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Antique Unger and Schilde Porcelain Plate, Heavily Gold Gilded, With Three Crown Mark, & Made in Germany (For Jonroth) Between 1909 and 1916

Antique Unger and Schilde Porcelain Plate, Heavily Gold Gilded, With Three Crown Mark, & Made in Germany (For Jonroth) Between 1909 and 1916

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$45.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1910s
  • Materials: Unger and Schilde, Three Crown China, John H Roth Company, Jonroth, Thuringia Germany, German Plate, German Porcelain, Porcelain Plate, Antique Plate, Antique Porcelain, Vintage Porcelain, Two Handled Plate, Gold Gilded Plate

Shipping & returns

Get it fast! Ready to ship in 1–3 business days.
From Delaware, OH
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

Description

This in a pretty antique porcelain plate that was made by Unger and Schilde, in Roschutz, Thuringia, Germany. It has two handles and a scalloped rim. It has a white background and is decorated with a light green ‘inner’ border that has (likely transfer printed) pink roses and green vines and leaves on it. There is a thin ‘outer’ border that has gold gilded outlines of flowers. There are also gold gilded seeds in the center of the pink roses and a gold gilded medallion in the center of the plate. This plate has a (faded) mark, on its underside, which includes an image of three crowns that are encircled by the words “Three Crown China Germany”. Unger and Schilde used this mark on its china that was made, between 1909 to 1916, for John H. Roth and Company/Jonroth.

The porcelain factory that eventually became known as Unger and Schilde was founded in 1811 (in Roschutz, Thuringia, Germany) by the von Brandenstein family, on their estate, after a family member discovered that there was a large deposit of kaolin on the property and that kaolin was a key ingredient for producing high-quality porcelain. The von Brandensteins had no technical expertise to produce porcelain and their products were restricted to very basic items. They experienced many operating difficulties and were soon forced to sell the factory. The factory was owned by a succession of owners, until 1882, when it was purchased by Karl Unger and Bernhard Schilde. Unger and Schilde were experienced businessmen and Unger had previous experience working in the ceramics industry. The Unger and Schilde Porcelain Factory employed specialists, which resulted in an increase in the quality and quantity of products. Throughout the beginning of the 20th century, the factory employed between 200 and 300 employees. In 1943, it was taken over by Ernst Schilde, who may have been Bernhard’s son. In the late 1940s, the Soviets took over a part of Germany. In 1949, the part of the country that Roschitz was in became officially known as East Germany/GDR. Ernst Schilde opposed the Soviets and, in 1952, fled East Germany. His factory was confiscated and nationalized by the Soviets, in 1953. Beginning in the 1950s, the factory that had been known as Unger and Schilde was called V.E.B. Porzellanwerk Roschutz (indicating that it was a “people-owned enterprise”). This was also the beginning of the period that the factory’s structure and machinery/equipment was not well taken care of. In 1968, the Roschutz factory became part of the nationalized Kahla Porcelain Factory. During the years that it was a part of the Kahla group, it was further neglected and was used only to produce cheap products. After the reunification of East Germany and West Germany (in 1990), the Roschutz factory was closed, because the premises, machinery, and equipment was too old/outdated to be of futher use in the production of porcelain. The historic factory building still stands in Roschutz, today, and is used as office space for a building rental company.

John H. Roth started working in the ceramics industry in 1884, as a clerk for the C. E. Wheelock Pottery Company of South Bend, Indiana. Wheelock, which had been founded around 1877, imported art pottery and fine china from (at least) Europe and Japan and was one of the largest wholesalers and retailers in the United States. While he was a Wheelock employee, Roth acquired stock in the company. In 1909, he sold that stock and used the proceeds to start his own importing business. In the early part of the 20th Century, his John H. Roth and Company had contracts with makers of high-quality porcelain and decorated and imported (for sale in the Unted States) products made by manufacturers in England, Japan, Germany, and parts of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Trademarks for the company, which often appeared on the imported products, included “John H. Roth & Co.”, JHR & Co., “Jonroth”, and “Jonroth Studios”. Porcelain that was made by the Unger and Schilde porcelain factory (between 1909 and 1916), for John H. Roth and Company, included a “Three Crown China Germany” mark.

This plate has a diameter of 9 1/4 inches.

