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CUSTOM Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag...

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Description

CUSTOM Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag... They call him Neopkwai'i by the Pueblo Peoples of New Mexico. Kokopelli, distinguished by his hunch-back, dancing pose, and flute, is the only anthropomorphic petroglyph to have a name, an identity, and an established gender.
His name may have been derived from the Zuni name for god ("Koko") and the Indian name for the Desert Robber Fly ("pelli"). His association with the Desert Robber Fly may stem from the fact that this insect too, has a hump on his back and a prominent proboscis.
But, Kokopelli is known by other names, as well," Ololowishkya" to the Zuni. To the Hopi, he is known as "Kokopilau" - meaning "wood hump". To others, he is known as Kokopele and Kokopetiyot. Kokopelli's lesser-known female counterpart is known as "Kokopelli Mana".
Known to some as a magician, to others he was a storyteller, teacher, healer, trickster, trader, or god of the harvest. Almost universally, however, he was regarded as a harbinger of fertility, assuring success in hunting, growing crops, and human conception. The Anasazi, who was first to claim Kokopelli, were primarily farmers who grew corn, beans, and squash on the Colorado Plateau. They regarded Kokopelli as a fertility symbol and he was always welcomed during corn planting season. According to Navajo legend, Kokopelli was the God of Harvest and Plenty - a benign minor god who brought abundant rain and food to people. The Zuni also regarded him as a Rain Priest, able to make it rain at will.
In Pueblo myths, he carried seeds, babies, and blankets to offer the maidens he seduced on his back. To the Navajo, his hump was made of clouds filled with seeds and rainbows. In the Hopi village of Oraibi, they believe he carried deerskin shirts and moccasins which he used to barter for brides or babies which he left with the young women. A San Ildefonso legend says Kokopelli was a wandering minstrel who carried songs on his back, trading new songs for old ones. Others believe that Kokopelli's sack contained the seeds of all the plants and flowers of the world, which he scattered every Spring. According to this legend, Kokopelli brought good luck and prosperity to anyone who listened to his songs.

Listen to Neopkwai'i spread his song and blessings across the southwest and so will you wearing the Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag...

This bag is 3 1/2 by 5 inches embellished with black glass and picture jasper stone beads on a braided leather lanyard...
CUSTOM Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag... They call him Neopkwai'i by the Pueblo Peoples of New Mexico. Kokopelli, distinguished by his hunch-back, dancing pose, and flute, is the only anthropomorphic petroglyph to have a name, an identity, and an established gender.
His name may have been derived from the Zuni name for god ("Koko") and the Indian name for the Desert Robber Fly ("pelli"). His association with the Desert Robber Fly may stem from the fact that this insect too, has a hump on his back and a prominent proboscis.
But, Kokopelli is known by other names, as well," Ololowishkya" to the Zuni. To the Hopi, he is known as "Kokopilau" - meaning "wood hump". To others, he is known as Kokopele and Kokopetiyot. Kokopelli's lesser-known female counterpart is known as "Kokopelli Mana".
Known to some as a magician, to others he was a storyteller, teacher, healer, trickster, trader, or god of the harvest. Almost universally, however, he was regarded as a harbinger of fertility, assuring success in hunting, growing crops, and human conception. The Anasazi, who was first to claim Kokopelli, were primarily farmers who grew corn, beans, and squash on the Colorado Plateau. They regarded Kokopelli as a fertility symbol and he was always welcomed during corn planting season. According to Navajo legend, Kokopelli was the God of Harvest and Plenty - a benign minor god who brought abundant rain and food to people. The Zuni also regarded him as a Rain Priest, able to make it rain at will.
In Pueblo myths, he carried seeds, babies, and blankets to offer the maidens he seduced on his back. To the Navajo, his hump was made of clouds filled with seeds and rainbows. In the Hopi village of Oraibi, they believe he carried deerskin shirts and moccasins which he used to barter for brides or babies which he left with the young women. A San Ildefonso legend says Kokopelli was a wandering minstrel who carried songs on his back, trading new songs for old ones. Others believe that Kokopelli's sack contained the seeds of all the plants and flowers of the world, which he scattered every Spring. According to this legend, Kokopelli brought good luck and prosperity to anyone who listened to his songs.

Listen to Neopkwai'i spread his song and blessings across the southwest and so will you wearing the Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag...

This bag is 3 1/2 by 5 inches embellished with black glass and picture jasper stone beads on a braided leather lanyard...

Reviews

5 out of 5 stars
(139)

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Returns & exchanges

I gladly accept returns
Contact me within: 3 days of delivery
Ship items back within: 14 days of delivery
I don't accept exchanges or cancellations
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.
The following items can't be returned or exchanged
Because of the nature of these items, unless they arrive damaged or defective, I can't accept returns for:
  • Custom or personalized orders
  • Items on sale
Conditions of return
Buyers are responsible for return shipping costs. If the item is not returned in its original condition, the buyer is responsible for any loss in value.

FAQs

The section called Gallery CUSTOM from Sold is to help customers wanting a custom-made bag to find similar bag ideas. Select one of these and I will make a CUSTOM bag for you similar to it or of the same subject matter. The bag color is of my choice but I will try to accommodate a special request. These bags cannot be duplicated, obviously, being one-of-a-kind creations. Once a custom-made order is placed there are no exchanges, new selection or return.
Earthwayspirits medicine bags are hand crafted and hand painted, one of a kind. The craftmeanship of the leather pouch is substantial. The beading is secured with polyester threat to prevent breaking. The painting, however, will not withstand misuse of any kind; stretching, scraping or exposing it to any liquids. I use a fabric paint sealant to make the paint and ink more adherant. Under normal wear and tear, earthwayspirits medicine bags should last years. Store in a dry, dark and cool place...
Allow me 8 days to create your medicine bag and then add shipping time. Please inquire through Etsy messaging if you would like to request a specific color leather or beading be used, only if available.

CUSTOM Neopkwai'i Medicine Bag...

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$50.00

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Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: leather, sinew, black glass beads, picture jasper stone beads, pony beads, ink, paint, braided leather lanyard
  • Made to order
  • Feedback: 139 reviews
  • Favorited by: 4 people
  • Gift message available
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Shipping & returns

Get it fast! Ready to ship in 1–3 business days.
From Hagerman, NM
Returns accepted
Exceptions may apply. See return policy

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