Vintage Wedgwood Terra Cotta on Yellow Primrose Jasperware Teapot, With Bamboo Stalk and Applied Leaf Decorations

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Vintage Wedgwood Terra Cotta on Yellow Primrose Jasperware Teapot, With Bamboo Stalk and Applied Leaf Decorations

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$150.00

Rare find — there's only 1 of these in stock.

Item details

Vintage from before 2000

Materials

Wedgwood Teapot, Wedgwood, Jasperware, Terra Cotta on Primrose, Yellow Primrose, Bamboo Teapot, Bamboo Stalk, Unglazed Teapot, Bisque Teapot, 1970s Teapot, Pottery Teapot, Vintage Teapot, Applied Pottery Decoration

This is a vintage jasperware teapot that was made in England, by the Josiah Wedgwood and Sons company. The pot is shaped to resemble a vessel that is surrounded by pieces of bamboo stalks. The stalks, handle, spout, and lid of the teapot are unglazed bisque pottery and are in a color called yellow primrose. There are terra cotta colored leaf-shaped decorations applied to the stalks. This pattern was made by Wedgwood, in the 1970s. I am not sure when the pattern/line was discontinued, but is is no longer being made. The teapot has a mark on its underside that includes the words “Wedgwood” and “Made in England”.

Josiah Wedgewood (1730-1795) was the son of an impoverished and struggling English pottery maker. When he was nine years old, his father died and left his ailing business and his debts to his sons. When Josiah was still a child, an illness caused him to be permanently crippled and unable to do manual labor in the family’s pottery business. He, therefore, began to experiment with the business side of pottery; technology, marketing, and innovation. By the age of 22, he had mastered the trade, had decided to branch out on his own, and had begun to work with a well-known pottery maker who lived/worked near his hometown. In 1759, Josiah established his own pottery company, in Staffordshire, England. Throughout the years, Josiah’s company made a variety of wares, including the well-known jasperware (unglazed bisque pottery that is made with two colors of clay or with a color “dip”, to create a contrast in design), basalt, creamware, and even a limited amount of porcelain. Josiah pioneered new glazes and designs and constantly introduced new products and new ways to sell them. He is credited with being the inventor of modern marketing practices, including direct mail, money back guarantees, travelling salesmen, carrying pattern boxes for display, self-service, free delivery, buy one get one free, and illustrated catalogues. He was also elected to the Royal Society in 1783, for the development of a pyrometer, which is a device used to measure the extremely high temperatures that are found in kilns during the firing of pottery. Josiah was so successful as a ceramics maker that, when he died, he was the fourth richest man in England. His descendants ran the Wedgwood company, for many years. Over the years, the company used a variety of marks, including Wedgwood, Wedgwood & Bentley, Wedgwood & Sons, and Wedgwood's Stone China. In 1986, the Wedgwood company and the Irish Waterford Crystal company merged, to form the Waterford Wedgwood Group. It was known for its very high quality ceramics and glass. In 2009, most Waterford Wedgwood assets were bought by KPS Capital Partners of New York and became part of WWRD (Waterford Wedgwood Royal Doulton) Holdings. In 2015, WWRD was acquired by Fiskars, a Finnish consumer goods company. Today, Wedgwood is a part of the Fiskars Group and a small amount of Wedgwood pottery/porcelain is still made at a workshop in Staffordshire, England. Most of it, however, is made in Asia.

This teapot is about 8 1/4 inches wide (from the tip of the spout to the edge of the handle) by 5 1/4 inches high (including the lid). Without the lid, it is about 4 1/2 inches high.

This item is in very good condition, with no chips, cracks, or stains. It was difficult to capture the true yellow color of the teapot, in my images. In most of the images, the background color of the teapot appears to be more “off-white” than “pale yellow”. The color that is shown in images no. 5, however, is closest to the true beautiful pale yellow color of the teapot.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.
This is a vintage jasperware teapot that was made in England, by the Josiah Wedgwood and Sons company. The pot is shaped to resemble a vessel that is surrounded by pieces of bamboo stalks. The stalks, handle, spout, and lid of the teapot are unglazed bisque pottery and are in a color called yellow primrose. There are terra cotta colored leaf-shaped decorations applied to the stalks. This pattern was made by Wedgwood, in the 1970s. I am not sure when the pattern/line was discontinued, but is is no longer being made. The teapot has a mark on its underside that includes the words “Wedgwood” and “Made in England”.

Josiah Wedgewood (1730-1795) was the son of an impoverished and struggling English pottery maker. When he was nine years old, his father died and left his ailing business and his debts to his sons. When Josiah was still a child, an illness caused him to be permanently crippled and unable to do manual labor in the family’s pottery business. He, therefore, began to experiment with the business side of pottery; technology, marketing, and innovation. By the age of 22, he had mastered the trade, had decided to branch out on his own, and had begun to work with a well-known pottery maker who lived/worked near his hometown. In 1759, Josiah established his own pottery company, in Staffordshire, England. Throughout the years, Josiah’s company made a variety of wares, including the well-known jasperware (unglazed bisque pottery that is made with two colors of clay or with a color “dip”, to create a contrast in design), basalt, creamware, and even a limited amount of porcelain. Josiah pioneered new glazes and designs and constantly introduced new products and new ways to sell them. He is credited with being the inventor of modern marketing practices, including direct mail, money back guarantees, travelling salesmen, carrying pattern boxes for display, self-service, free delivery, buy one get one free, and illustrated catalogues. He was also elected to the Royal Society in 1783, for the development of a pyrometer, which is a device used to measure the extremely high temperatures that are found in kilns during the firing of pottery. Josiah was so successful as a ceramics maker that, when he died, he was the fourth richest man in England. His descendants ran the Wedgwood company, for many years. Over the years, the company used a variety of marks, including Wedgwood, Wedgwood & Bentley, Wedgwood & Sons, and Wedgwood's Stone China. In 1986, the Wedgwood company and the Irish Waterford Crystal company merged, to form the Waterford Wedgwood Group. It was known for its very high quality ceramics and glass. In 2009, most Waterford Wedgwood assets were bought by KPS Capital Partners of New York and became part of WWRD (Waterford Wedgwood Royal Doulton) Holdings. In 2015, WWRD was acquired by Fiskars, a Finnish consumer goods company. Today, Wedgwood is a part of the Fiskars Group and a small amount of Wedgwood pottery/porcelain is still made at a workshop in Staffordshire, England. Most of it, however, is made in Asia.

This teapot is about 8 1/4 inches wide (from the tip of the spout to the edge of the handle) by 5 1/4 inches high (including the lid). Without the lid, it is about 4 1/2 inches high.

This item is in very good condition, with no chips, cracks, or stains. It was difficult to capture the true yellow color of the teapot, in my images. In most of the images, the background color of the teapot appears to be more “off-white” than “pale yellow”. The color that is shown in images no. 5, however, is closest to the true beautiful pale yellow color of the teapot.

RETURNS AND REFUNDS

Please read the description and view the images, which are a part of the description. I will not accept a return, unless I made a material misstatement in describing the item or failed to disclose significant damage. In such an instance, if I am contacted within 4 days of the receipt of the item, I agree to accept a return, and the item is returned to me within 10 days of the receipt, I will provide a full refund and will also reimburse the buyer for reasonable return shipping costs (for which the method of return has been agreed upon, before the item is returned). If an item is damaged during the initial shipping, the buyer is responsible for communicating with (and submitting paperwork and proof of damage to) the shipper, so that a refund can be obtained. I will assist the buyer with obtaining compensation for the damaged shipment, to the extent that I am able to.

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From Delaware, OH
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