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1930 Florence Sampson White Paper Portrait Silhouette Cutout of Florence Lubowski (of Houston, Texas)

1930 Florence Sampson White Paper Portrait Silhouette Cutout of Florence Lubowski (of Houston, Texas)

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$75.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1930s
  • Materials: Handcut Silhouette, Portrait Silhouette, Silhouette Cutout, White Silhouette, White Paper Cutout, Florence Sampson, Sampson Silhouette, Sampson Paper Cutting, Paper Cutting, 1930 Silhouette, Vintage Silhouette, Art on Paper

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Description

This is a portrait silhouette cutout that was created in 1930, by artist Florence Sampson. It is a thick white paper cutout of the bust (head and shoulders) of a young girl whose name was Florence Lubowski. The cutout is lying on the top of a piece of black paper (which comes with the cutout) and is not mounted on the paper. On the back of the cutout, the following words are written (in pencil): "2028 Cou(sic)rtlandt", "Houston", Florence Lubowski”, and “1930”. According to census records, Florence Ruth Lubowski was born on January 27, 1915, in Lorain, Ohio. Her family moved to Houston, Texas, when she was a child. In 1930, she lived with her family at 2028 Cortlandt, in Houston. When Florence Sampson created this cutout of Florence Lubowski, the child was 14 or 15 years old. Although this silhouette is not signed by the artist, the writing on the back is in the handwriting of Florence Sampson. Sampson cut silhouettes, throughout the early part of the 20th century, in various parts of the United States. I found this cutout, with personal papers that clearly belonged to Sampson and with other Sampson silhouettes/cutouts, including some that were signed by the artist and some that identified the sitter (via handwritten notations). This cutout is in the style that was used by Sampson, which included frequent use of white paper for cutouts and cutting of very fine details (such as buttons, hair ringlets, and wisps of stray hairs) into cutouts. Sampson also did not cut slashes into the interiors of cutouts, despite the fact that slash-cutting was a very popular technique, in the early part of the 20th Century. The only cuts on this artwork are those that were made along the edges, to create the ‘spikey look’ hairstyle, the facial features, and the buttons on the clothes. Images nos. 5 and 6 show a 1929 silhouette, of someone named Adrienne Johnson, that Florence Sampson cut from black paper and signed. (Please note that the silhouette that is shown in images nos. 5 and 6 is not for sale.) The word “Florence” (in the Florence Sampson signature) in images nos. 5 and 6 looks the same, including with the very distinctive letters F and L, as the word “Florence” (in Florence Lubowski) that is written on the back of the white paper cutout that is for sale and that is shown in image no. 4. This cutout was likely kept by the artist, as a part of her personal archives. In the early 20th century, it was common for silhouette artists to make more that one copy of a single silhouette and to retain at least one of the copies.

Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from paper became popular in the mid-18th century. A skilled artist could cut a portrait in a few minutes. The art form became highly popular in the United States, from 1790 to 1840. It provided an inexpensive alternative for those who could not afford more decorative and expensive forms of portraiture, such as painting or sculpture. These paper cuttings became known as “silhouettes”, because they were considered to be cheap. They were named after France’s Minister of the Treasury, Etienne de Silhouette (1709-1767). In his country, he was the subject of hostility and his penny-pinching manner led the term “silhouette” to be applied to things perceived as cheap or austere. The term silhouette” was seldom used (however) until the early decades of the 19th century, when portrait paper cuttings were growing in popularity. Although photography was eventually introduced to the world and was an inexpensive way to obtain an image or likeness, the art of silhouette cutting continued in the 20th Century. Artists cut silhouettes during traveling one-man shows, on tourist and cruise ships, and at resorts, fairs, piers, amusement parks, department stores, nightclubs, theater and hotel lobbies, studios, homes, and charity and other special events. They were most often cut freehand style, with the artist cutting by simply looking at the sitter. They were sometimes (especially in the 18th and 19th Centuries) cut with the aid of a preliminary sketch or a mechanical device that allowed the creator to trace the shadow that was made on a sheet of paper. Today, the art of silhouette cutting continues, although there are not many silhouette artists currently working in the United States.