This item is in good vintage condition. It does not have any chips or cracks. There is wear on the gold gilding, as is to be expected on something of this age. There is a tiny 1/8 of an inch black mark (see image no. 8) on the front of the plate, near its edge. I did not attempt to clean the mark/spot, to determine if it is removeable, and the buyer will need to determine if such an attempt will be made. There are also a couple of small dark marks (see image no. 9) on the underside of the plate. The maker’s mark on the plate’s underside is very faded. I can make out (with a magnifying glass) the word “Germany”, but it is hard to read the other three words. It is, however, clear to me that this is Three Crown China. The image of the three crowns is light, but is clearly visible.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This in a pretty antique porcelain plate that was made by Unger and Schilde, in Roschutz, Thuringia, Germany. It has two handles and a scalloped rim. It has a white background and is decorated with a light green ‘inner’ border that has (likely transfer printed) pink roses and green vines and leaves on it. There is a thin ‘outer’ border that has gold gilded outlines of flowers. There are also gold gilded seeds in the center of the pink roses and a gold gilded medallion in the center of the plate. This plate has a (faded) mark, on its underside, which includes an image of three crowns that are encircled by the words “Three Crown China Germany”. Unger and Schilde used this mark on its china that was made, between 1909 to 1916, for John H. Roth and Company/Jonroth.

The porcelain factory that eventually became known as Unger and Schilde was founded in 1811 (in Roschutz, Thuringia, Germany) by the von Brandenstein family, on their estate, after a family member discovered that there was a large deposit of kaolin on the property and that kaolin was a key ingredient for producing high-quality porcelain. The von Brandensteins had no technical expertise to produce porcelain and their products were restricted to very basic items. They experienced many operating difficulties and were soon forced to sell the factory. The factory was owned by a succession of owners, until 1882, when it was purchased by Karl Unger and Bernhard Schilde. Unger and Schilde were experienced businessmen and Unger had previous experience working in the ceramics industry. The Unger and Schilde Porcelain Factory employed specialists, which resulted in an increase in the quality and quantity of products. Throughout the beginning of the 20th century, the factory employed between 200 and 300 employees. In 1943, it was taken over by Ernst Schilde, who may have been Bernhard’s son. In the late 1940s, the Soviets took over a part of Germany. In 1949, the part of the country that Roschitz was in became officially known as East Germany/GDR. Ernst Schilde opposed the Soviets and, in 1952, fled East Germany. His factory was confiscated and nationalized by the Soviets, in 1953. Beginning in the 1950s, the factory that had been known as Unger and Schilde was called V.E.B. Porzellanwerk Roschutz (indicating that it was a “people-owned enterprise”). This was also the beginning of the period that the factory’s structure and machinery/equipment was not well taken care of. In 1968, the Roschutz factory became part of the nationalized Kahla Porcelain Factory. During the years that it was a part of the Kahla group, it was further neglected and was used only to produce cheap products. After the reunification of East Germany and West Germany (in 1990), the Roschutz factory was closed, because the premises, machinery, and equipment was too old/outdated to be of futher use in the production of porcelain. The historic factory building still stands in Roschutz, today, and is used as office space for a building rental company.

John H. Roth started working in the ceramics industry in 1884, as a clerk for the C. E. Wheelock Pottery Company of South Bend, Indiana. Wheelock, which had been founded around 1877, imported art pottery and fine china from (at least) Europe and Japan and was one of the largest wholesalers and retailers in the United States. While he was a Wheelock employee, Roth acquired stock in the company. In 1909, he sold that stock and used the proceeds to start his own importing business. In the early part of the 20th Century, his John H. Roth and Company had contracts with makers of high-quality porcelain and decorated and imported (for sale in the Unted States) products made by manufacturers in England, Japan, Germany, and parts of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Trademarks for the company, which often appeared on the imported products, included “John H. Roth & Co.”, JHR & Co., “Jonroth”, and “Jonroth Studios”. Porcelain that was made by the Unger and Schilde porcelain factory (between 1909 and 1916), for John H. Roth and Company, included a “Three Crown China Germany” mark.

This plate has a diameter of 9 1/4 inches.

This item is in good vintage condition. It does not have any chips or cracks. There is wear on the gold gilding, as is to be expected on something of this age. There is a tiny 1/8 of an inch black mark (see image no. 8) on the front of the plate, near its edge. I did not attempt to clean the mark/spot, to determine if it is removeable, and the buyer will need to determine if such an attempt will be made. There are also a couple of small dark marks (see image no. 9) on the underside of the plate. The maker’s mark on the plate’s underside is very faded. I can make out (with a magnifying glass) the word “Germany”, but it is hard to read the other three words. It is, however, clear to me that this is Three Crown China. The image of the three crowns is light, but is clearly visible.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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5 out of 5 stars (4)

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Returns & exchanges

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But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

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