miserere, they were recognized as a milestone in expanding the technical and expressive range of the print.

Perhaps more than anything, Rouault's devout Roman Catholic faith was the guiding if unstated principle of his art, leading to his persistent concern with the twin themes of humanity's frailty and redemption. Rouault himself said, "All of my work is religious for those who know how to look at it," and Miserere et Guerre is in many senses a comprehensive expression of Rouault's religious vision. In the series Rouault addresses many of the themes that prevail throughout his work: brutality; degradation; hatred; injustice and judicial corruption; loneliness; poverty and hunger; the destructiveness of war; and-counterbalancing it all-compassion.

Miserere et Guerre is the largest set engraved by Georges Rouault, and it includes 58 large aquatints done between 1916 and 1927 and published in 1948. The edition consist of 425 copies plus another 25 not in circulation. Other than being the most abundant as regards the number of plates engraved, the Miserere is also probably the most significant and sensitive series in the artist's graphic work.

In addition to being considered by many to be Rouault's single greatest work, the Miserere has come to be regarded as one of the most significant 20th-Century works dealing with the crises of the early twentieth century: the introduction of weapons of mass destruction during the first world war (machine guns, poison gas, strafing and bombing), political instability (the Russian Revolution, the dissolution of the German monarchy and the Austrian Empire, the rise of the right wing in Germany), social turmoil (the rise of fascism in Italy, communism in Russia and the fear of the "spectre" of Bolshevism spreading across Europe and America after the end of World War I), and spiritual upheaval ( the challenge of evolutionary theory and psychoanalysis to traditional Christianity in Europe and America).

This is Plate 1: Miserere (C & R 54e). Original aquatint, drypoint, burnisher, and roulette, 1923. 450 impressions signed in the plate (there are no pencil-signed proofs) for Rouault's masterpiece of the same title, one of the greatest print cycles of all time. Rouault choose this print of Christ as the suffering servant to introduce the series, begun during the years after the horrors of the first world war; his full title comes from the opening of Psalm 51 "Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving-kindness."

This etching is framed and image size is 575 mm x 423 mm. I believe the piece was framed in the early 1980's by Brentano's Galleries on Fifth Avenue in New York City, as their original label remains on the rear of the piece. Brentano's went out of business at this location in the mid 1980's. This etching appears undamaged and in excellent condition for it's age. I have included shipping costs to anywhere in the continental United States in the quoted price. I can also personally deliver this item within 75 miles of Westchester County, New York

If you love this item, make an offer, I am willing to negotiate.

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Georges Rouault Miserere- Plate 1

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Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1940s
  • Height: 32 Inches
  • Width: 26 Inches
  • Feedback: 12 reviews
  • Favorited by: 2 people
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