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Pipkin, a Medieval Cooking Pot

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The ceramic pipkin was a favorite cooking pot and was used for cooking over coals for hundreds of years. My version of the pipkin has a strong, round shape, handsome as well as functional. The sparkle you see are mica flecks in the clay. Besides adding sparkle mica helps lessen the thermal shock so the pot can withstand more extreme temperatures. The mica clay is an earthenware which also lessens thermal shock.
Other practical aspects are the lid handle, which can be lifted off a hot pot with a stick; and the hollow handle which is perfect for grasping. I carefully balance the handle so the pot is not tippy. Another very important feature is the smooth, non-leaded glaze in the interior that will make clean up easier.
Whether you simmer a stew , boil tea water, or bake a peach cobbler, you will find it easy and very fun to use.
I include a paper with information on how best to use the pipkin and two Medieval recipes which call for a pipkin.
Because of the low-fired aspect of the clay, it is advised not to use this pot in a microwave, although use in a conventional oven is great and the dishwasher is also good. Earthenware is not as water-tight as stoneware, but that adds to its authentic charm.
It is7& 1/4" tall including the lid.
From the side handle to the opposite edge it is 11" wide.
It will hold 1 & 1/4 Quarts.

Pipkin, a Medieval Cooking Pot

Overview

  • Handmade item
  • Materials: terra cotta, foodsafe glaze
  • Feedback: 62 reviews
  • Only ships to United States from Idaho, United States.
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