The unmounted silhouette cutout is 1 1/4 inches (wide) by 3 1/8 inches (high). With the background paper, the work of art is 4 1/4 inches (wide) by 5 1/8 inches (high).

This cutout is in very good condition, with no tears or stains.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is a portrait silhouette cutout that was created in 1930, by artist Florence Sampson. It is a thick white paper cutout of the bust (head and shoulders) of a young girl whose name was Florence Lubowski. The cutout is lying on the top of a piece of black paper (which comes with the cutout) and is not mounted on the paper. On the back of the cutout, the following words are written (in pencil): "2028 Cou(sic)rtlandt", "Houston", Florence Lubowski”, and “1930”. According to census records, Florence Ruth Lubowski was born on January 27, 1915, in Lorain, Ohio. Her family moved to Houston, Texas, when she was a child. In 1930, she lived with her family at 2028 Cortlandt, in Houston. When Florence Sampson created this cutout of Florence Lubowski, the child was 14 or 15 years old. Although this silhouette is not signed by the artist, the writing on the back is in the handwriting of Florence Sampson. Sampson cut silhouettes, throughout the early part of the 20th century, in various parts of the United States. I found this cutout, with personal papers that clearly belonged to Sampson and with other Sampson silhouettes/cutouts, including some that were signed by the artist and some that identified the sitter (via handwritten notations). This cutout is in the style that was used by Sampson, which included frequent use of white paper for cutouts and cutting of very fine details (such as buttons, hair ringlets, and wisps of stray hairs) into cutouts. Sampson also did not cut slashes into the interiors of cutouts, despite the fact that slash-cutting was a very popular technique, in the early part of the 20th Century. The only cuts on this artwork are those that were made along the edges, to create the ‘spikey look’ hairstyle, the facial features, and the buttons on the clothes. Images nos. 5 and 6 show a 1929 silhouette, of someone named Adrienne Johnson, that Florence Sampson cut from black paper and signed. (Please note that the silhouette that is shown in images nos. 5 and 6 is not for sale.) The word “Florence” (in the Florence Sampson signature) in images nos. 5 and 6 looks the same, including with the very distinctive letters F and L, as the word “Florence” (in Florence Lubowski) that is written on the back of the white paper cutout that is for sale and that is shown in image no. 4. This cutout was likely kept by the artist, as a part of her personal archives. In the early 20th century, it was common for silhouette artists to make more that one copy of a single silhouette and to retain at least one of the copies.

Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from paper became popular in the mid-18th century. A skilled artist could cut a portrait in a few minutes. The art form became highly popular in the United States, from 1790 to 1840. It provided an inexpensive alternative for those who could not afford more decorative and expensive forms of portraiture, such as painting or sculpture. These paper cuttings became known as “silhouettes”, because they were considered to be cheap. They were named after France’s Minister of the Treasury, Etienne de Silhouette (1709-1767). In his country, he was the subject of hostility and his penny-pinching manner led the term “silhouette” to be applied to things perceived as cheap or austere. The term silhouette” was seldom used (however) until the early decades of the 19th century, when portrait paper cuttings were growing in popularity. Although photography was eventually introduced to the world and was an inexpensive way to obtain an image or likeness, the art of silhouette cutting continued in the 20th Century. Artists cut silhouettes during traveling one-man shows, on tourist and cruise ships, and at resorts, fairs, piers, amusement parks, department stores, nightclubs, theater and hotel lobbies, studios, homes, and charity and other special events. They were most often cut freehand style, with the artist cutting by simply looking at the sitter. They were sometimes (especially in the 18th and 19th Centuries) cut with the aid of a preliminary sketch or a mechanical device that allowed the creator to trace the shadow that was made on a sheet of paper. Today, the art of silhouette cutting continues, although there are not many silhouette artists currently working in the United States.

The unmounted silhouette cutout is 1 1/4 inches (wide) by 3 1/8 inches (high). With the background paper, the work of art is 4 1/4 inches (wide) by 5 1/8 inches (high).

This cutout is in very good condition, with no tears or stains.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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