Mid Century Noritake Florence Pattern (No. 5528) Two-Handled Covered Serving Bowl, Made Between 1953 and 1960

Mid Century Noritake Florence Pattern (No. 5528) Two-Handled Covered Serving Bowl, Made Between 1953 and 1960

Message Seller

$40.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

Materials

Noritake, Noritake Florence, Noritake 5528, Serving Bowl, Japanese Porcelain, Two Handled Serving Bowl, Mid Century Bowl, Mid Century Porcelain, 1950s Porcelain, 1950s Japanese Bowl, Covered Serving Bowl, Vintage Porcelain, Japanese Serving Bowl

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Vintage from the 1950s

Shipping & returns

Get it fast! Ready to ship in 1–3 business days.
From Delaware, OH
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

Description

This is a two-handled round Japanese covered serving bowl, in the Noritake company’s Florence pattern. It has green and brown leaves and gold flowers, painted on a white background. There are also a gold painted trims, on the handles and around the rims of the bowl and the lid. The Florence pattern was introduced in 1953 and was discontinued in 1960. The bowl has a hallmark on its bottom that includes an N encircled by a wreath, which the company began using in 1953.

The company that eventually became known as the Noritake Company was started in the early 20th Century. In 1876, Baron Ichazaemon IV of Japan founded a company called Morimura Brothers, with a retail and wholesale office in New York that was used for the export to the United States of Japanese products. Although the baron initially provided for his needs by running a china decorating facility in Japan, beginning around 1884, Morimura Brothers bought and distributed porcelain blanks that were decorated by independent subcontractors in Japan and exported to the United States. In 1904, the baron formed a company, in the village of Noritake, Japan (which was the forerunner to the present Noritake Company) that manufactured porcelain products. The new company was called Nippon Toki Kaisha, Ltd., which means “the company that makes Japan’s finest china”. Around 1911, the first china products from this Japanese manufacturer were exported to the United States, via Morimura Brothers. At that time, Morimura Brothers began using an “M encircled by a wreath” mark on the exports. The mark on early Morimura Brothers pieces also included the word “Nippon”, because the McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 required that all porcelain entering the United States be marked with the country of origin and Japanese exporters put the mark “Nippon” on its products, which was the Japanese Kanji characters for the word “Japan”. After a 1921 U.S. law dictated that imports into the United States had to be marked in legible English words that indicated the country of origin, the use of the term “Nippon” was changed to “Japan”. In 1953, the company began using an “N encircled by a wreath” mark. Although consumers and collectors have called the tableware produced by the company "Noritake" and/or "Nippon" since the late 1920s, the Japanese parent company did not officially change its name to the Noritake Company, Ltd. until 1981.

This bowl has a diameter of about 8 3/4 inches and is about 3 inches high, without its lid. It is about 4 1/2 inches high, with the lid on.

This item is in good condition, with no chips, cracks, or crazing. There is some loss of paint on the gold trim (see images nos. 4, 5, and 6), as is to be expected on something of this age.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is a two-handled round Japanese covered serving bowl, in the Noritake company’s Florence pattern. It has green and brown leaves and gold flowers, painted on a white background. There are also a gold painted trims, on the handles and around the rims of the bowl and the lid. The Florence pattern was introduced in 1953 and was discontinued in 1960. The bowl has a hallmark on its bottom that includes an N encircled by a wreath, which the company began using in 1953.

The company that eventually became known as the Noritake Company was started in the early 20th Century. In 1876, Baron Ichazaemon IV of Japan founded a company called Morimura Brothers, with a retail and wholesale office in New York that was used for the export to the United States of Japanese products. Although the baron initially provided for his needs by running a china decorating facility in Japan, beginning around 1884, Morimura Brothers bought and distributed porcelain blanks that were decorated by independent subcontractors in Japan and exported to the United States. In 1904, the baron formed a company, in the village of Noritake, Japan (which was the forerunner to the present Noritake Company) that manufactured porcelain products. The new company was called Nippon Toki Kaisha, Ltd., which means “the company that makes Japan’s finest china”. Around 1911, the first china products from this Japanese manufacturer were exported to the United States, via Morimura Brothers. At that time, Morimura Brothers began using an “M encircled by a wreath” mark on the exports. The mark on early Morimura Brothers pieces also included the word “Nippon”, because the McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 required that all porcelain entering the United States be marked with the country of origin and Japanese exporters put the mark “Nippon” on its products, which was the Japanese Kanji characters for the word “Japan”. After a 1921 U.S. law dictated that imports into the United States had to be marked in legible English words that indicated the country of origin, the use of the term “Nippon” was changed to “Japan”. In 1953, the company began using an “N encircled by a wreath” mark. Although consumers and collectors have called the tableware produced by the company "Noritake" and/or "Nippon" since the late 1920s, the Japanese parent company did not officially change its name to the Noritake Company, Ltd. until 1981.

This bowl has a diameter of about 8 3/4 inches and is about 3 inches high, without its lid. It is about 4 1/2 inches high, with the lid on.

This item is in good condition, with no chips, cracks, or crazing. There is some loss of paint on the gold trim (see images nos. 4, 5, and 6), as is to be expected on something of this age.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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Returns & exchanges

I don't accept returns, exchanges, or cancellations

But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

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