Weax: A Relatively Short, Non-linear History of Wax involving bees, whales, mummies, old books, Pilgrims, nuns, a search for truth

PeaPickleFarmBeeswax

Have a question about the item? Send a message.

This seller usually responds within 24 hours.

Weax: A Relatively Short, Non-linear History of Wax involving bees, whales, mummies, old books, Pilgrims, nuns, a search for truth

Message Seller

$30.00

Free shipping
Please select a quantity
Almost gone. There's only 2 left.

Item details

Handmade

Materials

paper, wax, thread

"Weax: A Relatively Short, Non-linear History of Wax" involves bees, whales, mummies and mutton birds, very old books, Pilgrims and nuns, a search for truth, outlaws and chemists, soy nuts and Ishmael, the Chihuahuan Desert, soot, smoke, grammar, arsenic, and yes, this book I've written is all about wax, or, as the Anglo-Saxons called it, "weax."

"Wax is as old as man. The English term wax is derived from the Anglo-Saxon weax, which was the name applied to the natural material of the honeycomb of the bee. When a material of similar resemblance was found in plants it also became known as weax or wachs, and later wax." (From "The Chemistry and Technology of Waxes," Albin H. Warth, 1947.)

The genesis of the book was me, a beeswax candlemaker, wanting to know if something I had heard quite often about beeswax were true: Is it true that beeswax candles emit negative ions that clean the air, and, if it is true, how do we know, and, if it isn't true, why say it? The answers were so elusive, and I am as easily distracted as the next, but I was never pulled fully off course, so, the answers are in there, nestling among what I found to be the more compelling stories of wax, like the one of adipocere and Dr. A. B. Granville from the early 1800s; Alice Morse Earle and the legendary bayberry wax taking us from the Pilgrims to my life as a secretary in the early 2000s; Michael Faraday and the chemical history of a candle (mid-1800s); Henry Ford and chemurgy and soy wax (the 20th century); ozocerite and the outlaw Gunplay Maxwell (mid-1800s to current times with a brief stop for a typical American gunfight); the greatest novel of all time, Moby Dick, and spermaceti (timeless); my own fond memory of paraffin Saturday nights (1960s-70s); a winding, wild ride through candle emission studies (recent times); the role burros play in candelilla wax (20th century and now, right now); and all those places this substance we call "wax" is naturally found and all the ways we devise to get at it and then all those things we add it to or turn it into from writing tablets to airplane slickers and, oh yeah, candles. But, alas, this book is only Volume One, it certainly does not cover it all. The fascinating tales of Madame Tussaud and Kathryn Stubergh and wax museums and Einstein's head must wait for Volume Two.

"Weax" is printed and bound at home, one book at a time. Here are the specs:

Pages: 70
Additional reference pages: 7
Images: Several
Size: 8 x 11 inches
Printed: HP Laserjet, b&w
Fonts: IM FELL English PRO, Constantia
Cover: Wax-coated paper, hand-colored
Binding: Stitched by hand, waxed thread

"wax (waks), n. beeswax; any tenacious substance like beeswax; cerumen of the ear; rage: v.t. to smear, rub, or join, with wax: v.i. to increase in size; become."
New Dictionary of the English Language, 1924

I am still a candlemaker, using both beeswax and bayberry wax and making ornaments from candelilla wax, but I no longer sell this product online. (This Etsy shop was originally my online candle shop. I put it on vacation in August 2017 and reopened it solely as a purchase point for "Weax.") I do, however, continue to sell candles at the farmers market in Marquette, Michigan, Saturday mornings now through mid-December. That is the one other place you can find "Weax," unless you happen to stop by my home. There are drafts of parts of the book online in blog posts (PeaPickleFarm.com) and at StoriesOfWax.com, a site I used as part of the process of turning the material into something more than blog posts. I like to think the printed book is a much more polished, coherent version of all that. Mostly it's been a labor of love.

"Weax" Chapters
Chapter 1: An Introduction, A burning question.
Chapter 2: A Pause, For a question of grammar.
Chapter 3: A Guiding Hand, From an old book.
Chapter 4: The Original Wax, From the honeybee.
Chapter 5: A Plethora of Wax, From mutton birds to mistletoe.
Chapter 6: A Traditional Wax, Myrtle Bayberry and the Pilgrims.
Chapter 7: Colonial Candlemaking, As described by Alice Morse Earle.
Chapter 8: Wax of the Wild West, And Gunplay Maxwell.
Chapter 9: A Wax Within, Or mum’s the word.
Chapter 10: And So We Are All Like Candles, So stay out of drafts!
Chapter 11: The Wax in the Whale, And the greatest novel of all time.
Chapter 12: A Slippery Wax, Although unlike others, it may just be O.K.
Chapter 13: Arsenic in Old Candles, A study by the Westminster Medical Society.
Chapter 14: Smoke, Clarity, soot, and a hoot.
Chapter 15: Oi Soy, The Miracle Bean.
Chapter 16: Now, Back to That Smoldering Question, Because there was a point here.
Chapter 17: The Answer, 28,304 negative ions.
Chapter 18: Formaldehyde Candles, They cleaned the air.
Chapter 19: Desert Wax, Because once you see wax in a mutton bird, you see it everywhere.
Chapter 20: Not Yet Snuffed, Another history of wax.
References & Image Credits
"Weax: A Relatively Short, Non-linear History of Wax" involves bees, whales, mummies and mutton birds, very old books, Pilgrims and nuns, a search for truth, outlaws and chemists, soy nuts and Ishmael, the Chihuahuan Desert, soot, smoke, grammar, arsenic, and yes, this book I've written is all about wax, or, as the Anglo-Saxons called it, "weax."

