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This is a Don Blanding book illustration of a 1930's dancer. She has such a great energy to her. Dancing without a care throwing her scarf and flowers about. This is a book illustration dated 1933. I bought this illustration "as is" over twenty years ago so I'm not sure which book it came from. And because it is from a book that is so old the paper has yellowed, and is slightly tattered at the edges, but it is in great shape for a 78 years old image (it's been under glass for most of its life). It measures approx. 5 by 7.5 inches. Also in the second image there is a yellow mark across the corner and writing across the top. That is not on the image that is just on the case I have stored it in. The image itself just has a little yellowing and the number 33 in pencil at the bottom to denote the year it was issued. This was done by a previous owner who was an art dealer.

Here is a little description about Don Blanding below. He was quite a character, and a famous illustrator during his time. Oh and he saved the life of Joan Crawford as a little girl (During his high-school years in Lawton, Oklahoma, he is said to have saved the life of a 7- or 8-year-old neighbor, Lucille "Billie" Cassin, by picking her up and telephoning for a doctor, when she had jumped off her porch and deeply cut her foot on a broken milk bottle. Cassin eventually took the stage name of Joan Crawford, and their reacquaintance in 1936 on the set of "The Gorgeous Hussy", which starred her, suggests the level of his own celebrity.)

ABOUT DON BLANDING
Donald Benson Blanding (November 7, 1894–June 9, 1957) was an American poet who sentimentalized warm climates and was sometimes described as "poet laureate of Hawaii". He was also known as a journalist, author of prose, illustrator, and speaker.

Blanding was born on November 7, 1894, in Kingfisher, Oklahoma (in the period as a territory prior to that state's creation). He trained between 1913 and 1915 at the Art Institute of Chicago.

He enlisted (for a year, or the duration of World War I plus up to six months) in the Canadian Army's predominantly 97th ("American Legion") Battalion, training with them for trench warfare for eight months in 1916, but leaving service under unknown circumstances a few days before the unit shipped out for Europe. (He omitted reference to that service and training a year later in joining the U.S. military.)

Blanding soon became suddenly fascinated by Hawaii and traveled there, staying for the year until his enlistment in the U.S. Army in December, 1917. Entering as an infantry private, he underwent officer training and was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant before being discharged in December, 1918, soon after the Armistice.

He pursued further art studies in 1920, in Paris and London, traveled in Central America and the Yucatan, and resumed living in Honolulu in 1921. Finding work as an artist in an advertising agency, he happened into two years of writing poems published daily in the Honolulu Star Bulletin for an advertiser. These featured local people and events, and became well-known and popular -- whether because of or in spite of always mentioning the Aji-No-Moto brand of MSG.

The popularity of these ad-poems led Blanding to follow the advice of newspaper colleagues by publishing a collection of his poetry in 1923. When his privately published 2000 copies quickly sold out, he followed it with a commercially published edition the same year, and with additional verse and prose books. For his fifth book in 1928, he no longer used a local or West Coast publisher, but the New York publisher Dodd, Mead & Company. The result, Vagabond's House, was reviewed promptly by the New York Times, and was a great commercial success. By 1948 it went through nearly fifty printings in several editions that together sold over 150,000 copies.

In 1928 he suggested and founded the annual holiday, Lei Day, in Hawaii.

While he remained strongly attached to Hawaii, his connections to the world of celebrities drew him often to the mainland, and his income made hotel life and multiple residences feasible. During his high-school years in Lawton, Oklahoma, he is said to have saved the life of a 7- or 8-year-old neighbor, Lucille "Billie" Cassin, by picking her up and telephoning for a doctor, when she had jumped off her porch and deeply cut her foot on a broken milk bottle. Cassin eventually took the stage name of Joan Crawford, and their reacquaintance in 1936 on the set of "The Gorgeous Hussy", which starred her, suggests the level of his own celebrity.

Blanding married Dorothy Binney Putnam (described as a "socialite") on 13 June 1940, and they lived in Fort Pierce,Florida. They divorced in June 1947, and he had no descendants.

Blanding was strongly affected by U.S. entry into World War II, including the knowledge of his island paradise as a military target, the reactions of those he met on his lecture tours, and the fall of Bataan. Bataan surrendered April 9, 1942, while he was on tour, and he wrote "Bataan Falls", 16 emotional lines in response. On the 25th, he enlisted as a private, at the age of 47. He served eleven months in the 1208th Service Corps Unit, Infantry, and was discharged as a corporal.

He died of a heart attack, at home in Los Angeles on June 9, 1957, at the age of 62.

Dancer 1930 Don Blanding Illustration taken from a book

Overview

  • Vintage item from the 1930s
  • Material: paper
  • Feedback: 22 reviews
  • Ships worldwide from United States
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