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Vintage Original Signed Two-Toned Etching of Commedia Dell'Arte Theater, Black and Reddish-Brown (Pantalone) & Black and White (Pulcinella)

Vintage Original Signed Two-Toned Etching of Commedia Dell'Arte Theater, Black and Reddish-Brown (Pantalone) & Black and White (Pulcinella)

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$300.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

  • Vintage item
  • Materials: Commedia DellArte, Italian Theater, Comedy of Craftsmen, Pantalone Etching, Pantaloon Etching, Pulcinella Etching, Art on Paper, Vintage Etching, Black Ink Etching, Red Ink Etching, Signed Etching, Original Etching, Two Toned Etching

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From Delaware, OH
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Description

This is a vintage original etching of a scene from circa 17th Century ‘Commedia Dell’Arte’ theater, which was also known as the ‘Comedy of Professional Craftsmen’ theater. It shows the character Pantalone (etched with reddish-brown and black ink) and the character Pulcinella (etched with black ink), as they are standing in a courtyard. The image is on paper that has a watermark. The etching is signed (in pencil), in the lower right corner, but I cannot decipher the artist’s name.

Commedia Dell’Arte was an early form of professional theater that originated in Italy, was popular in Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries, had (usually) masked characters who improvised performances based upon sketches or scenarios, and had jokes and pantomines as its special characteristics. Many troupes were formed, to perform Commedia. The four major character-types of this form of theater were foolish old men, devious servants, young lovers, and boasting military captains. Each of the popular characters were identifiable, by his/her mask and/or clothes. Pantalone was a foolish old man. In English, his name was “Pantaloon”, which means “old fool” or “dotard”. He was a symbol of wealth and high social status, loved his money, was exceptionally greedy, was very petty (and never forgot or forgave, even the smallest thing), was very egotistical, and often meddled in the affairs of others. He was usually the father of one of the lovers and tried to keep the lovers apart. Pantalone had a dark half-mask, with accents on a bony structure, big bushy eyebrows, a long hooked nose, a mustache, and a long pointed or forked beard. His costume was almost entirely red and featured a Greek-style hat, a woolen skullcap, a tight jacket, a pair of long trousers or breeches with stockings, and a codpiece or strategically placed coin purse. He wore a robe or cape that was black and red. Pulcinella was also one of the Commedia’s foolish old men. He was portrayed as both a master and a servant, depending on the scenario. The “master” Pulcinella had a scheming nature and great intelligence. The “servant” Pulcinella was dull, loud, and coarse. His character either ‘pretended to be dumb, even though he was much aware of the situation’ or ‘acted as if he was intelligent and competent, even though he was woefully ignorant’. He was always trying to rise above his station and he was always on the side of the winner, even though he often did not decide this until ‘after the winner had won’. He was the ultimate self-preservationist, looking out for himself in every situation, but he still managed to sort out the affairs of everyone around him. He was everyone’s savior, although his helpfulness was accidental. Pulcinella had a top-heavy chicken-like shape and a hump back. His nose resembled a bird’s beak and was the most prominent feature of his mask, which was either black or brown. The mask also had furrowed eyebrows and very deep wrinkles. Pulcinella was most often portrayed in a baggy white ensemble. It consisted of a long-sleeved loose-fitting blouse, wide-legged trousers, and a belt that was cinched below the belly (and that emphasized a pot belly). His white hat was either a skullcap or a hat with turned-up brims.

The paper that the etching is on is 9 7/8 inches (wide) by 13 7/8 inches (high). Ths actual images is 3 3/4 inches (wide) by 3 3/4 inches (high).

This print is in very good condition, with no tears or stains. The paper is bright, because I recently had it cleaned by an art conservationist. The etching has a white art board behind it and sits very loosely in a frame, with just a few pieces of tape pieces holding the etching and the board into the frame. It does not have matting. The frame has many nicks and scratches and looks like it might be from the 1960s or 1970s. I believe that the frame would clean-up very nicely.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is a vintage original etching of a scene from circa 17th Century ‘Commedia Dell’Arte’ theater, which was also known as the ‘Comedy of Professional Craftsmen’ theater. It shows the character Pantalone (etched with reddish-brown and black ink) and the character Pulcinella (etched with black ink), as they are standing in a courtyard. The image is on paper that has a watermark. The etching is signed (in pencil), in the lower right corner, but I cannot decipher the artist’s name.

Commedia Dell’Arte was an early form of professional theater that originated in Italy, was popular in Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries, had (usually) masked characters who improvised performances based upon sketches or scenarios, and had jokes and pantomines as its special characteristics. Many troupes were formed, to perform Commedia. The four major character-types of this form of theater were foolish old men, devious servants, young lovers, and boasting military captains. Each of the popular characters were identifiable, by his/her mask and/or clothes. Pantalone was a foolish old man. In English, his name was “Pantaloon”, which means “old fool” or “dotard”. He was a symbol of wealth and high social status, loved his money, was exceptionally greedy, was very petty (and never forgot or forgave, even the smallest thing), was very egotistical, and often meddled in the affairs of others. He was usually the father of one of the lovers and tried to keep the lovers apart. Pantalone had a dark half-mask, with accents on a bony structure, big bushy eyebrows, a long hooked nose, a mustache, and a long pointed or forked beard. His costume was almost entirely red and featured a Greek-style hat, a woolen skullcap, a tight jacket, a pair of long trousers or breeches with stockings, and a codpiece or strategically placed coin purse. He wore a robe or cape that was black and red. Pulcinella was also one of the Commedia’s foolish old men. He was portrayed as both a master and a servant, depending on the scenario. The “master” Pulcinella had a scheming nature and great intelligence. The “servant” Pulcinella was dull, loud, and coarse. His character either ‘pretended to be dumb, even though he was much aware of the situation’ or ‘acted as if he was intelligent and competent, even though he was woefully ignorant’. He was always trying to rise above his station and he was always on the side of the winner, even though he often did not decide this until ‘after the winner had won’. He was the ultimate self-preservationist, looking out for himself in every situation, but he still managed to sort out the affairs of everyone around him. He was everyone’s savior, although his helpfulness was accidental. Pulcinella had a top-heavy chicken-like shape and a hump back. His nose resembled a bird’s beak and was the most prominent feature of his mask, which was either black or brown. The mask also had furrowed eyebrows and very deep wrinkles. Pulcinella was most often portrayed in a baggy white ensemble. It consisted of a long-sleeved loose-fitting blouse, wide-legged trousers, and a belt that was cinched below the belly (and that emphasized a pot belly). His white hat was either a skullcap or a hat with turned-up brims.

The paper that the etching is on is 9 7/8 inches (wide) by 13 7/8 inches (high). Ths actual images is 3 3/4 inches (wide) by 3 3/4 inches (high).

This print is in very good condition, with no tears or stains. The paper is bright, because I recently had it cleaned by an art conservationist. The etching has a white art board behind it and sits very loosely in a frame, with just a few pieces of tape pieces holding the etching and the board into the frame. It does not have matting. The frame has many nicks and scratches and looks like it might be from the 1960s or 1970s. I believe that the frame would clean-up very nicely.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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