"Wax is as old as man. The English term wax is derived from the Anglo-Saxon weax, which was the name applied to the natural material of the honeycomb of the bee. When a material of similar resemblance was found in plants it also became known as weax or wachs, and later wax." (From "The Chemistry and Technology of Waxes," Albin H. Warth, 1947.)

The genesis of the book was me, a beeswax candlemaker, wanting to know if something I had heard quite often about beeswax were true: Is it true that beeswax candles emit negative ions that clean the air, and, if it is true, how do we know, and, if it isn't true, why say it? The answers were so elusive, and I am as easily distracted as the next, but I was never pulled fully off course, so, the answers are in there, nestling among what I found to be the more compelling stories of wax, like the one of adipocere and Dr. A. B. Granville from the early 1800s; Alice Morse Earle and the legendary bayberry wax taking us from the Pilgrims to my life as a secretary in the early 2000s; Michael Faraday and the chemical history of a candle (mid-1800s); Henry Ford and chemurgy and soy wax (the 20th century); ozocerite and the outlaw Gunplay Maxwell (mid-1800s to current times with a brief stop for a typical American gunfight); the greatest novel of all time, Moby Dick, and spermaceti (timeless); my own fond memory of paraffin Saturday nights (1960s-70s); a winding, wild ride through candle emission studies (recent times); the role burros play in candelilla wax (20th century and now, right now); and all those places this substance we call "wax" is naturally found and all the ways we devise to get at it and then all those things we add it to or turn it into from writing tablets to airplane slickers and, oh yeah, candles. But, alas, this book is only Volume One, it certainly does not cover it all. The fascinating tales of Madame Tussaud and Kathryn Stubergh and wax museums and Einstein's head must wait for Volume Two.

"Weax" is printed and bound at home, one book at a time. Here are the specs:

Pages: 70
Additional reference pages: 7
Images: Several
Size: 8 x 11 inches
Printed: HP Laserjet, b&w
Fonts: IM FELL English PRO, Constantia
Cover: Wax-coated paper, hand-colored
Binding: Stitched by hand, waxed thread

"wax (waks), n. beeswax; any tenacious substance like beeswax; cerumen of the ear; rage: v.t. to smear, rub, or join, with wax: v.i. to increase in size; become."
New Dictionary of the English Language, 1924

I am still a candlemaker, using both beeswax and bayberry wax and making ornaments from candelilla wax, but I no longer sell this product online. (This Etsy shop was originally my online candle shop. I put it on vacation in August 2017 and reopened it solely as a purchase point for "Weax.") I do, however, continue to sell candles at the farmers market in Marquette, Michigan, Saturday mornings now through mid-December. That is the one other place you can find "Weax," unless you happen to stop by my home. There are drafts of parts of the book online in blog posts (PeaPickleFarm.com) and at StoriesOfWax.com, a site I used as part of the process of turning the material into something more than blog posts. I like to think the printed book is a much more polished, coherent version of all that. Mostly it's been a labor of love.

"Weax" Chapters
Chapter 1: An Introduction, A burning question.
Chapter 2: A Pause, For a question of grammar.
Chapter 3: A Guiding Hand, From an old book.
Chapter 4: The Original Wax, From the honeybee.
Chapter 5: A Plethora of Wax, From mutton birds to mistletoe.
Chapter 6: A Traditional Wax, Myrtle Bayberry and the Pilgrims.
Chapter 7: Colonial Candlemaking, As described by Alice Morse Earle.
Chapter 8: Wax of the Wild West, And Gunplay Maxwell.
Chapter 9: A Wax Within, Or mum’s the word.
Chapter 10: And So We Are All Like Candles, So stay out of drafts!
Chapter 11: The Wax in the Whale, And the greatest novel of all time.
Chapter 12: A Slippery Wax, Although unlike others, it may just be O.K.
Chapter 13: Arsenic in Old Candles, A study by the Westminster Medical Society.
Chapter 14: Smoke, Clarity, soot, and a hoot.
Chapter 15: Oi Soy, The Miracle Bean.
Chapter 16: Now, Back to That Smoldering Question, Because there was a point here.
Chapter 17: The Answer, 28,304 negative ions.
Chapter 18: Formaldehyde Candles, They cleaned the air.
Chapter 19: Desert Wax, Because once you see wax in a mutton bird, you see it everywhere.
Chapter 20: Not Yet Snuffed, Another history of wax.
References & Image Credits

Shipping & returns

Ready to ship in 3–5 business days
From United States
Free shipping to United States
Returns accepted
Exceptions may apply. See return policy

Reviews

0 out of 5 stars (207)

Returns & exchanges

I gladly accept returns

Contact me within: 7 days of delivery
Ship items back within: 14 days of delivery

I don't accept exchanges or cancellations

But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.

The following items can't be returned or exchanged

Because of the nature of these items, unless they arrive damaged or defective, I can't accept returns for:
  • Custom or personalized orders
  • Perishable products (like food or flowers)
  • Digital downloads
  • Intimate items (for health/hygiene reasons)

Returns and exchange details

If you feel you must return the book, I expect it to be returned in excellent, like new condition. You are responsible for return shipping cost.

Shipping policies

Book is shipped via media mail.

Payments

Secure options
Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Etsy keeps your payment information secure. Etsy shops never receive your credit card information.
Credit cards, PayPal.