Vintage Norwegian Modernist Abstract Bronze Brooch/Pendant, by Unn Tangerud for Uni David-Andersen

Have a question about the item? Send a message.

This seller usually responds within a few hours.

Vintage Norwegian Modernist Abstract Bronze Brooch/Pendant, by Unn Tangerud for ...

Message Seller

$200.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

Materials

David Andersen, Uni David Andersen, Unn Tangerud, Modernist Brooch, Norwegian Modernist Brooch, Scandinavian Modernist Brooch, Abstract Brooch, Oslo Norway, Bronze Brooch, Bronze Pendant, Norwegian Bronze, 1960s Brooch, 1960s Pendant

More

Vintage from the 1960s

Shipping & returns

Get it fast! Ready to ship in 1–3 business days.
From Delaware, OH
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

Description

This is a large bronze brooch that was made in the 1960s. It has a Modernist abstract and sculptural design. It consists of pieces of metal ‘in a variety of shapes’ that are arranged ‘in a variety of patterns’. The overall shape is similar to shapes of Jugendstil/Art Nouveau jewelry that was produced in the 1890 to 1910 time period. There is a beautiful black patina on the bronze, which is mostly concentrated in the center of this brooch. On its back, this item has a C clasp and a bale, so that it can also be worn as a pendant. It was designed by Unn Tangerud, for Uni David-Andersen of Oslo, Norway. It has a mark on one of its sides that says “UNI D-A”, which is for “Uni David-Andersen”. There is also a mark on the opposite side that says “BRONSE INV. U.T.”, which is for “Bronze, Inventor Unn Tangerud”.

In 1876, goldsmith and silversmith David Andersen founded the David Andersen company, in Christiania (now Oslo), Norway. It was initially a maker of gold and silver jewelry and other objects. By the early part of the 20th Century, it was very successful and well-known for its enameled jewelry. David’s descendants adopted his full name as their hyphenated surname. The hyphenated surname also became the new name of the company. Uni David-Andersen was David’s great granddaughter. In the 1940s, she was educated at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, in London. She also had internships with the silversmith and instructor Adda Hustedt-Andersen in New York (in 1950-51) and at David-Andersen in Oslo (1951-52). In 1953, she worked with the silversmith Georg Jensen, in New York. In 1954-55, she studied at the National College of Art and Design, in Oslo. In 1959, Uni started her own shop, within the David-Andersen company. She worked with four other women designers, including Unn Tangerud, creating innovative Scandinavian modern designs. They experimented with new techniques and free sculptural styles, making jewelry pieces that were unique and (some) that were models for larger scale production at David-Andersen. They emphasized the artistic value of the pieces that they made, rather than on the economic value of the materials used. Their materials were silver, bronze, or copper and semiprescious stones or enamel. Uni’s workshop (but not the David-Andersen company) closed, at the end of 2001.

This brooch/pendant is 2 5/8 inches (wide) by 1 7/8 inches (high).

This item is in very good condition, with no bends in the metal, no repairs, and a good working pin.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is a large bronze brooch that was made in the 1960s. It has a Modernist abstract and sculptural design. It consists of pieces of metal ‘in a variety of shapes’ that are arranged ‘in a variety of patterns’. The overall shape is similar to shapes of Jugendstil/Art Nouveau jewelry that was produced in the 1890 to 1910 time period. There is a beautiful black patina on the bronze, which is mostly concentrated in the center of this brooch. On its back, this item has a C clasp and a bale, so that it can also be worn as a pendant. It was designed by Unn Tangerud, for Uni David-Andersen of Oslo, Norway. It has a mark on one of its sides that says “UNI D-A”, which is for “Uni David-Andersen”. There is also a mark on the opposite side that says “BRONSE INV. U.T.”, which is for “Bronze, Inventor Unn Tangerud”.

In 1876, goldsmith and silversmith David Andersen founded the David Andersen company, in Christiania (now Oslo), Norway. It was initially a maker of gold and silver jewelry and other objects. By the early part of the 20th Century, it was very successful and well-known for its enameled jewelry. David’s descendants adopted his full name as their hyphenated surname. The hyphenated surname also became the new name of the company. Uni David-Andersen was David’s great granddaughter. In the 1940s, she was educated at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, in London. She also had internships with the silversmith and instructor Adda Hustedt-Andersen in New York (in 1950-51) and at David-Andersen in Oslo (1951-52). In 1953, she worked with the silversmith Georg Jensen, in New York. In 1954-55, she studied at the National College of Art and Design, in Oslo. In 1959, Uni started her own shop, within the David-Andersen company. She worked with four other women designers, including Unn Tangerud, creating innovative Scandinavian modern designs. They experimented with new techniques and free sculptural styles, making jewelry pieces that were unique and (some) that were models for larger scale production at David-Andersen. They emphasized the artistic value of the pieces that they made, rather than on the economic value of the materials used. Their materials were silver, bronze, or copper and semiprescious stones or enamel. Uni’s workshop (but not the David-Andersen company) closed, at the end of 2001.

This brooch/pendant is 2 5/8 inches (wide) by 1 7/8 inches (high).

This item is in very good condition, with no bends in the metal, no repairs, and a good working pin.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars (6)

Payment options

Secure options
Paypal Visa Mastercard American Express Discover Giftcard
Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Etsy keeps your payment information secure. Etsy shops never receive your credit card information.

Returns & exchanges

I don't accept returns, exchanges, or cancellations

But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

You may also like