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"Atelier Kanawa® " means "the studio to produce Japanese harmony & peace".
It is run by Kuniko Kanawa, a professional Tsumami Kanzashi artisan and also a certified Kimono consultant of All Japan Kimono consultant association.

In 2007, she became a professional Tsumami Kanzashi artisan through intensive trainings by one of only five acknowledged Tsumami Kanzashi artisans in Japan while none of them are accepting apprentice today due to the critical issue over supply and demand.
Kuniko's extraordinarily passion to preserve this inexpressibly beautiful traditional art luckily led her to be accepted as a private pupil even after her master stopped accepting pupils due to her serious illness. She passionately trained Kuniko by entrusting her to pass this art on to our future generation.
Kuniko is currently working on her Tsumami Kanzashi…

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  • Joined April 15, 2006

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About

"Atelier Kanawa® " means "the studio to produce Japanese harmony & peace".
It is run by Kuniko Kanawa, a professional Tsumami Kanzashi artisan and also a certified Kimono consultant of All Japan Kimono consultant association.

In 2007, she became a professional Tsumami Kanzashi artisan through intensive trainings by one of only five acknowledged Tsumami Kanzashi artisans in Japan while none of them are accepting apprentice today due to the critical issue over supply and demand.
Kuniko's extraordinarily passion to preserve this inexpressibly beautiful traditional art luckily led her to be accepted as a private pupil even after her master stopped accepting pupils due to her serious illness. She passionately trained Kuniko by entrusting her to pass this art on to our future generation.
Kuniko is currently working on her Tsumami Kanzashi book, partially as a memorial for her Tsumami Kanzashi master. This book will be very remarkable for introducing primarily *the authentic Tsumami Kanzashi* as well as the modern Kanzashi and its artisan's field focusing on how we should preserve our culture.

In the same year, Kuniko officially became a certified Kimono Consultant of All Japan Kimono Consultant Association through Sodo Kimono Academy. This certificate is approved by the Ministry Of Education/Science and Economy / Industry.
She has been teaching Kimono class, dressing her clients, working for Opera Madama butterfly, producing Kimono shows and so on.

Kuniko also has been studying to dye Kimono patterns by Bingata Katazome style. Bingata is the traditional Japanese method of dyeing fabric in Okinawa (southern part of Japan), using a resist paste applied through stencil. The term "Bingata Katazome" is divided form a combination of Kata (pattern or stencil), and Zome, from the verb Someru (to dye). Only natural ingredients are used in Bingata Katazome, such as ink, soy juice for diluting ink, brush, and fabric.

Beside, she has been producing Chiyo-gami and Origami jewelry, fused glass jewelry, and Japanese embroidery.

Since 2005, Kuniko has been pursuing classical Japanese dance as well by Hanayagi-style, which consists of Geisha dance, Noh, Kabuki and so on. She is currently in the advanced level.


Now she would love to share her stories about her ancestors who were in traditional Japanese business.

Her great grand father on her father's side was a part time Shinto priest at his local Inari shrine.
The other great grand father was a Kimono pattern dye artisan mainly for Yukata, the Summer Kimono. Her grand father on her father's side was a Ranma (an openwork screen above the sliding partitions between two rooms) wood curving artisan.
Both of her grand mothers were Kimono tailors. Her mother and aunt graduated from Kimono academies. Her aunt has taught Kimono classes in Japan.

Growing up in such a modernized Japanese environment, Kuniko did not know these remarkable histories of her family members for such a long time. However without knowing these facts, one day she became strongly inspired to learn deeply about her own culture and traditions. Her blood stream from her ancestors must have led her to this direction.
Today, she deeply regards her ancestors who were in traditional Japanese business.

As a successor of traditional Japanese culture, Kuniko passionately strives to introduce our "disappearing culture" nation wide and pass it on to our next generation.

Enjoy being a part of our beautiful culture!

