Dahlush's Profile

About

India inspires me to work with a traditional craft and reimagine it in someone's home here, not folded up in a drawer to admire from time to time. So I trepidatiously put scissor to sari and cut, and see new possibilities emerge--quilts, pillows, curtains--which allow the fabrics' beauty to find expression in a new form that can be understood and appreciated in a different culture.

My designs emerged from the incredible diversity of Indian textiles--be it kantha or applique, ikat, mushru or zari work. The majority of my work is done in India with small artisan groups. The textiles are either handwoven or handworked by these artisans and myself.

Traditional textile, needle work and embroidery techniques are tweaked, using non-traditional colors, styles, and trims to create quilts, throws, pillows, shawls and other objects…

Read more

  • Female
  • Joined July 25, 2007

Favorite materials

Indian Handwovens, Nepalese cotton, silk, cotton, mushru, mutka, eri, muga, chintz, Benarsi silk, zari, brocade, chintz and khadi

About

India inspires me to work with a traditional craft and reimagine it in someone's home here, not folded up in a drawer to admire from time to time. So I trepidatiously put scissor to sari and cut, and see new possibilities emerge--quilts, pillows, curtains--which allow the fabrics' beauty to find expression in a new form that can be understood and appreciated in a different culture.

My designs emerged from the incredible diversity of Indian textiles--be it kantha or applique, ikat, mushru or zari work. The majority of my work is done in India with small artisan groups. The textiles are either handwoven or handworked by these artisans and myself.

Traditional textile, needle work and embroidery techniques are tweaked, using non-traditional colors, styles, and trims to create quilts, throws, pillows, shawls and other objects around the home.

In India, textiles are still the pride of the country. It struck me that in every city or village in India, anyone from the taxi/rickshaw driver and on would tell you what particular craft their region was known for and knew on what street to find the best weavers.

As I am a textile junkie, inspiration comes from a myriad of sources--
it can be an old belt embroidered with metal threads and jewels, my grandmother's skirt, a summer blanket from the bottom of a drawer.

Working with artisan groups around the country I honed my passion for handwovens. I sought to work with the best of these artisans to develop pieces that would appeal to westerners. Using traditional fabrics that may not be known outside the region, I try shining them up a bit (hopefully not too much) to bring them before a new audience.

I never wanted to do clothing with these fabrics as I wanted to find a way the textiles, at that point, saris, could be SEEN as a WHOLE, as intended, rather than cut apart. But not that should lay hidden in drawers. The obvious conclusion led to home decor-- wall hangings, quilts and pillows-- rather than clothing. Once I started working in "home furnishings" I was hooked by the vastness of possibilities. Creating a "WARDROBE for the HOME" which ties in traditional crafts is a great opportunity on all fronts.

I believe, The Hand that Weaves, Rocks the World.

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?