Les Thede's Profile

About

Everlasting Furniture was created to promote the design and creation of furniture that will last generations. In 2000, I grew tired of using furniture and furnishings that seemed to be designed to self-destruct in a few short years. That's when I began to make creations for my wife, my kids, my grandkids and a few close friends. Making fine furniture and furnishings has become my passion! My goal is to produce keepsakes that will last generations!

Most fine furniture and furnishings can be distinguished by three important characteristics: Materials, Joinery and Finishing.

Materials

Most of the pieces I make are made from local hardwoods, harvested within one hundred miles of Ada, Ohio. These include maple, cherry, walnut, oak, ash and poplar. The rough-sawn lumber is moved to my shop where…

Read more

  • Male
  • Born on August 14
  • Joined April 10, 2008

Favorite materials

Any beautiful local hardwood such as cherry, maple, walnut, oak, ash, etc

Shop

EverLastingFurniture
EverLasting Furniture and Furnishings

About

Everlasting Furniture was created to promote the design and creation of furniture that will last generations. In 2000, I grew tired of using furniture and furnishings that seemed to be designed to self-destruct in a few short years. That's when I began to make creations for my wife, my kids, my grandkids and a few close friends. Making fine furniture and furnishings has become my passion! My goal is to produce keepsakes that will last generations!

Most fine furniture and furnishings can be distinguished by three important characteristics: Materials, Joinery and Finishing.

Materials

Most of the pieces I make are made from local hardwoods, harvested within one hundred miles of Ada, Ohio. These include maple, cherry, walnut, oak, ash and poplar. The rough-sawn lumber is moved to my shop where it is acclimated to the indoor temperature and humidity. After several days, the material is cut into rough lengths and widths, joined and planed to produce flat, stable blanks before being cut to final shape and form. A great deal of effort is put into selecting the best material for the project with grain that is both interesting and matched throughout the project.
On occasion, recycled/reclaimed lumber is used to design a unique piece with all of the natural charm inherent to the lumber. Knots, splits, cracks, insect holes, peg holes and the like are evident in the finished project and give it a unique charm. These characteristics set these pieces apart from the formica-like features and the spray-stained uniformity of mass produced items. (See the keepsake boxes in my portfolio.)

Joinery

There are many joinery methods used in furniture making today: mortise and tenon, dovetail joints, mitered corners, half-lap joints and others. Most date back hundreds of years to craftsmen of the 17th and 18th century. Unfortunately, there are too many to discuss here. Each technique has its own unique method of construction, and generally, the stronger and more decorative joints take longer to construct.

Finishing

A project is not complete until it's finished! The finishing process on a woodworking project may include staining, which can change the overall tone and color of the wood. This step is sometimes beneficial when trying to blend the tones of wood from different trees or to match other pieces of furniture. Mild changes of color or tone may be necessary, but I hesitate to try to make a piece of hard maple look like a piece of black walnut!
After the completion of the staining process (if used), a protective finish is usually in order. There are a variety of finishes which can be applied to any wood project and they vary in final appearance and level of protection. In general, I prefer to use a finish which does not hide the beauty of the wood, but rather accentuates it.

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?