Hard to Find Antique 1914 Buffalo Pottery Argyle China Teapot, With Metal Tea Strainer Attached to Lid

Hard to Find Antique 1914 Buffalo Pottery Argyle China Teapot, With Metal Tea Strainer Attached to Lid

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$250.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

Materials

Buffalo Pottery, China Teapot, Buffalo Pottery Teapot, Buffalo Pottery Argyle, Argyle Teapot, Teapot With Strainer, Transfer Print Design Teapot, 1914 Teapot, Antique Teapot, Vintage Teapot, Blue and White Teapot, New York Pottery, Larkin Soap Company

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Vintage from the 1910s

Shipping & returns

Get it fast! Ready to ship in 1–3 business days.
From Delaware, OH
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

Description

This is an antique china teapot, made in 1914 by the Buffalo Pottery Company, as a part of its Argyle line. The teapot has a white background and is decorated with (what is likely) transfer printed blue flowers. Its lid has a metal tea strainer attached to it. A chain for the strainer goes through a hole in the lid’s finial and has a wooden knob on its end. The knob sits directly on the top of the finial and the chain is not visible, when the strainer is submerged into the pot/water. When the knob is pulled/lifted, the strainer is lifted up and the chain is visible on the outside of the lid. The chain can be locked into place, on the outside of the lid, to keep the strainer out of the water/tea that is in the pot. (See image no. 6.) This teapot is marked (on its underside), with the image of a buffalo and the words/date “China, Buffalo Pottery, Argyle, and 1914”. The metal strainer has marks (on its underside), indicating that it was patented in Great Britain, in February and November of 1909 and April of 1910.

Buffalo Pottery Company was established in 1901, by the founders of the Larken Soap Company, which was established in 1875. Both companies were located in Buffalo, New York. To spur the sale of soap, the founders of the Larkin Soap Company initially commissioned a ceramic soap dish that could be purchased with a certificate that was given (as a premium) to buyers of the soap. Because the soap-merchandising scheme was so successful, the Larkin founders started the pottery company (which was wholly owned by Larkin), to manufacture their own premium merchandise. The first Buffalo Pottery Company products were semi-vitreous china dinnerware sets. Its other early products included game, fowl, and fish sets, advertising plates and mugs, a line of Blue Willow ware, a line that featured multi-colored décor (called Gaudy Yellow), and commemorative and historical lines. By 1911, Buffalo Pottery employed about 250 people and its high quality products were being sold throughout the United States and exported to 27 countries. The premium products on which it was founded continued to be very popular with consumers. During World War I, Buffalo Pottery turned to the manufacture of hotel china. After the war, the company’s production of semi-vitreous ware made a brief come-back, but was quickly abandoned. By the 1920s, Buffalo Pottery had completely shifted its production to commercial grade china. The Larkin Soap Company, which had diversified to include a range of household products, closed in the 1940s. It existed as a mail order company until 1962. Today, the trademark for Buffalo Pottery (now called Buffalo China) is owned by the Oneida Group of Lancaster, Ohio. The Buffalo collection is Oneida's casual line of dinnerware.

The teapot is about 5 inches tall (without the lid) and 7 1/4 inches tall (with the lid). It is about 6 inches wide (not including the spout and handle) and 9 1/4 inches wide (including the spout and handle). It has a diameter (at the top rim) of about 4 7/8 inches.

This teapot is in very good condition, with no chips or cracks. On the rim of the teapot, there is a very tiny spot with an extra bit of glazing. When you run your finger over it, it is very clear that this is not a chip or a crack and is a manufacturing flaw. It is the size of a pin-head and is much too small to be visible in a photogragh. It is very hard to find these teapots ‘with the strainer and in this good condition’.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is an antique china teapot, made in 1914 by the Buffalo Pottery Company, as a part of its Argyle line. The teapot has a white background and is decorated with (what is likely) transfer printed blue flowers. Its lid has a metal tea strainer attached to it. A chain for the strainer goes through a hole in the lid’s finial and has a wooden knob on its end. The knob sits directly on the top of the finial and the chain is not visible, when the strainer is submerged into the pot/water. When the knob is pulled/lifted, the strainer is lifted up and the chain is visible on the outside of the lid. The chain can be locked into place, on the outside of the lid, to keep the strainer out of the water/tea that is in the pot. (See image no. 6.) This teapot is marked (on its underside), with the image of a buffalo and the words/date “China, Buffalo Pottery, Argyle, and 1914”. The metal strainer has marks (on its underside), indicating that it was patented in Great Britain, in February and November of 1909 and April of 1910.

Buffalo Pottery Company was established in 1901, by the founders of the Larken Soap Company, which was established in 1875. Both companies were located in Buffalo, New York. To spur the sale of soap, the founders of the Larkin Soap Company initially commissioned a ceramic soap dish that could be purchased with a certificate that was given (as a premium) to buyers of the soap. Because the soap-merchandising scheme was so successful, the Larkin founders started the pottery company (which was wholly owned by Larkin), to manufacture their own premium merchandise. The first Buffalo Pottery Company products were semi-vitreous china dinnerware sets. Its other early products included game, fowl, and fish sets, advertising plates and mugs, a line of Blue Willow ware, a line that featured multi-colored décor (called Gaudy Yellow), and commemorative and historical lines. By 1911, Buffalo Pottery employed about 250 people and its high quality products were being sold throughout the United States and exported to 27 countries. The premium products on which it was founded continued to be very popular with consumers. During World War I, Buffalo Pottery turned to the manufacture of hotel china. After the war, the company’s production of semi-vitreous ware made a brief come-back, but was quickly abandoned. By the 1920s, Buffalo Pottery had completely shifted its production to commercial grade china. The Larkin Soap Company, which had diversified to include a range of household products, closed in the 1940s. It existed as a mail order company until 1962. Today, the trademark for Buffalo Pottery (now called Buffalo China) is owned by the Oneida Group of Lancaster, Ohio. The Buffalo collection is Oneida's casual line of dinnerware.

The teapot is about 5 inches tall (without the lid) and 7 1/4 inches tall (with the lid). It is about 6 inches wide (not including the spout and handle) and 9 1/4 inches wide (including the spout and handle). It has a diameter (at the top rim) of about 4 7/8 inches.

This teapot is in very good condition, with no chips or cracks. On the rim of the teapot, there is a very tiny spot with an extra bit of glazing. When you run your finger over it, it is very clear that this is not a chip or a crack and is a manufacturing flaw. It is the size of a pin-head and is much too small to be visible in a photogragh. It is very hard to find these teapots ‘with the strainer and in this good condition’.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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Returns & exchanges

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But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

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