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Cherry Burl Bowl Turned Wood Bowl Number 4326

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Bowl number 4326 is a hand turned bowl made from Cherry Burl. Each of my bowls are signed, numbered and dated (year). This bowl is finished with Carnauba Wax.

This bowl measures 7 1/8" across and is 1 1/2" high.

Cherry is a domestic hardwood. The heartwood is a medium red-brown with it’s own characteristic luster. The sapwood is narrow and nearly white. The grain is straight, finely textured and close with usually a gentle waving figure. Cherry has a uniform texture, is medium heavy, strong, stiff and moderately hard. Cherry is one of the most sought after hardwoods. Cherry turns darker as it ages.

A burl (British bur or burr) is a tree growth in which the grain has grown in a deformed manner. It is commonly found in the form of a rounded outgrowth on a tree trunk or branch that is filled with small knots from dormant buds. Burls are the product of a cambium. A burl results from a tree undergoing some form of stress. It may be environmental or introduced by humans. Most burls grow beneath the ground, attached to the roots as a type of malignancy that is generally not discovered until the tree dies or falls over. Such burls sometimes appear as groups of bulbous protrusions connected by a system of rope-like roots. Almost all burl wood is covered by bark, even if it is underground. Insect infestation and certain types of mold infestation are the most common causes of this condition. In some tree species, burls can grow to great size. Some of the largest occur in redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens); when moisture is present, these burls can grow new redwood trees. The world's largest and second-largest burls can be found in Port McNeill, British Columbia. One of the largest burls known was found around 1984 in the small town of Tamworth, Australia. It stands 6.4 ft tall, with an odd shape resembling a trombone. In January 2009, this burl was controversially removed from its original location, and relocated to a public school in the central New South Wales township of Dubbo. Burls yield a very peculiar and highly figured wood, one prized for its beauty by many; its rarity also adds to its expense. It is sought after by people such as furniture makers, artists, and wood sculptors. There are a number of well-known types of burls (each from a particular species); these are highly valued and used as veneers in furniture, inlay in doors, picture frames, household objects, automobile interior paneling and trim, and woodturning. The famous birdseye maple superficially resembles the wood of a burl but is something else entirely. Burl wood is very hard to work in a lathe or with hand tools because its grain is misshapen and not straight. Some burls are more highly prized than others, including ones originating in rural areas in central Massachusetts, northeast Connecticut, and as far south as Philadelphia. Some types display an explosion of sorts which causes the grain to grow erratically, and it is these burls that the artist prizes over all other types. These spectacular patterns enhance the beauty of wood sculptures, furniture, and other artistic productions. Burls are harvested by a variety of methods

Carnauba wax is a botanical product used in a large number of industries. Sometimes called the "Queen of Wax," carnauba wax has a much higher melting point than other waxes, and is also extremely hard. This makes it ideal for creating extremely strong coatings for floors, automobiles, and other things which see hard wear. In addition, carnauba wax appears in candies, polishes, varnishes, cosmetic products, and in many other places. Although carnauba wax has largely been replaced by synthetics, it is still produced and used in many parts of the world.

A Brazilian tree formally named Copernicia prunifera and otherwise known as the fan or carnauba palm is the source for carnauba wax. The palm has broad fan like leaves attached to toothed stalks. In hot, dry weather, the plant secretes wax to protect the leaves from damage. People who want to collect the wax dry the leaves and then beat them to dislodge the yellowish to brown waxy coating, which usually flakes off. The wax is refined and bleached before it is used. Carnauba palms can live in extreme environments because of their protective wax coating, making them an excellent choice of crop for farmers working with poor soil and weather conditions.
Bryan Tyler Nelson

Cherry Burl Bowl Turned Wood Bowl Number 4326

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: Carnauba Wax, Cherry Burl
  • Feedback: 373 reviews
  • Ships worldwide from Texas, United States
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