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The beautiful St. Johns Bridge spans the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. Construction began on this icon just one month before the stock market crashed in 1929, providing, by chance, many jobs for Portlanders during the Great Depression. It was announced on St Patricks Day in 1931 that the bridge would be painted green. The bridge's engineer, David Bernard Steinman, also designed the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan, among others.

This 8" x 10" black and white print was created using archival paper and ink rated to be fade resistant for up to 200 years when framed under glass. Then, we've taken the additional step of coating the print with an archival photo preservative for even more durability. In other words, this print will last a lifetime!

All of my prints are signed to make them more special and add to their value. They are protected in a sealed, clear plastic sleeve and carefully packaged to ensure safe arrival. All orders are shipped within two business days after payment has been received.

I'll mount this print in a standard 11 x 14 mat (your choice of black or white) for an additional $10.00. For $50.00, I'll frame it in a Nielsen Profile 15 frame with a matte black finish. Simply contact me with your request.

RETURN POLICY: If for any reason you aren't completely happy with your print, simply mail it back to me within 30 days for a full refund, including shipping costs.

Portland, Oregon St Johns Bridge Black and White Print


Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: paper, ink
  • Only ships within United States.
  • Feedback: 110 reviews
  • Favorited by: 92 people