Michelle's Profile

About

My name is Michelle and after I did my "required" 1001 origami cranes for my wedding in 2002, I swore I would never fold another crane again! By the end of 2004, I still had ideas for cranes that I couldn't get out of my head. Since no one I knew would be married anytime soon (or so I thought at the time) I decided to start a business so I'd have an excuse to make the things I had imagined. Little did I know that would only open up more "ideas" for cranes, including some that have nothing to do with the original tradition of 1001 cranes for weddings. Though I'm originally from Pearl City, Hawaii, in 2009, due to a family job transfer, I moved myself and my business to Fort Benning, Georgia, and this December, there was another move, to Salem, Alabama, near Auburn-Opelika. In 2014, we moved again, this time, to Colorado Springs, Colorado.

For those of you who are not familiar with the…

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  • Female
  • Born on July 27
  • Joined October 7, 2006

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  • 3DCranes
    Origami Crane Art, Wedding Bouquets, and...

About

My name is Michelle and after I did my "required" 1001 origami cranes for my wedding in 2002, I swore I would never fold another crane again! By the end of 2004, I still had ideas for cranes that I couldn't get out of my head. Since no one I knew would be married anytime soon (or so I thought at the time) I decided to start a business so I'd have an excuse to make the things I had imagined. Little did I know that would only open up more "ideas" for cranes, including some that have nothing to do with the original tradition of 1001 cranes for weddings. Though I'm originally from Pearl City, Hawaii, in 2009, due to a family job transfer, I moved myself and my business to Fort Benning, Georgia, and this December, there was another move, to Salem, Alabama, near Auburn-Opelika. In 2014, we moved again, this time, to Colorado Springs, Colorado.

For those of you who are not familiar with the tradition, the Japanese believed in "tsuru wa sennen", or "the crane lives for a thousand years. They also are known to mate for life, and so were the perfect symbol for marriage. Japanese-Americans in Hawaii added an extra "one" to the 1000 for "good luck." The bride is expected to fold 1001 origami cranes to teach her the "patience" required to survive married life. Originally strung from tree branches and other items, "mobile" style, it was displayed at the wedding reception. Later, people began creating images out of the cranes and framing them in shadow boxes. This is what I do, as well as my own unique twist to the tradition, 3D "sculptures" of origami cranes.

What you will see here on Etsy, are items completely made from varying amounts of origami cranes. No, you don't have to gather a total of 1001 in order to enjoy the origami, nor do you have to be a bride. Origami cranes are also symbols of longevity, and peace (google the story of Sadako and the 1000 cranes for more on that). I hope you will enjoy the items for their overall appearance as well.

For more information about my Etsy shop, please check out my "policies" page: http://www.etsy.com/shop/3DCranes/policy

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