Six Antique Buttons, Including Brass & Cut Steel, All Cut Steel, and Steel Cups

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Six Antique Buttons, Including Brass & Cut Steel, All Cut Steel, and Steel Cups

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$135.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Overview

Materials

Cut Steel Button, Steel Cut Button, Brass and Steel Button, Steel Cup Button, Faceted Steel Beads Button, Pierced Edge Button, Brass Disc Button, Brass Flower Button, Antique Button, Vintage Button, Pre WWI Button, 19th Century Button, Brass Button

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Vintage from the 19th century

Craft type: Crochet, Doll making, Knitting, Sewing, Upholstery

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 1–2 weeks
From Delaware, OH
No returns or exchanges
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

Description

Here are six antique buttons that were made before 1919 (and were likely made in the 19th century). The first two are a matching pair of large brass buttons, with cut steel embellishments. Each button is a brass disc, with a pattern engraved/stamped on the disc, a few cut steel beads applied to the engraved/stamped brass, brass flowers molded onto the center of the disc, and a border of cut steel beads. Each cut steel bead on the border has a stem, which was attached to the border via insertion through a hole on the border and which is visible on the back of the button. On the border of each button, there is one hole that does not have a cut steel bead inserted through it. It appears that this hole was intentionally left empty, so that a decorative element (such as another type of bead or a chain and hook) could be added. The third button is medium size and is also brass, with cut steel embellishments. It has a slightly-cupped shape, a pierced edge, a cut steel bead in the center, and a circle of smaller cut steel beads around the center bead. Only the stem for the center cut steel bead can be seen on this button’s back. The stems for the other beads are covered (on the back) with a brass disc. The fourth button is small and has a simple domed shape, pieces of cut steel that form the entire button, a border of cut steel beads, and an ‘open’ back. The stems of the cut steel beads are visible on the ‘open’ back. The fifth and sixth buttons are what are known as steel cups. They are small and have slightly cup-like shapes. Their backs and slightly-raised sides are made of steel and their borders are stamped steel. They are decorated with cut steel beads and with tiny pieces of brass and steel, of various shapes, inside of the cups. The stems for their cut steel beads are hidden inside of the steel backs. All six buttons have loop shanks and their cut steel beads are faceted.

Cut steel buttons were not easy to produce and were made with tiny individual pieces of faceted steel, which were riveted to a larger steel or brass base. They were most popular in the late 18th century, when men wore fancy buttons on their coats and French sumptuary laws dictated that only royalty could wear jeweled buttons. Non-royal noblemen and merchants (consequently) had their buttons made out of cut steel, in an effort to mimic the radiance of diamond buttons that were worn at court. Jeweler and brassware manufacturer Matthew Bolton (of Birmingham, England) perfected the method for creating cut steel buttons that had great brilliance. After 1800, large and fancy buttons on men’s coats fell out of fashion and cut steel buttons were not produced for about 50 years. Production resumed in the 1870s, when women began wearing large and decorative stamped brass and white metal buttons on their ornate gowns. Many of the same types of buttons that had been made for men in the 18th Century (especially cut steel and enamel) were created for these 19th Century gowns. Ornate brass bases that were made for some of these buttons were stamped with huge presses that were run by steam power, which was a product of the industrial revolution that brought beautiful buttons to the masses. A large number of cut steel buttons (for women) were made between 1870 and 1918. They were popular in Europe and the United States. By 1918, methods of producing cut steel buttons had changed, the quality of these buttons had deteriorated, and demand for these buttons had decreased. Steel buttons that were produced after 1918 were not made with individually faceted steel pieces that were hand-riveted to a base. As a result of steel’s high corrosion factor, not many cut steel buttons that were produced during the Victorian and Edwardian periods are still around (today).

The large brass buttons have a diameter of 1 1/2 inches. The medium size brass button as a diameter of 1 inch. The small all-steel button has a diameter of 5/8 of an inch. The two steel cups have diameters of 1/2 of an inch.

