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Carrie Goller's Profile

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Carrie Goller Studios

Pacific NW artist working in oil, mixed media, encaustic and egg tempera (also some figurative sculpture). Most of my original work is posted on my website www.CarrieGoller.com, or in my blog, but there are a few originals here. Prints are available of most of my work. Thank you for taking time to read about me! Our local tv station just videotaped me and my work, so if you'd like to see it the link is: http://vimeo.com/20860954

Here's a little bio info and also somethign about one of my favorite mediums -- encaustic.

C A R R I E G O L L E R

Pacific Northwest artist, Carrie Goller recalls being advised as a child to pursue a career in fine art, but it wasn’t until she battled breast cancer that she became a serious and dedicated artist…

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  • Female
  • Born on June 29
  • Joined March 14, 2008

Favorite materials

oil paint, acrylic, encaustic, beeswax, pastels, photography, mixed media, watercolor, collage, metals, reclaimed wood, Seattle

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About

Carrie Goller Studios

Pacific NW artist working in oil, mixed media, encaustic and egg tempera (also some figurative sculpture). Most of my original work is posted on my website www.CarrieGoller.com, or in my blog, but there are a few originals here. Prints are available of most of my work. Thank you for taking time to read about me! Our local tv station just videotaped me and my work, so if you'd like to see it the link is: http://vimeo.com/20860954

Here's a little bio info and also somethign about one of my favorite mediums -- encaustic.

C A R R I E G O L L E R

Pacific Northwest artist, Carrie Goller recalls being advised as a child to pursue a career in fine art, but it wasn’t until she battled breast cancer that she became a serious and dedicated artist.

“Art has become a necessity for me. It's both work and play; exhilarating yet restorative. It's where I find balance,” says Goller. “I am truly grateful for the support and encouragement I have received to indulge my passion.”

Goller is lured by simple yet sensuous organic forms and the intoxicating realm of vibrant colors, shapes and textures found in nature. Her thoughtful approach to subject matter can be evidenced from her tender still life work, along with a passion for rendering portraiture from vintage photographs. She transitions with ease within a wide range of genres and media, including oil, watercolor, pastel and charcoal, as well as ancient mediums such as encaustic (molten pigmented beeswax), casein and egg tempera.

Goller’s approach tends to be experimental with leanings toward the classical. Her newest venture is Rockwater Art Center, an elegant turn-of-the-century farmhouse set amid an acre of beautiful landscaping and water features in Poulsbo, Washington. Rockwater serves as a private retreat for intensive art instruction from some of the country’s best educators, as well as another gallery for Goller’s art. Encouraged by realism master Juliette Aristides, Goller is considering a classical atelier at Rockwater.

Eleven galleries showcase Goller’s work, which is held in U.S. and international collections. Recently two of her paintings were selected for the 2011 Washington State Annual Collective Visions Gallery Show and she was featured in the October 2010 issue of national magazine, American Art Collector.

“As a colorist, I truly appreciate Carrie Goller’s work. She has a wonderful talent for creative combinations that really do engage the eye,” says collector, Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute.


WHAT IS ENCAUSTIC?

Encaustic is the very earliest known form of paint, first used by the Greeks over 2000 years ago. The amazing Fayum Mummy Portraits were painted in encaustic by the Greeks in Egypt. They are still fresh and vibrant, and are exhibited today in the world's greatest galleries.

Encaustic painting involves melting, applying, then heat fusing layers of beeswax (resin and pigment can be added). The wax gives an optical depth unique to the medium.

Encaustic has returned from obscurity as modern tools have made the process more practical. Diego Rivera used encaustic in the 1930's on his murals. Jasper Johns is credited with the current renaissance of encaustic fine art with his work that began in the 1950's.

"Why paint in a process-intensive medium that's over 2000 years old?" is rarely asked. That answer is a given: luminosity, rich surface, the beauty of the wax.

Carrie Goller interprets this ancient medium into very contemporary work, creating paintings with brilliant luminosity, as well as some with a rich, delicate opalescence. Maintaining their freshness and intensity, they will not darken or yellow. Because of the protective nature of wax they are impervious to moisture and need not be varnished or put under glass.

Member of the following Etsy street teams:

Indie Artist of Etsy: (http://indieetsy.blogspot.com )
VAST (Visual Artists Street Team): http://vastgallery.blogspot.com/
www.beeswaxteam.com
www.EtsyRain.com
CAST Team
FAM Team (http://fam-fabulousartisticmoms.blogspot.com/)
http://originalartistsonetsy.blogspot.com

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