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Bearded axe war hammer with red cedar shaft dragon carving wood stain and leather wrap

Bearded axe war hammer with red cedar shaft dragon carving wood stain and leather wrap

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$175.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: wood stain, vintage steel, ax head, metal file, flap disc sanding wheel, clear coat, sandpaper, leather strap, metal tacks
  • Favorited by: 6 people
  • Gift message available
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From Snow Hill, NC
Returns and exchanges accepted
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Description

A bearded axe with war hammer on the opposite face made from a vintage American steel splitting maul and red cedar handle. This one of a kind piece has been crafted with patience and attention to detail from the shaft of the axe to the head it self. Lets start withe large combination head. Picked from a pile of rusty old metal at a local thrift mall the supports homeless animals the head was taken home and cleaned with white vinegar and sandpaper to remove all the built up oxidation. Then the plans were laid out and cut all as delicately as one can with a cutting disc. Then the cuts were smoothed and beveled. Curves were refined and edges worn down. Files and whetstones were used to refine the edge of the blade. A final layer of neutral oil was applied to keep a lovely sheen and protect the restored metal. Let us now move on to the handle, the center of a young red cedar that was selected and harvested by my own hands. All parts of the tree were used with two sections being turned into axe handles. The one on this piece is the smaller of the two but holds just as much beauty as the rest of the tree. Shaved of the bark and then roughly shaped with a short machete and using long hours of practice the handle began to take shape. A rough sanding of fifty and eighty grit sand paper removed the last bit of under bark and got the last bit of fuzziness cedar can have off of the shaft and made it ready for detailing. Thus began the process of carving the spiral and rings for the handgrip but removing small slivers of wood until the canal formed wrapping around. These grooves were then sanded and smoothed. Next was the pommel with a rough carving of the dragon with wood knots worked into the design. One of those knots became an eye the other a nostril. The opposite eye became a pit to show that there was no eye there. In the mouth the teeth are a step below and the inside of the mouth beyond the teeth adds yet another level of depth. This was all cut by hand and smoothed with my dremel tool. After a final smoothing over off all parts a stain pen was used to add color to certain aspects of the dragon's head as well as the hand grip. The time had come to join the two parts, metal and wood, the processed and organic materials. The top of the shaft was cut and the axe head fitted on like a personally tailored glove. A wooden wedge and glue were firmly motivated into the top of the axe shaft expanding it to grip the eyelet of the axe head even more firmly. Secured together but now for reinforcement of the shaft so that it might withstand and trial put before it. From my pile of odds and ends emerged a piece of mild steel with three holes evenly placed on opposite ends. This piece was cut in two and sharp edges made dull before I coerced the right angle of the pieces into a more obtuse situation with hammer and anvil. Placed on opposite sides of the shaft under the head they were then held in place with epoxy and cut nails. At last I had arrived to the final step of fabrication of this piece, the wrapping. One can not simply start twisting and weaving leather cord around and hope for the best. You must think, and over think, and go back and realize you are over complicating things. Then use yarn to lay it out and see how much material you need because leather cord, even though thin, is not cheap. Then after it has all been laid out and measured you begin. Around the base of the head and crisscrossing twice. Down in and around in sets of five lines with cut iron tacks holding it in place. Around the metal it goes and covers the base of the two iron supports till just above the grip the leather wrap ends being tucked and tacked in upon it's self. This is how this piece was made and I hope you realize how much thought and care has gone into this. I hope it hangs on your wall for many years and inspires awe and admiration among friends and family. May it be passed down through generations as in centuries past. Most of all I hope you never find a need for it, but that it hangs there ready but never needed.
A bearded axe with war hammer on the opposite face made from a vintage American steel splitting maul and red cedar handle. This one of a kind piece has been crafted with patience and attention to detail from the shaft of the axe to the head it self. Lets start withe large combination head. Picked from a pile of rusty old metal at a local thrift mall the supports homeless animals the head was taken home and cleaned with white vinegar and sandpaper to remove all the built up oxidation. Then the plans were laid out and cut all as delicately as one can with a cutting disc. Then the cuts were smoothed and beveled. Curves were refined and edges worn down. Files and whetstones were used to refine the edge of the blade. A final layer of neutral oil was applied to keep a lovely sheen and protect the restored metal. Let us now move on to the handle, the center of a young red cedar that was selected and harvested by my own hands. All parts of the tree were used with two sections being turned into axe handles. The one on this piece is the smaller of the two but holds just as much beauty as the rest of the tree. Shaved of the bark and then roughly shaped with a short machete and using long hours of practice the handle began to take shape. A rough sanding of fifty and eighty grit sand paper removed the last bit of under bark and got the last bit of fuzziness cedar can have off of the shaft and made it ready for detailing. Thus began the process of carving the spiral and rings for the handgrip but removing small slivers of wood until the canal formed wrapping around. These grooves were then sanded and smoothed. Next was the pommel with a rough carving of the dragon with wood knots worked into the design. One of those knots became an eye the other a nostril. The opposite eye became a pit to show that there was no eye there. In the mouth the teeth are a step below and the inside of the mouth beyond the teeth adds yet another level of depth. This was all cut by hand and smoothed with my dremel tool. After a final smoothing over off all parts a stain pen was used to add color to certain aspects of the dragon's head as well as the hand grip. The time had come to join the two parts, metal and wood, the processed and organic materials. The top of the shaft was cut and the axe head fitted on like a personally tailored glove. A wooden wedge and glue were firmly motivated into the top of the axe shaft expanding it to grip the eyelet of the axe head even more firmly. Secured together but now for reinforcement of the shaft so that it might withstand and trial put before it. From my pile of odds and ends emerged a piece of mild steel with three holes evenly placed on opposite ends. This piece was cut in two and sharp edges made dull before I coerced the right angle of the pieces into a more obtuse situation with hammer and anvil. Placed on opposite sides of the shaft under the head they were then held in place with epoxy and cut nails. At last I had arrived to the final step of fabrication of this piece, the wrapping. One can not simply start twisting and weaving leather cord around and hope for the best. You must think, and over think, and go back and realize you are over complicating things. Then use yarn to lay it out and see how much material you need because leather cord, even though thin, is not cheap. Then after it has all been laid out and measured you begin. Around the base of the head and crisscrossing twice. Down in and around in sets of five lines with cut iron tacks holding it in place. Around the metal it goes and covers the base of the two iron supports till just above the grip the leather wrap ends being tucked and tacked in upon it's self. This is how this piece was made and I hope you realize how much thought and care has gone into this. I hope it hangs on your wall for many years and inspires awe and admiration among friends and family. May it be passed down through generations as in centuries past. Most of all I hope you never find a need for it, but that it hangs there ready but never needed.

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(9)

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I gladly accept returns and exchanges

Contact me within: 14 days of delivery
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