All six buttons are in good antique condition. The rim of the medium size brass button with the pierced edge has a very slight uneven shape. For all three brass buttons, the brass has patina and the cut steel has darkened with age. The cut steel on the other three buttons still has some ‘shine’. All six buttons need cleaning.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
Here are six antique buttons that were made before 1919 (and were likely made in the 19th century). The first two are a matching pair of large brass buttons, with cut steel embellishments. Each button is a brass disc, with a pattern engraved/stamped on the disc, a few cut steel beads applied to the engraved/stamped brass, brass flowers molded onto the center of the disc, and a border of cut steel beads. Each cut steel bead on the border has a stem, which was attached to the border via insertion through a hole on the border and which is visible on the back of the button. On the border of each button, there is one hole that does not have a cut steel bead inserted through it. It appears that this hole was intentionally left empty, so that a decorative element (such as another type of bead or a chain and hook) could be added. The third button is medium size and is also brass, with cut steel embellishments. It has a slightly-cupped shape, a pierced edge, a cut steel bead in the center, and a circle of smaller cut steel beads around the center bead. Only the stem for the center cut steel bead can be seen on this button’s back. The stems for the other beads are covered (on the back) with a brass disc. The fourth button is small and has a simple domed shape, pieces of cut steel that form the entire button, a border of cut steel beads, and an ‘open’ back. The stems of the cut steel beads are visible on the ‘open’ back. The fifth and sixth buttons are what are known as steel cups. They are small and have slightly cup-like shapes. Their backs and slightly-raised sides are made of steel and their borders are stamped steel. They are decorated with cut steel beads and with tiny pieces of brass and steel, of various shapes, inside of the cups. The stems for their cut steel beads are hidden inside of the steel backs. All six buttons have loop shanks and their cut steel beads are faceted.

Cut steel buttons were not easy to produce and were made with tiny individual pieces of faceted steel, which were riveted to a larger steel or brass base. They were most popular in the late 18th century, when men wore fancy buttons on their coats and French sumptuary laws dictated that only royalty could wear jeweled buttons. Non-royal noblemen and merchants (consequently) had their buttons made out of cut steel, in an effort to mimic the radiance of diamond buttons that were worn at court. Jeweler and brassware manufacturer Matthew Bolton (of Birmingham, England) perfected the method for creating cut steel buttons that had great brilliance. After 1800, large and fancy buttons on men’s coats fell out of fashion and cut steel buttons were not produced for about 50 years. Production resumed in the 1870s, when women began wearing large and decorative stamped brass and white metal buttons on their ornate gowns. Many of the same types of buttons that had been made for men in the 18th Century (especially cut steel and enamel) were created for these 19th Century gowns. Ornate brass bases that were made for some of these buttons were stamped with huge presses that were run by steam power, which was a product of the industrial revolution that brought beautiful buttons to the masses. A large number of cut steel buttons (for women) were made between 1870 and 1918. They were popular in Europe and the United States. By 1918, methods of producing cut steel buttons had changed, the quality of these buttons had deteriorated, and demand for these buttons had decreased. Steel buttons that were produced after 1918 were not made with individually faceted steel pieces that were hand-riveted to a base. As a result of steel’s high corrosion factor, not many cut steel buttons that were produced during the Victorian and Edwardian periods are still around (today).

The large brass buttons have a diameter of 1 1/2 inches. The medium size brass button as a diameter of 1 inch. The small all-steel button has a diameter of 5/8 of an inch. The two steel cups have diameters of 1/2 of an inch.

All six buttons are in good antique condition. The rim of the medium size brass button with the pierced edge has a very slight uneven shape. For all three brass buttons, the brass has patina and the cut steel has darkened with age. The cut steel on the other three buttons still has some ‘shine’. All six buttons need cleaning.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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Returns & exchanges

I don't accept returns, exchanges, or cancellations

But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

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