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[MY PRESS RELEASE]
http://www.flickr.com/photos/atelierkanawa/2873972706/

Nikkan San
http://www.nikkansan.com/

Cultural News
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LaLaLa
http://www.lalalausa.com/

Kanzashi in Bloom - DIY Book
* I was introduced as authentic traditional Tsumami Kanzashi artisan.


[MY YouTube]
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[MY BLOG]
If you are interested in Japanese culture & Tradition, please visit my blog at http://www.myspace.com/atelierkanawa
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[STREET TEAM]
I am a member of:
Etsy Japan
http://team.etsy.com/viewregion.php?region=japan

Etsy Japanamaniac Artists
http://team.etsy.com/profilest/japanart.shtml


[COPYRIGHT]
©2009 Atelier Kanawa
All copyright and reproduction rights are reserved by the artisan. Creation and description of art pieces may not be reproduced without the written permission of the artisan.

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[ABOUT GEISHA, GEIKO, MAIKO, OIRAN]
Many people seem to have a hard time distinguishing Maiko / Hangyoku, Geiko / Geisha, and Oiran.

Maiko is apprentice Geiko. Long time ago, young girls between 9-12 years old begun to learn to become Maiko, but today, due to the Labor Standards Act and Child Welfare Act, they must be at least graduating from junior high school.
Miko add to the fun to banquet by singing, dancing, and playing Shamisen. Besides luxurious Kimono and Obi they wear beautiful hair ornament called Hana-Kanzashi which is the type of Tsumami Kanzashi. They change Hana-Kanzashi every month based on the seasonal flowers / plants of the months. Those girls who are in the same status in Tokyo area are called Hangyoku, meaning "half payment" of Geisha's payment.

Geiko is advanced Maiko after five years of training. They entertain clients at the banquet by showing a variety of art such as singing, dancing, and playing Shamisen. Both Maiko and Geiko are registered in "Okiya" in "Hana-machi" in Kyoto, such as Gion, and sent to "Ocha-ya" where the banquets are held.

Geisha means a person who entertains with her artistic skills. GEI means art, SHA means a person.They are the same as Geiko.
The root of Geisha goes back to Shira-byoshi, Yujo and Miko.
Shira-byoshi was mainly female and children who dressed up as male with White attire and Katana. They sung / danced without any instrument but with only the hand rhythm. Having access to the mansions of nobles, naturally led them to have relationships with nobles.
Yujo was the female who entertained males by dancing and so on at the banquet, but occasionally with sexual services.
Miko is a shrine maiden / a virgin consecrated to a deity who dance to convey oracles from deities.

Eventually Shira-byoshi disappeared due to war period. Aged Miko who had to leave their field begun to sing, dance, play Shamisen at Mizu-Chaya for visitors. Later they entertained visitors of the shrines / temples by imitating Kabuki. This custom was handed down to Edo (Toyko of today) and gradually formed the style of Geisha.
When Edo period begun, they were banned to perform, due to imitating Yakuza and emphasizing too much of female sexuality.
Therefore the Tokugawa Shogunate approved Yukaku, a pleasure quarters / red-light district, to segrigate the region for entertainment and prostitution. The Tokugawa shogunate restricted prostitution in Yukaku. They chose either to live inside Yukaku or live as entertainer outside of it.
Today, Geisha add to the fun to banquet by singing, dancing, and playing Shamisen. Even though Geisha system was constructed in a licensed quarters, they are strictly distinguished from prostitute. For example, they wear Tabi socks while courtesans do not wear them. They hold the opening side of Kimono to the left so that the men are not able to slide their hands into their Kimono. This is called Hidari-Duma. Hidari-Duma means that you will provide strictly entertainment only but not any sexual services.

Oiran is the courtesan in a licensed quarters, with education of classical scholar, calligraphy, tea ceremony, a thirty-one syllable Japanese poem, Shamisen, the game of go, and also entertainment accomplishment. They were considered a type of Yujo, but many became celebrities of their times because of their art and fashion. Among Oiran, Tayu was the highest rank Oiran who achieved the highest skills of all Japanese art. Only the wealthiest and highest ranking could become a patron for Tayu.

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